LOCATIONS FILTERS

An Enduring Icon: Notre-Dame Cathedral

July 23 - October 20

1200 Getty Center Dr Los Angeles, CA +

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An Enduring Icon: Notre-Dame Cathedral

July 23 - October 20

On April 15, 2019, an accidental fire ravaged the 850-year-old cathedral of Notre-Dame in Paris. In recognition of this historic event and its aftermath, the exhibition offers a glimpse into the history and art of this architectural and religious icon. Paintings, photographs, prints, and rare books elucidate the importance of the cathedral in European art history from its construction in the Middle Ages to its restoration in the mid-1800s, including its central place in Victor Hugo’s novel The Hunchback of Notre-Dame. Curated by Anne-Lise Desmas.


Getty Center

1200 Getty Center Dr Los Angeles, CA 90049

310.440.7300

Open Tues-Sun 10-5:30, Fri-Sat 10-9

Summer Hours:



Mira Burack: Sleeping Between the Sun and the Moon

June 22 - August 31

516 Central Ave SW Albuquerque, NM +

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Mira Burack: Sleeping Between the Sun and the Moon

June 22 - August 31


516 ARTS

516 Central Ave SW Albuquerque, NM 87102

505.242.1445

info@516arts.org

Open Tues-Sat 12-5pm


Mary McCartney: Mary McCartney: From the Print Drawer

May 23 - August 1

241 Chartres St New Orleans, LA +

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Mary McCartney: Mary McCartney: From the Print Drawer

May 23 - August 1


Press Release

A Gallery for Fine Photography

241 Chartres St New Orleans, LA 70130

504.568.1313

joshuamann@att.net

Open Thur-Mon 10:30-5


Arden Surdam: Offal

June 27 - July 28

9 Clinton Street, New York, NY, +

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Arden Surdam: Offal

June 27 - July 28


ABXY

9 Clinton Street, New York, NY, United States

1.646.964.5510

support@abxy.co

Open Wed-Sat 12-7, Sun 12-5


Harlem: In Situ

March 30 - July 31

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA +

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Harlem: In Situ

March 30 - July 31

​​Harlem is as much a place as a myth. Throughout the 20th century, this northern Manhattan neighborhood has been written into history as many things; however, in this context, Harlem is ultimately and unceasingly, a black creative mecca, a place whose rich social and cultural fabric has been woven out of the abundance of people of African descent worldwide who have come together in its streets, salons, parks, restaurants, and clubs, influencing generations of artists, musicians, and writers. Harlem: In Situ explores the depth and complexity of this renowned neighborhood, highlighting the work of some of the most important visual artists working from the late 1920s through today. Initially inspired by the Addison’s trove of Harlem street-photography, which includes significant bodies of work such as Harlem Document (1935) by Aaron Siskind, Harlem Heroes (1930–1960) by Carl van Vechten, Harlem, USA (1975–1979) by Dawoud Bey (a three-time Elson Artist-in-Residence at Phillips Academy), 1920s–1950s (Harlem) by Lucien Aigner, and The Sweet Flypaper of Life (1984) by Roy DeCarava, this show also includes prints from the collection by Romare Bearden, Elizabeth Catlett, James Lesesne Wells, and Vincent D. Smith, as well as several key works by nearly a dozen artists, working across time and media, including Charles Alton, Jordan Casteel, Aaron Douglas, Miatta Kawinzi, Alice Neel, Lorraine O’Grady, and Kehinde Wiley, that will come to the Addison as loans from sister institutions. These artists and their works investigate the legacy and trajectory of Harlem, which encompasses mass migration, opulence, cultural renaissance, depression, demise, empowerment, pride, and gentrification.


Press Release

Addison Gallery of American Art

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA 01810

978.749.4015

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5

Summer Hours: Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5; closed Mondays, July 4, and the month of August



John Goodman: John Goodman: not recent color

April 13 - July 31

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA +

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John Goodman: John Goodman: not recent color

April 13 - July 31

Comprised of brilliant color photographs, the majority of which have never before been exhibited, John Goodman: not recent color examines the American cultural landscape through the coming of age of a young artist in the 1970s and 1980s.

