LOCATIONS FILTERS

Melanie King: Ancient Light

September 1 - October 10

3 W Homestead Ave, Collingswood, NJ, USA +

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Melanie King: Ancient Light

September 1 - October 10

TBA


Big Day Film Collective

3 W Homestead Ave, Collingswood, NJ, USA

bigday@bigdayfilmcollective.com

Open Saturday & Sunday 12–6pm, Monday–Friday by appointment

Summer Hours: LIMITED until September due to Covid19 CDC restrictions. Please follow us on Instagram @bigdayfilmcollective for updates.



Shannon Taggart: Séance: Photographs by Shannon Taggart

August 31 - December 17

1000 Hilltop Circle Baltimore, MD +

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Shannon Taggart: Séance: Photographs by Shannon Taggart

August 31 - December 17

For the past twenty years American artist Shannon Taggart (born 1975) has documented Spiritualist practices and communities in the United States, England, and Europe. The resulting body of work, Séance, examines the relationship of Spiritualism to human celebrity, its connections to art, science, and technology, and its intrinsic bond with the medium of photography. This exhibition presents forty-seven haunting images from the series, revealing the emotional, psychological, and physical dimensions of Spiritualism in the 21st century.

Shannon Taggart is an artist and author based in St. Paul, Minnesota, USA. Her photographs have been exhibited and featured internationally, including within the publications TIME, New York Times Magazine, Discover, and Newsweek. Her work has been recognized by Nikon, Magnum Photos and the Inge Morath Foundation, American Photography and the Alexia Foundation for World Peace. Taggart’s monograph, SÉANCE (Fulgur Press, 2019) was listed as one of TIME magazine’s ‘Best Photobooks of 2019.’

This exhibition is organized in collaboration with the Pensacola Museum of Art.


Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

1000 Hilltop Circle Baltimore, MD 21250

410.455.2270

Open Mon-Fri 10-4:30, Thur 12-8, Sat-Sun 12-5


Sam Abell, Alice Austen, Mack Cohen, Stephen Gill, Lonnie Graham, Justine Kurland, Lori Nix, Bill Owens, Sheron Rupp, Collier Schorr, Mike Slack: The Photographer in the Garden

September 11 - December 30

2 Hylan Boulevard Staten Island, NY +

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Sam Abell, Alice Austen, Mack Cohen, Stephen Gill, Lonnie Graham, Justine Kurland, Lori Nix, Bill Owens, Sheron Rupp, Collier Schorr, Mike Slack: The Photographer in the Garden

September 11 - December 30

Since the invention of the medium, photographers have been drawn by the allure of flowers. This group exhibition excerpted from Aperture’s book The Photographer in the Garden celebrates the rich history of artists working in the garden as a site of inspiration and reinvention.


Alice Austen House Museum

2 Hylan Boulevard Staten Island, NY 10305

718.816.4506

Open Tues--Fri 1:00 - 5:00 PM, Sat-Sun 11:00 - 5:00 Closed Monday



Jerry Spearman: 9/11 Commemoration

September 11 - December 30

2 Hylan Boulevard Staten Island, NY +

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Jerry Spearman: 9/11 Commemoration

September 11 - December 30

At the beginning of 2021, cultural and preservation leaders met at the 9/11 Memorial Museum to discuss cultural institutions’ response to the 20th anniversary and plan performances to provide our community with spaces to gather and reflect on the power of the arts in NYC to heal. The Alice Austen House will join many other cultural institutions to light our building in blue on Saturday, September 11 and be exhibiting vintage Landmarks Commission photographs of Staten Island firehouses from September 11 through December 30 in our contemporary sunroom gallery.


Alice Austen House Museum

2 Hylan Boulevard Staten Island, NY 10305

718.816.4506

Open Tues--Fri 1:00 - 5:00 PM, Sat-Sun 11:00 - 5:00 Closed Monday



Focus: Power, Agency, and Objectivity in Early Photography

August 26 - December 23

Oberlin College, 87 N Main St, Oberlin, Ohio +

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Focus: Power, Agency, and Objectivity in Early Photography

August 26 - December 23

British photographer Julia Margaret Cameron (1815–1879) once asked: “what is focus, and who has the right to say what focus is the legitimate focus?” Cameron’s question lies at the heart of this exhibition, which traces the early history of photography while probing how myths surrounding the perceived objectivity of this new medium conceal the power dynamics inherent in who photographs, what is photographed, and how photographs are viewed and understood.

