LOCATIONS FILTERS

Mischa Leinkauf: Fiction of a Non-Entry

January 6 - February 6

102 Forsyth Street, New York, NY, USA +

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Mischa Leinkauf: Fiction of a Non-Entry

January 6 - February 6

signs and symbols is pleased to present Fiction of a Non-Entry, a video exhibition by Mischa Leinkauf as part of the gallery’s series of online-only solo presentations of video works.

Fiction of a Non-Entry depicts Leinkauf crossing the invisible borders on the ocean floor between Israel and Jordan or Egypt in the Red Sea and the Spanish enclave of Ceuta and Morocco in the Strait of Gibraltar. The respective regions are militarily guarded and secured by border fortifications, some of their fences protrude 30 meters from the banks into the water. Behind them, a landscape opens up to which visual separation has to surrender: the sea. By leaving the overland routes, Leinkauf traces the national interspaces. Where systematic gaps arise, he reveals the absurdity of control systems in a performative way. Instead of tearing down the architectures of isolation, Leinkauf overcomes the borders of the regions by walking in the dystopian-looking tranquility and expanse of the sea and opens up a space of absolute freedom.

“Despite the general hope that German reunification would also dismantle borders worldwide, the construction of national barriers has been experiencing an unanticipated renaissance for two decades. Whereas in 1989 there were 16 border fortifications in the world comparable to the Berlin Wall, today more than 70 barriers separate states and cities. Where borders are secured with military force and privileges of national identity are organized hierarchically, they reinforce the feeling of social separation and exclusion. Wars, struggles and conflicts are legitimized through national isolation. Walls, fences, passports and security agencies cement the spatial order and the power relations associated with it. A radical renunciation of this structure, however, does not transcend the mere dismantling of its material artefacts: the totality of borders has been anchored as a paradigm in the mind, although countless areas of human relations have long since been unaffected by territorial limitations.

Fiction of a Non-Entry sets politically motivated border demarcations visually out of action and brings a critique into play that is directed against topographical and symbolic barricading. In recourse to Situationist theory and practice, Leinkauf reveals the permeability and absurdity of border fortifications. Neither the natural resources of water, air and earth nor social lifestyles, solidarity and intimate relationships suggest spatial demarcation. Against this background, his works put the objectification and naturalness of boundaries up for discussion. Leinkauf‘s works refer to the commonality in what is separated visually. Where hermeticism seems oppressive, he peacefully infiltrates. His body becomes a body of resistance in the sphere of borders: by withdrawing himself, walking, circling and roaming, Mischa Leinkauf resists the architectures of isolation and subtly opens up a limitless space of possibilities for connection.”
— Almut Poppinga

*Please note that Leinkauf’s video will be viewable online from Wednesday, January 6 at 6:00pm until Saturday, February 6 at 6:00pm. Following the end of the exhibition, the video will only be accessible via private link and password. We trust that given our current circumstances, everyone will act in good faith and good will, understanding that these are primary artworks by our artists that are collected and which would otherwise be password protected.

Berlin born and based artist mischa leinkauf deals with the hidden possibilities of urban environments and various kinds of limitations of spaces through borders, rules and architecture. Through interventions in quasi-natural systems of order, he provokes situations that create temporary confusion and open up spaces for a possible recoding. His actions are subversive antics in the unruly and playful Debordian tradition of the dérive, but here the experiential immediacy and spontaneity is counterbalanced by a conceptual framework of precise planning and execution. Leinkauf is part of the artist duo Wermke/Leinkauf and has received numerous awards worldwide and exhibited internationally at venues such as Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo Japan, Helsinki Art Museum, Moderna Museet Stockholm, ZKM Karlsruhe, Kunstmuseum Bonn and Manifesta 11.


Press Release

signs and symbols

102 Forsyth Street, New York, NY, USA

917.880.8953

info@signsandsymbols.art

Open Wed-Sun 11-6


Jacques Henri Lartigue: Life in Color

December 20, 2020 - April 2, 2021

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Jacques Henri Lartigue: Life in Color

December 20, 2020 - April 2, 2021

His ‘visual diary’, is how Jacques Henri Lartigue called his photographic albums which he revised throughout 1970 – 1980.
This exhibition shows his photographs next to the original album pages.

The images of Jacques Henri Lartigue from the beginning of the 20th century were first exhibited by John Szarkowski in 1963 at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMa) in New York. At the time, the curator presented Lartigue as a mere amateur. This was the starting point for the artist to rethink his life, his way of working and his oeuvre.
Starting from the traditional practice associated with the amateur photographer – gathering his images in photo albums – Lartigue made an impressive body of work, laying out his life in an ensemble of 126 large sized folios.
When he was over 70 years old, Lartigue used these albums to revisit his life and mixed his own history with that of the century he lived in, while symbolically erasing painful episodes.