Made from recently rediscovered Kodachrome and Ektachrome slides, these photographs transport viewers to another time with their richly saturated colors and cinematic views. Piercing yet tender images shot in diners, bowling alleys, and darkened theaters, outside phone booths and gas stations, and on city streets and sidewalks conjure moments in individual lives and social interactions that together tell a story about the slowly changing social fabric of Goodman’s studio neighborhood in Boston––and the country at large.

Predating the work for which Goodman is best known—poignant and gritty photographs capturing subjects such as Boston’s famed Combat Zone, backstage at the Boston Ballet, the streets of Havana, and a Times Square boxing gym—these early works announce a lifelong interest in recording fleeting moments, as well as the more abstract and enduring essence of places and people. ​​​​


Press Release

Addison Gallery of American Art

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA 01810

978.749.4015

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5

Summer Hours: Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5; closed Mondays, July 4, and the month of August



Joe Vitone: Joe Vitone: Family Records

April 27 - October 27

One South High Akron, OH +

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Joe Vitone: Joe Vitone: Family Records

April 27 - October 27

Joe Vitone: Family Records is an ongoing series of portraits of photographer Joe Vitone’s relatives living in and around Akron, Ohio. Begun in 1998, this body of work documents evolving interpersonal connections between parents and children, siblings, spouses, cousins and other relations within working class communities of the Rust Belt region. Shot each summer when the artist—now based in Austin, Texas—travels back to Ohio, this series features scenes from festivities such as birthday parties and weddings as well as intimate portraits set outside homes and workplaces. Touched by celebrations and struggles including marriage, divorce, addiction, new homes, unemployment, new jobs and babies, the lives of Vitone’s relatives reflect experiences common to families across the United States.

Vitone prints his images, which he captures using 8 x 10-inch and 4 x 5-inch view cameras, in both black and white and color. Featuring 55 works photographed in Akron proper, as well as in surrounding communities including Barberton, Stow and Marshallville, Family Records marks the first time a selection from this series has been exhibited in Northeast Ohio.

Joe Vitone: Family Records is organized by the Akron Art Museum with support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, Ohio Arts Council and the Char and Chuck Fowler Family Foundation.


Akron Art Museum

One South High Akron, OH 44308

330.376.9185

Open Wed-Sun 11-5, Thur 11-9


Sara Cwynar: Gilded Age

June 9 - November 10

258 Main St Ridgefield, CT +

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Sara Cwynar: Gilded Age

June 9 - November 10

The Aldrich presents the first East Coast exhibition of artist Sara Cwynar (b. 1985), whose practice spans photography, video, installation and bookmaking and surveys the transitory object-life of visual matter in our time of image infatuation. The exhibition features new and recent work by the artist. Using an accumulative archive of images and objects, culled from libraries, public archives, dollar stores, and eBay, Cwynar combines archival imagery and out-of-date objects with new digital technologies and archaic analogue processes to expose how images are produced, trafficked and mimed over time. Cwynar’s first museum publication, with an essay by Amy Smith-Stewart, the exhibition’s curator, accompanies the show.


Press Release

Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum

258 Main St Ridgefield, CT 06877

203.438.4519

Open Wed-Mon 12-5, Sat 10-5


Collier Schorr: Collier Schorr: Stonewall at 50

May 19 - September 30

2 Hylan Boulevard Staten Island, NY +

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Collier Schorr: Collier Schorr: Stonewall at 50

May 19 - September 30

The Alice Austen House presents ‘Stonewall at 50’, an exhibition by artist Collier Schorr. 15 intergenerational portraits of LGBTQ+ activists and artists, celebrates the 50th Anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising. This project, generated by partnerships made in the Stonewall 50 Consortium, an organization committed to producing programming, exhibitions, and educational materials related to the Stonewall uprising and/or the history of the LGBTQ civil rights movement, brings together participants of the 1969 Stonewall Uprising with activists who have followed in their footsteps.

