LOCATIONS FILTERS

Arlene Gottfried: Midnight

January 20 - March 5

508 W 26th St, Ste 9C, New York, NY +

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Arlene Gottfried: Midnight

January 20 - March 5

 

 

ARLENE GOTTFRIED                                                  January 20 – March 5, 2022

Midnight

 

Midnight became my friend in the summer of 1984. Handsome, friendly, and fun to be with, Midnight invited me to an underground Lower East Side club where he was performing a dance to the beat of drums and the poetry of Miguel Algarín and Miguel Piñero. We went to places like Coney Island and the Staten Island Ferry; I took photographs, and he seemed very comfortable.

 

Midnight had so many colorful stories to tell for such a young person. Ismael, his real name, had only occasionally seen his father. He and his sister, Margie, were raised by a Black woman they called Mommie Margaret. He ran away from home at the age of thirteen. To survive on his own, he became involved in hustling on the streets. He worked at odd jobs and traveled (mostly by bus) to cities all across the United States. Ismael did time in prison and he may have even robbed a bank.

 

After we got to know each other better, Midnight became withdrawn. He was often so far away that he wouldn’t say a word for days. There is a photograph of him where he looks like Jesus, with very long hair and staring off into space. He was delusional at that time but I did not know it then. When he began telling me the story of the crucifixion and that “The Time Is Now!” I felt very nervous and frightened. He wasn’t making any sense. The next morning, there was a knock at the door – there stood Midnight, dressed in an outrageous outfit made up of scarves and other colorful bits of clothing. Holding up a wooden Japanese sword, Midnight said he was going to walk to Canada. This episode led up to the time he was standing on top of the Williamsburg Bridge, ready to jump into the East River, but the police got him down and brought him to Bellevue Hospital. Midnight called me from inside Bellevue’s emergency room, where he was hospitalized for several months until he was stabilized and released into his own care.

 

Midnight’s cycle was to become ill, get hospitalized or imprisoned, take medication and see counselors, and then become a member of a program with therapy. Getting this kind of help seemed to work for a while; then something would go wrong and the voices would start telling him to jump on a bus to California, the Midwest, or anywhere and everywhere a bus could take him. Then, when he reached a destination, depending on his condition, he would do something drastic, like the time he set his hand on fire and wandered for miles without food or shelter until someone finally called the police and he was taken away in an ambulance. Then it would start all over again.

 

I found out later that this very gentle, sensitive soul suffers from schizophrenia. As a friend I tried to help him when he would escape from the hospital – I always

 

 

took him back. I went with him to the Social Security office and to apply for welfare. It could take a whole day just to be seen by someone. Helping Midnight was an exhausting commitment. At times he was doing very well and could hold down a job, but eventually his illness would kick in and he’d be off and running.

 

There were times when his sense of humor was shining through – his playfulness and enjoyment of films, art, music, dancing and singing was absolutely contagious. He even wrote some country-sounding songs that he sang to me. From some place in his silence and observation, he possessed an acute intuition and sensitivity to life.

 

In 1987, Margie died of AIDS, leaving five children. They were Midnight’s only family and he had not seen any of them since the funeral. One day, I came across their phone numbers and gave them to Midnight. He called and found out that some of them had gotten in trouble with the law. He sounded very sad about this as he told the story to me over the telephone.

 

There were times when he disappeared for months. Some days when I came home I found that he had called and left a message on my answering machine. He could be calling from downstairs in the lobby or from anywhere in the USA – once he called me from Puerto Rico. Last winter, after a long silence, he showed up after months of being homeless. He looked so worn down; I didn’t know if he’d make it. I gave him something to eat. Later, I was riding the crosstown bus on 14th Street and saw him out the window. I jumped off to talk to him. He was looking so much better; he had gotten himself into a men’s shelter where he had cleaned up, changed clothes, and shaved off his long hair.

 

For a while he had been living in a supervised residence where he felt at home. On occasion, he would still travel – sometimes weekend trips to Washington D.C. and Atlantic City, or longer journeys to San Francisco and New Orleans. But, Midnight has now been gone for almost a year. He called a few months ago to ask for food and money to get back to New York. His residence sent him a bus ticket, but when the bus arrived at Port Authority, he was not on it.

 

The photographs of Midnight date from 1984 to 2002 and are arranged in chronological order.