Robert Frank: Robert Frank: The Americans

October 17, 2020 - April 11, 2021

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA +

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Robert Frank: Robert Frank: The Americans

October 17, 2020 - April 11, 2021

First published in France in 1958 and in the United States in 1959—in the midst of the Cold War—Robert Frank’s The Americans is among the most influential photography books of the 20th century. The Addison is one of only four museums in the world to own a complete set of the images from the book.

In 1955–56, a Guggenheim Fellowship allowed the Swiss-born photographer to travel throughout the United States with the goal of creating a book that he described as a “visual study of a civilization.” Frank’s dark and grainy images are the work of an outsider looking in and reveal his ambivalence toward his adopted country. The eighty-three carefully sequenced photographs, edited down from more than twenty-seven thousand, are raw documentation of a country in transition. They celebrate its strengths as an emerging superpower while exposing the cracks in the veneer of optimism and opportunity that defined its postwar culture. As Jack Kerouac wrote in the introduction to the book, “Robert Frank, Swiss, unobtrusive, nice, with that little camera that he raises and snaps with one hand, he sucked a sad poem right out of America onto film.”

Frank’s unsentimental vision of a modern America that looked surprisingly lonely and dislocated was initially censured by the critics. However, the honest and poignant beauty captured in these images and his distinctively expressive and visceral style were soon embraced by younger photographers. More than a revelation of a specific moment in American history or a manifesto for a new photographic style, The Americans is a work of resonance that probes the defining and enduring dualities of American life and culture—hope and despair, affluence and want, freedom and limitation, community and isolation. Exploring the gulf between appearance and actuality, national ideals and regional specificity, American myth and street-level reality, these provocative and nuanced images ask what America is. ​​


Addison Gallery of American Art

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA 01810

978.749.4015

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5

Summer Hours: Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5; closed Mondays, July 4, and the month of August



An Incomplete History of Photography: 1860s to 1960s

October 17, 2020 - February 21, 2021

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA +

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An Incomplete History of Photography: 1860s to 1960s

October 17, 2020 - February 21, 2021

​​With the purchase of a photograph by Margaret Bourke-White in 1934, the Addison became one of the first museums in the United States to actively collect photography. In the almost 90 years since, the museum has acquired over 9,000 photographs. The selections displayed in this exhibition highlight some key moments in the development of the​ medium and in American history from the 1860s to the 1960s. The imagery includes Civil War battlefields, the American West, turn-of-the-century and Depression-era living conditions, geometric abstractions, and Civil Rights protests. Though photographic technology evolved over the course of the century, photographs served throughout the period as powerful agents of social change and vehicles of self-expression.


Addison Gallery of American Art

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA 01810

978.749.4015

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5

Summer Hours: Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5; closed Mondays, July 4, and the month of August



Marti Cormand (Brooklyn, NY), Oasa DuVerney (Brooklyn, Judith Eisler (Vienna, Austria and Warren, CT), Andy Mister (Beacon, William Powhida (Brooklyn, Gil Scullion (Middletown, and Diana Shpungin (Brooklyn: Twenty Twenty

October 12, 2020 - February 7, 2021

258 Main St Ridgefield, CT +

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Marti Cormand (Brooklyn, NY), Oasa DuVerney (Brooklyn, Judith Eisler (Vienna, Austria and Warren, CT), Andy Mister (Beacon, William Powhida (Brooklyn, Gil Scullion (Middletown, and Diana Shpungin (Brooklyn: Twenty Twenty

October 12, 2020 - February 7, 2021


Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum

258 Main St Ridgefield, CT 06877

203.438.4519

Open Wed-Mon 12-5, Sat 10-5



Audre Lorde, Robert Alexander: Powerful and Dangerous: The Words and Images of Audre Lorde

March 22, 2020 - February 15, 2021

2 Hylan Boulevard Staten Island, NY +

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Audre Lorde, Robert Alexander: Powerful and Dangerous: The Words and Images of Audre Lorde

March 22, 2020 - February 15, 2021

The Alice Austen House presents Audre Lorde in photographs and historic texts.

Powerful and Dangerous explores the intersection between language, activism and photographic messaging. The exhibition holds up a lens to the contemporary women’s, LGBTQ+, and Black Lives Matter movements and considers how Lorde’s words resonate today. Due to COVID-19 the exhibition has been extended with online programs until 2021. A series of public programs, including scholars talks, readings, outdoor film screenings and artist-led photo walks in the Staten Island neighborhood of Stapleton where Lorde’s home, now an LGBTQ Historic landmark, will take place through 2021.