A woman who came to photography in her late 40s, Cameron was disparaged by male art critics for the soft focus of her images, an intentional artistic choice often dismissed as a sign of technical ineptitude. This critique speaks to a fundamental tension that dominated discourses on photography in the 1800s: was it primarily a scientific tool best used for precise documentation, or a form of artistic expression on par with well-established genres such as painting? In other words, are photographs, by their very nature, truthful? Or can they manipulate and distort reality?

After an introductory section on early photographic technologies, this exhibition explores these questions through three themes: portraiture, European photographs of faraway lands recently—or soon to be—colonized, and images of the American West. In each case, the photographs on view push us to consider the visible and invisible systems of power that led to their creation, and how photographers’ decisions support or subvert dominant historical narratives.

Organized by Alexandra Letvin, assistant curator of European and American art


Allen Memorial Art Museum

Oberlin College, 87 N Main St, Oberlin, Ohio 44074

440.775.8665

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5


Laura Liverani: SUMO GIRLS

July 12 - October 2

143 Ludlow St New York, NY +

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Laura Liverani: SUMO GIRLS

July 12 - October 2

The ancient practice of Japanese sumo dates back to the prehistoric era, yet professional sumo remains exclusive to men. Women are prohibited from even stepping foot in the dohyō, the sacred ring where sumotori wrestle. Despite this, female sumo wrestlers do exist even if not yet acknowledged by the ranks of the professional sumo.

Women sumo, or joshi-sumo in Japanese, is a fairly recent amateur sport that has been around for only a handful of decades. The International Sumo Federation, the main organization supporting joshi-sumo, was founded in 1992, while the first major women sumo championships date back to the mid 1990s. There are women sumo teams in Japan as well as in countries such as Mongolia, Russia, and Germany; and international competitions are now held annually. Sumo wrestling has never been featured at the Olympics, although the Tokyo based International Sumo Federation aims to have it included one day.

Sumo wrestling is believed to have originated in Japan as an agricultural ritual to Shinto deities. Centuries later, the national sport of Japan is still governed by ancient traditions, rituals and stringent regulations such as weight and height requirements.

Additionally, aspiring sumo wrestlers are required to undertake a mandatory nine years of education under the instruction of oyakata (former wrestlers). The women ban is also rooted in Shinto beliefs; according to Shinto tradition women are impure because they menstruate and would therefore contaminate the dohyō by even touching it.

Joshi-sumo are therefore restricted to amateur clubs within schools and universities such as the Asahi University Sumo Club. In 2018, Liverani visited the club which at the time had nine female members, making it the largest joshi-sumo team in Japan. Training is unisex and the mixed team trains for more than two hours together on weekdays. After the stretching and general exercise routine, the girls wrestle against each other and against the boys. Size does not matter you don’t have to be extra-large to become a sumotori. Both during practice and competitions, women wear the mawashi (sumo loin-cloth belt) over t-shirt and shorts, or over a leotard, as opposed to naked skin. Training takes place in the dohyō, that is swept and sprinkled with sand and water regularly.

 

BIOGRAPHY

Laura Liverani is a documentary photographer and university lecturer based between Tokyo and Italy. She holds an MA in Arts and Media at the University of Bologna and in Photographic Studies at the University of Westminster, London. Laura works internationally on independent projects and a variety of commissions, ranging from editorial to commercial assignments. Her work is featured in magazines, books, catalogues and exhibitions worldwide.


Press Release

Anastasia Photo

143 Ludlow St New York, NY 10002

212.677.9725

kaley@anastasia-photo.com

Open Tues-Sat 10-6



Oliviero Toscani: Photographs of Andy Warhol

September 16 - September 30

Via Solferino, 44, Milan, Metropolitan City of Milan, Italy +

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Oliviero Toscani: Photographs of Andy Warhol

September 16 - September 30

Photographs of Andy Warhol, the solo show by the photographer Oliviero Toscani presents a selection of previously unpublished photographs. Shot between 1971 and 1973 at Andy Warhol’s Factory in New York, these photographs are shown to the public for the very first time.

The exhibition is curated by Luca Beatrice and displays more than 50 unpublished photos selected by Toscani himself.


Press Release

Antonio Colombo Arte Contemporanea

Via Solferino, 44, Milan, Metropolitan City of Milan, Italy

3902.2.906.0171

Open Tuesday-Friday 10-1, 3-7, Saturday 3-7



Fragments of Epic Memory

September 1, 2021 - February 21, 2022

317 Dundas Street West, Toronto, Ontario M5T 1G4, Canada +

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Fragments of Epic Memory

September 1, 2021 - February 21, 2022

Fragments of Epic Memory will invite visitors to experience the multiple ways of encountering the Caribbean and its diaspora, from the period following emancipation through today.