 

Statement by Arlene Gottfried (1950 – 2017)

 

This is the gallery’s fifth exhibition of Arlene Gottfried’s photographs. Midnight consists of 22 color prints and 10 black and white prints.

 

Gottfried is also currently featured in the exhibition “Clandestine” at the Cobra Museum of Art in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Her work has been published in five monographs, “The Eternal Light”, “Midnight”, “Sometimes Overwhelming”, “Bacalaitos & Fireworks” and “Mommie”. Her photographs have been featured in The New York Times, TIME, LIFE, The Guardian, CBS News and elsewhere. Her work is held in the collections of The Brooklyn Museum, The Jewish Museum, The Tang Teaching Museum, The North Carolina Museum of Art and the New York Public Library. She is prominently featured in the film “Gilbert” a documentary on her brother, the comedian Gilbert Gottfried.

 

Please contact the gallery for more information at 212 255 8158 or dan@danielcooneyfineart.com.


Press Release

Daniel Cooney Fine Art

508 W 26th St, Ste 9C, New York, NY 10001

212.255.8158

dan@danielcooneyfineart.com

Open Tues-Sat 11-6


Between Background and Foreground

January 20 - August 7

Oberlin College, 87 N Main St, Oberlin, Ohio +

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Between Background and Foreground

January 20 - August 7

Last fall, LaToya Ruby Frazier’s photograph Grandma Ruby’s Refrigerator was the centerpiece for incoming students’ conversations about identity, place, and social change in the exhibition Shared Art. This spring, the conversations continue with a selection of images from the AMAM collection of American photography. From Lewis Hine’s portrait of Pittsburgh steelworkers in the early 20th century to a still life by Nan Goldin taken in the first days of quarantine in 2020, the exhibition probes how and why artists have captured personal experiences and larger social narratives in their photography.


Allen Memorial Art Museum

Oberlin College, 87 N Main St, Oberlin, Ohio 44074

440.775.8665

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5


Elaine Duigenan: Bloßfeldts Lehrling

November 14, 2021 - January 30, 2022

57072 Siegen, Germany +

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Elaine Duigenan: Bloßfeldts Lehrling

November 14, 2021 - January 30, 2022

Elaine Duigenan, British photographic artist, recreates Karl Blossfeldt’s iconic photographs of plants in twine. This series was premiered by Klompching Gallery [New York] at AIPAD [Association of International Photography Art Dealers] and has continuously attracted attention. It received gold at the Prix de la Photographie (Paris) and an international photography award at the Pingyao International Festival of Photography, in China. The images depict handmade objects made from cable ties*. They attempt to recreate plant structures seen in iconic photographs by German artist Karl Blossfeldt (1920s). Karl Blossfeldt (1865-1932) was a German art professor and wanted to encourage his students to pay conscious attention. He built a camera that could magnify up to 30 times and took hundreds of photographs of plant forms. He wanted to demonstrate that the best design was already given in nature. The artist engaged with his images and thus, became a student of today – twisting, tying and bending the material to her will. She says: “My imperfect specimens taunted me with their limitations. But embracing the flaws became the meaning of the work, and showing the connections and loose threads reveals the tension between perfection and imperfection.”
*A cable tie is a metal wire covered with a thin plastic strip used to close the openings of bags, such as garbage or bread bags.
The artist has exhibited internationally and her work is in collections such as the V&A and the Museum of Fine Art in Houston. Her work is represented by Klompching Gallery in New York. In late 2009, one of her paintings was flown to the International Space Station on the shuttle Atlantis. Elaine helped bring the practice of digital scanning (scanography) to the forefront in the 1990s, and her work is exemplified in the V&A’s History of Photographic Processes. It is a truly unique method of capturing such detail and depth. The objects Elaine works with are found or made; things are never quite what they seem, and her work is reduced to a search for unique beauty. Pale specimens glow in deep black spaces and seem to hang by a thread. There is strength and fragility, perfection and imperfection. Her works excite the viewer as the images hover somewhere between whimsicality and elegance.

We cordially invite you to the exhibition
Elaine Duigenan
Blossfeldt’s Apprentice
Photography
November 14, 2021 to January 31, 2022
Vernissage: Sunday, November 14, 2021, 11 a.m. Chiara Bohn will speak at the opening.
The then valid Corona protection rules apply


Art Galerie

57072 Siegen, Germany


Fragments of Epic Memory

September 1, 2021 - February 21, 2022

317 Dundas Street West, Toronto, Ontario M5T 1G4, Canada +

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Fragments of Epic Memory

September 1, 2021 - February 21, 2022

Fragments of Epic Memory will invite visitors to experience the multiple ways of encountering the Caribbean and its diaspora, from the period following emancipation through today.