This exhibition is curated by Victoria Munro with contributions by Clare Coss, Blanche Wiesen Cook, Jean Weisinger, Dagmar Shultz, Jennifer Abode and JEB. 

Scholars talks will include: Clare Coss, Blanche Wiesen Cook, Jewelle Gomez, Cheryl Clark, Elizabeth Lorde Rollins, M.D. and Alexis Pauline Gumbs.

Film presentations by Dagmar Schultz and Jennifer Abod with audio interview by Jennifer Abod.


Alice Austen House Museum

2 Hylan Boulevard Staten Island, NY 10305

718.816.4506

Open Tues--Fri 1:00 - 5:00 PM, Sat-Sun 11:00 - 5:00 Closed Monday


Mitch Epstein: Mitch Epstein: Property Rights

December 22, 2020 - February 28, 2021

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX +

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Mitch Epstein: Mitch Epstein: Property Rights

December 22, 2020 - February 28, 2021

In a series never shown before in a museum, pioneering color photographer Mitch Epstein (b. 1952) faces urgent, contemporary issues through his compelling photographs in Mitch Epstein: Property Rights. From Standing Rock protests to the Arizona and Texas borderlands, Epstein travels the country capturing images where public and private rights are often in conflict. Politics and citizenship, or environmental degradation and land rights, Epstein focuses on tough topics, helping us see overlapping, and often competing, histories and perspectives.

Epstein’s signature large-format photographs offer viewers a new way to consider the attention-grabbing headlines. His compositions celebrate beauty, light, and space, even as they raise questions about societal attitudes and priorities. Get lost in these 22 large-scale photographs as you challenge your perceptions and see modern history through the lens of an internationally renowned artist.


Amon Carter Museum of American Art

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX 76107

817.738.1933

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Thur 10-8, Sun 12-5



Group exhibition of Atlanta Photography Group members, curated by Executive Director, Judith Pishnery: DIRECTOR’S CUT

December 17, 2020 - January 30, 2021

75 Bennett Street Northwest, Atlanta, Georgia, +

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Group exhibition of Atlanta Photography Group members, curated by Executive Director, Judith Pishnery: DIRECTOR’S CUT

December 17, 2020 - January 30, 2021

Director’s Cut, a virtual group exhibition featuring photographic artists who breathe fresh perspectives and a new vitality into traditional photographic genres such as landscape, portraiture, abstracts, and still life. Director’s Cut is curated each year by APG executive director Judith Pishnery from members’ work presented to APG over the past year.

The virtual exhibition is free and open to the public.

All photographs in the exhibition are for sale, please visit the gallery viewing room for all images and information. You may contact us by email or phone for additional information and to purchase. gallery@atlantaphotographygroup.org

Exhibition: December 17, 2020 – continues online
Virtual Opening & Artist Talk: December 17, 2019, 7-9pm


Atlanta Photography Group

75 Bennett Street Northwest, Atlanta, Georgia, United States

404.605.0605

gallery@atlantaphotographygroup.org

Open Thurs-Sat 12-4, by appointment



Christopher Payne: Made in America

December 8, 2020 - February 5, 2021

521 W 26th, 2nd floor, New York, NY +

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Christopher Payne: Made in America

December 8, 2020 - February 5, 2021

In this era of service jobs and office work, most of us have never been inside a factory. Several decades of global outsourcing and a flood of cheap imports have decimated American factories and hollowed out once thriving communities. Today we have little idea where, or how, the shirt on our back is made. As we become increasingly immersed in the digital realm, we are losing touch with our analog roots. Yet we still live in a physical world and surround ourselves with material things, and many of these things are still made in America.

For the past ten years Christopher Payne has embarked on a photographic journey to learn more about American manufacturing and the industries that built this country. Payne gained access to a world that continues to thrive, albeit on a much smaller scale and, for the most part, out of public view. Some factories are new and showcase the latest technologies, some have survived by staying exactly the same, catering now to niche markets that value the “genuine article” produced on vintage equipment. Regardless of their differences, they all share the common bonds of craftsmanship and a commitment to quality that can never be outsourced.

 

This body of work is a celebration of the making of things, of the transformation of raw materials into useful objects, and the human skill and mechanical precision brought to bear on these materials that give them form and purpose. It is a deconstruction of the whole into its unseen constituent parts, revealing hidden moments of beauty in the choreography of production. It is also an homage to the people who do the actual work. They are a cross section of young and old, skilled and unskilled, recent immigrants, and veteran employees whose families have worked for generations in the same industry, sometimes in the same factory. Together, they share a quiet pride and dignity, proof that manual labor and craftsmanship still have value in today’s economy.