The first exhibition organized by the AGO’s new Department of Arts of Global Africa and the Diaspora, it will blend historical and contemporary narratives, presenting more than 200 photographs from the AGO’s Montgomery Collection of Caribbean Photographs alongside paintings, sculpture, and video works by modern and contemporary Caribbean artists that show how the region’s histories are constantly revisited and reimagined through artistic production over time.

Fragments of Epic Memory is curated by Julie Crooks, Curator of Arts of Global Africa and the Diaspora and will feature a new commission by Sandra Brewster and art works by Ebony G. Patterson, Frank Bowling, and Manuel Mathieu to name just a few.

 

Image Caption:

Paul Anthony Smith, Untitled, 7 Women, 2019. Unique picotage on inkjet print, coloured pencil, spray paint on museum board, 101.6 x 127 cm. The Hott Collection, New York © Paul Anthony Smith. Image courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York


Art Gallery of Ontario

317 Dundas Street West, Toronto, Ontario M5T 1G4, Canada

877.225.4246

Open Tues-Sun 10-5:30, Wed 10-8:30


Walter Iooss Jr.: Golden Hour: Olympians Photographed by Walter Iooss Jr.

July 9 - October 4

2 South Pack Square, Asheville, NC, USA +

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Walter Iooss Jr.: Golden Hour: Olympians Photographed by Walter Iooss Jr.

July 9 - October 4

Golden Hour: Olympians Photographed by Walter Iooss Jr. highlights dozens of photographer Walter Iooss Jr.’s images from the Asheville Art Museum’s Collection. Over his 60-year career, Iooss (born Temple, TX 1943) has captured hundreds of celebrated athletes training for and playing their sports, as portraits, and a select few as they prepared for the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. He began his career shooting for Sports Illustrated and has contributed to the magazine for more than 50 years.

Golden Hour is on view in conjunction with the exhibitions Artistic Tribute: Representation of the Athlete and Precious Medals: Gold, Silver & Bronze. These exhibitions are organized by the Asheville Art Museum and curated by Whitney Richardson, associate curator.

Click here to learn more about Golden Hour.


Asheville Art Museum

2 South Pack Square, Asheville, NC, USA

828.2.53..3227

Open Wed-Mon 11-6, Thur 11-9


Antonio Pulgarin: Lost Throughout The Pages (Whispers of The Caballeros)

September 8 - October 6

126 Baxter St. New York, NY +

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Antonio Pulgarin: Lost Throughout The Pages (Whispers of The Caballeros)

September 8 - October 6

Lost Throughout the Pages (Whispers of The Caballeros), the debut exhibition of Baxter St’s 2020 artist in residence Antonio Pulgarín aims to democratize the history of beefcake imagery by including the lens and experience of the artist’s queer Latinx identity. Featuring new images and collages drawn from two decades of queer archival imagery, each work incorporates textile patterns, colors, and printed source materials representative of Pulgarín’s Colombian culture and heritage to expand upon the historically white queer canon.

For Lost Throughout the Pages (Whispers of The Caballeros), the artist has created a new, inclusive archive of queer imagery, endeavoring to create an opportunity for others like himself to feel seen. The fifteen new works on view include and honor the queer BIPOC community, which has not been historically visible or represented. Pulgarín merges deconstructed queer archival images from the 1980s through the present day with aspects of his Colombian cultural identity, celebrating the two communities he proudly represents. Pulgarín uses the red, blue and yellow primary colors of the Colombian flag and patterns of textiles and weavings that reflect the ponchos and sombrero vueltiaos typically worn in Colombia and throughout Latinx communities. The collaged works are adhered to surfaces such as bamboo, acrylic glass, adhesive vinyl, and printed cyanotypes on fabric, paying homage to the way photography was presented in his childhood home—taped or pinned to a refrigerator, mirror, or religious statue. Pulgarín continues this tradition by veering away from the formal framed image to present his work in new ways.

As a teen, Pulgarín turned to queer photography as a way to make sense of and come to terms with his identity. He immediately became fascinated by the only queer images available to him at the time—beefcake images that represented liberation, yet were hypermasculine and centered and idealized white, athletic bodies. The artist became painfully aware that his larger body type and cultural identity were not represented. Examining the history of beefcake photography more closely, he felt emboldened to challenge its exclusive nature and homogeneous standard of beauty—standards the  queer community is still trying to unpack today.