The first exhibition organized by the AGO’s new Department of Arts of Global Africa and the Diaspora, it will blend historical and contemporary narratives, presenting more than 200 photographs from the AGO’s Montgomery Collection of Caribbean Photographs alongside paintings, sculpture, and video works by modern and contemporary Caribbean artists that show how the region’s histories are constantly revisited and reimagined through artistic production over time.

Fragments of Epic Memory is curated by Julie Crooks, Curator of Arts of Global Africa and the Diaspora and will feature a new commission by Sandra Brewster and art works by Ebony G. Patterson, Frank Bowling, and Manuel Mathieu to name just a few.

 

Image Caption:

Paul Anthony Smith, Untitled, 7 Women, 2019. Unique picotage on inkjet print, coloured pencil, spray paint on museum board, 101.6 x 127 cm. The Hott Collection, New York © Paul Anthony Smith. Image courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York


Art Gallery of Ontario

317 Dundas Street West, Toronto, Ontario M5T 1G4, Canada

877.225.4246

Open Tues-Sun 10-5:30, Wed 10-8:30


Kerrick James: Arizona Odyssey — Forty Years of Roaming for Beauty

December 4, 2021 - March 5, 2022

207 N Gilbert Rd, Ste 201 Gilbert, AZ +

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Kerrick James: Arizona Odyssey — Forty Years of Roaming for Beauty

December 4, 2021 - March 5, 2022

Kerrick James began photographing Arizona in 1977, at first only the wild places of exotic beauty, then over time the people and cultures of our Southwestern nirvana. These 67 images are drawn from a thousand explorations across the expanse of Arizona. Some are of places now lost to flood or time. They depict iconic landscapes, ephemeral weather and celestial phenomena, billion-year-old rocks and medusa-like saguaros, cowboys and horses, Hopi and Navajo dancers, adventurers and musicians alike. And of course, Route 66, our distinctive slice of the highway of American myth, and promised freedom.

Photographs are intrinsically documents, but they should also reveal more than mere place, or be a singular time stamp. They can show us ourselves, through the prism of tones and colors, shapes and lines, loss and discovery. I invite you to share in these moments of beauty and life lived well by those I’ve met along the road, and by one sublimely lucky photographer…

Please see the HD South website for admission pricing and more information!

Image credit: Kerrick James


Art Intersection

207 N Gilbert Rd, Ste 201 Gilbert, AZ 85234

480.361.1118

info@artintersection.com

Open Wednesday - Saturday, 10am - 6pm


Cheryl Mukherji: Wanted Beautiful Home Loving Girl

January 12 - February 19

126 Baxter St. New York, NY +

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Cheryl Mukherji: Wanted Beautiful Home Loving Girl

January 12 - February 19

Cheryl Mukherji (b. 1995, India) is a visual artist and writer currently living and working in Brooklyn, New York. She graduated with an MFA in Advanced Photographic Studies from the International Center of Photography-Bard College, New York in 2020. Cheryl has been a recipient of the ICP Director’s Fellowship for the years 2018-2020.

In her current work, Cheryl explores the idea of origin and inheritance, which is embedded in the figure of her mother and her presence in the family album. It deals with memory, personal history, transgenerational trauma, and how they inform identity. Cheryl primarily works with photography, text, and video. Cheryl has been the recent recipient of Capture Photography Festival’s Writing Prize, Brooklyn Museum’s #Your2020Portrait award, South Asian Arts Resiliency Fund (SAARF), Firecracker Photography Grant, and was nominated for the inaugural Next Step Award by Aperture Foundation and Baxter St at the Camera Club of New York. Her work has been exhibited at the Format Photo Festival (UK), Brooklyn Museum (US) Museum of Moving Image (US) International Center of Photography (US) Serendipity Arts Festival (IN).