Payne carefully selected a handful of factories to communicate a broader view of American manufacturing: what it once was, where it is now, and what its future might hold. Manufacturing has been regarded traditionally as the symbol of the nation’s economic health, and its loss is seen as a threat to our collective soul and identity. Yet not all is so bleak. While there are industries pictured here that are barely hanging on, there are also creative adaptations and altogether new inventions that carve new pathways for American manufacturing. There is, for sure, a certain romance in the making of things, but it is not only nostalgic. These industries are living, breathing expressions of the American journey.

 

We welcome you to join us online for this exceptional selection that really is a culmination of many years of work by the artist. We will also have highlights from “How to Build a Guitar” at our Woodstock location this winter season! See you there!


Press Release

Benrubi Gallery

521 W 26th, 2nd floor, New York, NY 10001

212.888.6007

info@benrubigallery.com

Open Tues-Sat 10-6

Summer Hours: Mon-Fri 10-5



Glenna Jennings: At Table

December 3, 2020 - January 30, 2021

122 NW 8th Ave Portland, OR +

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Glenna Jennings: At Table

December 3, 2020 - January 30, 2021

In her ongoing series At Table, photographer Glenna Jennings focuses her lens on everyday moments shared over meals in dining rooms, kitchens, restaurants, and bars around the world. Her images capture subtle drama and humor, while also functioning as cultural artifacts and personal memories. Since 2005, Jennings has been traveling to locations throughout the United States, Mexico, Canada, China, and Europe, but in 2020 the global pandemic kept her close to home in Dayton, Ohio. Photographing smaller, socially-distanced gatherings provided new imagery to the series “that will serve as a reminder of the year we struggled —separately and together—to survive a global pandemic while putting food (and often drink) on the table.”


Blue Sky Gallery

122 NW 8th Ave Portland, OR 97209

503.225.0210

Open Tues-Sun 12-5



Aaron Turner, Widline Cadet, Jasmine Clarke, Nadiya I. Nacorda: Women of the African Diaspora: Identity, Place, Migration, Immigration

December 3, 2020 - January 30, 2021

122 NW 8th Ave Portland, OR +

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Aaron Turner, Widline Cadet, Jasmine Clarke, Nadiya I. Nacorda: Women of the African Diaspora: Identity, Place, Migration, Immigration

December 3, 2020 - January 30, 2021

Blue Sky is pleased to present Women of the African Diaspora: Identity, Place, Migration, and Immigration, an exhibition curated by Aaron Turner and featuring photographic work by Widline Cadet, Jasmine Clarke, and Nadiya I. Nacorda. Through photography, these three artists reflect upon their experiences navigating contemporary life in the United States and beyond as women of the African Diaspora, while also contributing to the larger conversation surrounding inclusion and exclusion within the visual narrative of art history.


Blue Sky Gallery

122 NW 8th Ave Portland, OR 97209

503.225.0210

Open Tues-Sun 12-5



Erik Hoffner: Ice Visions

October 24, 2020 - March 6, 2021

10 Vernon St Brattleboro, VT +

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Erik Hoffner: Ice Visions

October 24, 2020 - March 6, 2021

I’ve loved snowflakes since the day, as a child, I learned that no two are alike—millions and millions of them in a storm and no twins, every crystalline structure a unique expression of its own making. Erik Hoffner taught me a new lesson in the magic of nature: that thin sheets of freshly formed ice are without peer.

Hoffner is the Snowflake Bentley of our generation. His photographic creations capture patterns in the ice that forms overnight atop the holes bored by ice fishermen on the waterways of New England. Each rondel of new ice possesses its own internal, pictorial logic and materiality. Hoffner’s photographs open a viewing space to consider the dynamics of nature in its unlimited expressive and metaphoric potential.

— Mara Williams, Chief Curator

 

 

Ice Visions is an informal collaboration between myself, the ice fishing community, and elemental forces. When fishing holes refreeze overnight, they create fertile ground for nature’s wild artistic side, and these perfectly augered circles become worlds at once interstellar and cellular, dreamlike and tactile.

The images on display depict ice designs I’ve documented during 20 years of exploring New England lakes and ponds. In the morning light, with tiny bubbles from below fixed in place by several inches of new ice, these scenes come to life as eyes, galaxies, stars, cells, and more when rendered in black and white.

Due to milder than usual temperatures during the past winter, on many mornings I found barely a skin of new ice covering the prior day’s fishing holes. Bubbles pooled up at the surface before freezing, creating striking new kinds of formations I’d never seen before, ones that perhaps reveal the fingerprint of a warming climate.

— Erik Hoffner


Brattleboro Museum & Art Center

10 Vernon St Brattleboro, VT 05301

802.257.0124

info@brattleboromuseum.org

Open Wed-Mon 11-5