“I was honored that Baxter St gave me this opportunity to further develop my practice and to work with a diverse and talented cohort of artists,” says Pulgarín. “I hope to inspire the next generation to add to the queer archive by representing their full selves so that we can constantly build on what it means to be queer in America. I want the viewer to walk away from this exhibition feeling comfortable with the ideas of reflecting, unpacking and challenging our histories in order to move forward as a community.”

 

Antonio Pulgarín (b. 1989) is a Colombian-American lens-based artist who utilizes photography, photographic collage, and mixed media in his practice. Pulgarín mounted his first solo exhibition at Kingsborough Art Museum in the fall of 2019. Pulgarín’s work has been featured in exhibitions at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art, Brooklyn Museum, Aperture Foundation, Longwood Art Gallery, the Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art at SUNY New Paltz, BRIC, and Musée de l’Elysée in Lausanne, Switzerland. His work has received honors from YoungArts, The Scholastic Art and Writing Awards, EnFoco, The Magenta Foundation, Latin American Fotografia, American Photography, and PDN Photo Annual.

Pulgarín’s work has been featured in publications such as ViceUnSeen MagazineVisual Arts JournalBESESlateLensCulture and The Huffington Post. He received his BFA in Photography from the School of Visual Arts and is currently based in Seattle, Washington. Pulgarín was named a 2019 Fellow of the AIM Fellowship program at the Bronx Museum of the Arts. Pulgarín will also be showcasing this work at the Bronx Calling: The Fifth AIM Biennial from October 20, 2021 – January 16, 2022.


Baxter St at CCNY

126 Baxter St. New York, NY 10013

212.260.9927

baxterst@cameraclubny.org

Open Tues-Sat 12-6

Summer Hours: Closed July 3rd, August 7-11



Gary Burnley, Al J Thompson: Gary Burnley: The Known World AL J Thompson: Remnants of an Exodus

September 2 - October 2

122 NW 8th Ave Portland, OR +

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Gary Burnley, Al J Thompson: Gary Burnley: The Known World AL J Thompson: Remnants of an Exodus

September 2 - October 2

Blue Sky is pleased to announce the 2020 Critical Mass Solo Exhibition, The Known World by Gary Burnley, and  Remnants of an Exodus, an exhibition by Al J Thompson featuring photographs from his first monograph of the same name.


Blue Sky Gallery

122 NW 8th Ave Portland, OR 97209

503.225.0210

Open Tues-Sun 12-5


Patrick Nagatani: Chain Reaction: The Photography of Patrick Nagatani

June 27 - October 10

1 Museum Drive Greenwich, CT +

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Patrick Nagatani: Chain Reaction: The Photography of Patrick Nagatani

June 27 - October 10

The Bruce Museum will present the exhibition, Patrick Nagatani: Chain Reaction, on view from June 27, 2021, through October 10, 2021. The exhibition will feature the entire Nuclear Enchantment series, a powerful body of work made between 1988 and 1993, which deals with the history of nuclear weapons development in New Mexico, as well as the effects of this industry on the people and places there. As a Japanese-American, this was a particularly resonant subject for Nagatani, whose parents were both put in internment camps during WWII, and whose father’s family hailed from outside of Hiroshima. Originally planned for August 2020, the exhibition was intended to coincide with the 75thanniversary of the U.S. bombings of the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but was delayed due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Consisting of 40 photographs, the series presents a politicized intervention as Nagatani constructs multilayered and wildly imaginative images that unsettle our understanding of this complex time and place in U.S. history. The jarring juxtaposition of ancient symbols and figures from Japanese and Native American culture alongside uranium mining facilities and contaminated deposit sites creates a visual discord that speaks to this complexity. At once harrowing and humorous, these artworks participate in the ever-relevant debate weighing the benefits of scientific and technological progress against the preservation of cultural history and the natural world. The exhibition will also feature artifacts from the Bruce Museum historical collection, including Native American objects, as well as a Soviet-issued gas mask and Geiger counter, echoing the dissonance that the photographs create, and enhancing the exhibition experience for museum visitors.

The exhibition is curated by Stephanie Guyet, an independent curator and former Zvi Grunberg Resident Fellow for the Bruce Museum.

The Bruce Museum is grateful for exhibition support from the Charles M. and Deborah G. Royce Exhibition Fund and the Connecticut Office of the Arts.


Bruce Museum

1 Museum Drive Greenwich, CT 06830

203.869.0376

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5