Baxter St at CCNY

126 Baxter St. New York, NY 10013

212.260.9927

baxterst@cameraclubny.org

Open Tues-Sat 12-6

Summer Hours: Closed July 3rd, August 7-11



Werner Bischof: Werner Bischof, Japan 1951 – 1952

November 25, 2021 - February 26, 2022

Stauffacherquai 56, 8004 Zürich, Switzerland +

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Werner Bischof: Werner Bischof, Japan 1951 – 1952

November 25, 2021 - February 26, 2022

With the exhibition “Werner Bischof, Japan 1951 – 1952” the Bildhalle Zurich presents in addition to Bischof’s renowned photographs of Japan, including the iconic Meiji Shrine, newly discovered photographs, never published before. Platinum prints in limited editions as well as exclusive vintage prints from the estate will be on view. 


Bildhalle

Stauffacherquai 56, 8004 Zürich, Switzerland

4.144.552.0918

Open Wednesday – Friday: 12 – 6.30 H Saturday: 11 – 4 H Or by appointment


Kensuke, Koike: Dear Friend

January 6 - January 29

122 NW 8th Ave Portland, OR +

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Kensuke, Koike: Dear Friend

January 6 - January 29

Kensuke Koike is a contemporary visual artist working at the intersection of photography, collage, and sculpture. In Dear Friend, Koike deconstructs vintage photographs or postcards to create new images by cutting, pasting and reassembling by hand. Many of his works visually transform in utilizing the approach of “nothing added, nothing removed,” by rearranging the pieces and parts, into something completely reimagined. Koike’s eye for the surreal reinvents found imagery into surprising and delightful objects. His “renewed” photographs challenge the viewer’s expectations with new associations that reveal humor, curiosity, absurdity, and beauty.

“If I have many ingredients in my refrigerator, I can cook everything I want. But some ingredients may never be used. If I find only a carrot inside, I must cook it in the best way possible by chopping, grating, roasting, boiling, frying, drying, etc. With many ingredients I would probably never discover that the carrot itself can be such a delicious ingredient.”
– Kensuke Koike

 

Kensuke Koike (Japanese, b. 1980) was born in Nagoya, Japan and is currently based in Venice, Italy. Koike has exhibited nationally and internationally, including Postmasters Gallery, NYC, USA; The Photographer’s Gallery, London, UK; IMA Gallery, Tokyo, Japan, among others. Koike studied at the Academy of Fine Arts, Venice, Italy (1999-2004) and IUAV University, Faculty of Arts and Design, Venice, Italy (2004-2007).

 

Blue Sky is open by appointment only, please visit the website for more information

 

Image courtesy of the artist.


Blue Sky Gallery

122 NW 8th Ave Portland, OR 97209

503.225.0210

Open Tues-Sun 12-5



Jana Sophia Nolle: Living Room: San Francisco & Berlin

January 6 - January 29

122 NW 8th Ave Portland, OR +

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Jana Sophia Nolle: Living Room: San Francisco & Berlin

January 6 - January 29

Jana Sophia Nolle’s series Living Room: San Francisco & Berlin concentrates on the ever-growing rift between rich and poor. Now living and working primarily in Berlin, her conceptual photographic study of makeshift shelters began during her stays in San Francisco from 2016 — 2019.

Nolle works with people living on the streets to understand how their improvised dwellings are constructed. After establishing relationships with the unhoused individuals, and with their permission, Nolle approaches wealthy people for permission to access their homes. Then, in a performative act, she recreates and photographs the makeshift shelters within the homes of the wealthy.

The photographs are an inventory, a typology of improvised dwellings, cataloging their various attributes. The elaborate reconstructions show a conglomerate of repurposed items and materials, resulting in a series of architectural interiors. While aesthetically striking, Nolle’s resulting contrast of living spaces also touches on larger phenomena of socio-political changes, housing shortages, exclusion and gentrification. The project aims to challenge our perceptions and definitions of living space and wealth, of poverty, and the importance of refuge and security.

Living Room is an ongoing project. Currently Nolle is working on its European continuation in Paris and London.

Jana Sophia Nolle (German, b. 1986) lives and works with her daughter in Berlin, Germany. Her practice, which consists of photography and found footage, operates at the intersection of research, observation and documentation, and shifts between conceptual photography, video, objects, and installations. Often, the starting point of her projects is based on either autobiographical experiences or social phenomena. Her interests reflect a fascination with social change and justice, fragile identities, as well as individuals embedded in socio-political transformations.

Nolle’s photographs are included in numerous public and private collections, and have been exhibited internationally in solo and group exhibitions, most recently at Haus am Kleistpark Berlin, Weserburg Museum für Moderne Kunst Bremen, Torrance Art Museum Los Angeles, Santo Tirso International Museum of Contemporary Sculpture Portugal, UNSEEN Amsterdam and the Catharine Clark Gallery in San Francisco. Her work “Living Room, San Francisco 2017/2018” won various grants, awards and prizes, including the Berlin Senate research grant 2021, the LensCulture Emerging Talent Award 2019, the 2019/20 the Haus am Kleistpark Photography Fellowship, and the Neuköllner Art Prize 2020. In 2020, she published the project as one monograph, “Living Room, San Francisco 2017/18” with Kehrer Verlag.

Since 2019 Nolle has been an affiliate artist with Catharine Clark Gallery, San Francisco, CA, USA. Nolle received her MSc from SOAS University London, UK, and a degree in Photography from Ostkreuzschule für Fotografie, Berlin, Germany.

 

Blue Sky is open by appointment only, please visit website for more information.

Image courtesy of the artist.

 


Blue Sky Gallery

122 NW 8th Ave Portland, OR 97209

503.225.0210

Open Tues-Sun 12-5



20th Anniversary Show

December 16, 2021 - February 19, 2022

529 W 20th St New York , NY +

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20th Anniversary Show

December 16, 2021 - February 19, 2022

Bruce Silverstein Gallery is pleased to announce REWIND, a celebration of our 20th anniversary. Featuring works selected from over one hundred exhibitions, REWIND is an opportunity to revisit the gallery’s ever-evolving program and to salute the extraordinary artists who have entrusted the gallery with their legacies.


Bruce Silverstein Gallery

529 W 20th St New York , NY 10011

212.627.3930

inquiries@brucesilverstein.com

Open Tuesday-Saturday, 10am-6pm

Summer Hours: Mon-Friday 10-6


LaToya Ruby Frazier: LaToya Ruby Frazier: The Last Cruze

September 8, 2021 - March 20, 2022

600 State Dr, Los Angeles, CA +

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LaToya Ruby Frazier: LaToya Ruby Frazier: The Last Cruze

September 8, 2021 - March 20, 2022

In The Last Cruze, artist LaToya Ruby Frazier chronicles the lives of workers at the General Motors plant in Lordstown, Ohio. Due to a confluence of circumstances, including the global outsourcing of labor, rapid automation, and the growing demand for electric cars, GM’s Lordstown facility stopped production in 2019 after more than fifty years of operation. This shutdown presented Lordstown facility workers with limited choices: relocate, sometimes leaving behind family and support networks, or find work elsewhere. Across the country, the trickle-down effect of economic decline and the corporate response to this decline disproportionately affects large groups of workers who have very little decision-making power within big corporations. And yet, their labor remains vital to the development and success of these businesses.

Through sixty-seven photographs, video, and an architectural installation that echoes the Lordstown assembly line, The Last Cruzeextends Frazier’s long-standing commitment to visualizing how working-class people—in places such as Flint, Michigan; her hometown of Braddock, Pennsylvania; and the Borinage mining region in Belgium—are impacted by industrial exploits, environmental injustice, and systemic racism.


California African American Museum

600 State Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90037, USA

213.744.7432

Open Tuesday - Saturday 10-5, Sunday 11-5



Brandon Lattu: Empirical, Textual, Contextual

October 2, 2021 - February 6, 2022

3824 Main St Riverside, CA +

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Brandon Lattu: Empirical, Textual, Contextual

October 2, 2021 - February 6, 2022

Set within the broad, mercurial image environment in which we create and consume, this timely and first survey exhibition of Brandon Lattu’s 25-year practice is a sensory and cerebral journey. Lattu re-versions and re-animates early work through contingency with recent and new projects, manifesting the through-lines of Lattu’s creative life.  The exhibition positions a variety of works, ranging from small, singular photographic prints, interactive light installations, animated slideshows, through to computer-carved sculptures. The exhibition, curated by Charlotte Cotton, highlights the restlessly experimental photographic approach in Lattu’s practice by constellating works into thematic clusters and flows through the California Museum of Photography’s galleries – amplifying conceptual freedom to push ideas of photography and animate the indexicality of the medium, regardless of its material form.


California Museum of Photography at UCR ARTS

3824 Main St Riverside, CA 92501

951.827.4787

ucrarts@ucr.edu

Open Tue-Sat 12-5, Sun 11-4, Closed Monday