As part of the heady New York art world of the late ‘80s and early ‘90s, Collier Schorr’s early work mined the vernacular of postmodernism to create photographs that toe the line between documentary and fiction. Often using her subjects allegorically, Schorr’s work navigates the auspices of identity politics to ask beguiling questions about the nomenclature of selfhood. By introducing autobiographical referents and post-appropriation aesthetics into her practice, Schorr’s ongoing body of work negotiates the fluid nature of authorship and performance in relation to portraiture.

Produced by Paul Moakley and Victoria Munro

Funded by the  Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual ArtsRobert Mapplethorpe FoundationThe Shelley and Donald Rubin FoundationHumanities NYNew York Community TrustNew York City Department of Cultural Affairs and the National Endowment for the Arts


Alice Austen House Museum

2 Hylan Boulevard Staten Island, NY 10305

718.816.4506

Open Tues-Sun 11-5


Sara VanDerBeek

June 27 - August 31

49 Geary St San Francisco, CA +

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Sara VanDerBeek

June 27 - August 31


Altman Siegel Gallery

49 Geary St San Francisco, CA 94108

415.576.9300

Open Tues-Fri 10-6, Sat 11-5


Artists Respond: American Art and the Vietnam War, 1965-1975

March 15 - August 18

Eighth & F St NW Washington, DC +

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Artists Respond: American Art and the Vietnam War, 1965-1975

March 15 - August 18

How the Vietnam War changed American art.

By the late 1960s, the United States was in pitched conflict both in Vietnam, against a foreign power, and at home—between Americans for and against the war, for and against the status quo. Artists Respond: American Art and the Vietnam War, 1965–1975 presents art created amid this turmoil, spanning the period from President Lyndon B. Johnson’s fateful decision to deploy U.S. ground troops to South Vietnam in 1965 to the fall of Sài Gònten years later.

Artists Respond is the most comprehensive exhibition to examine the contemporary impact of the Vietnam War on American art. The exhibition is unprecedented in its historical scale and depth. It brings together nearly 100 works by fifty-eight of the most visionary and provocative artists of the period. Galvanized by the moral urgency of the Vietnam War, these artists reimagined the goals and uses of art, affecting developments in multiple movements and media: photography, painting, sculpture, printmaking, performance, installation, documentary art, and conceptualism. This exhibition presents both well-known and rarely discussed works, and offers an expanded view of American art during the war, introducing a diversity of previously marginalized artistic voices, including women, African Americans, Latinos, and Asian Americans. The exhibition makes vivid an era in which artists endeavored to respond to the turbulent times and openly questioned issues central to American civic life.

Artists Respond: American Art and the Vietnam War, 1965–1975 is organized by Melissa Ho, curator of twentieth-century art at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

The exhibition is presented in conjunction with an installation by internationally acclaimed artist Tiffany Chung. Tiffany Chung: Vietnam, Past Is Prologue, probes the legacies of the Vietnam War and its aftermath through maps, paintings, and videos that share the stories of former Vietnamese refugees.


Press Release

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Eighth & F St NW Washington, DC 20004

202.633.1000

Open daily 11:30-7



David Levinthal: American Myth & Memory: David Levinthal Photographs

June 7 - October 14

Eighth & F St NW Washington, DC +

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David Levinthal: American Myth & Memory: David Levinthal Photographs

June 7 - October 14

Populated with toy cowboys and cavalry, Barbie dolls and baseball players, David Levinthal’s photographs reference iconic images and events that shaped postwar American society. Despite their playful veneer, Levinthal’s images provide a lens through which to examine the myths and stereotypes lurking within our most beloved pastimes and enduring heroes. In doing so, Levinthal encourages us to consider the stories we tell about ourselves—what it means to be strong, beautiful, masculine, feminine, and ultimately, American.

American Myth & Memory: David Levinthal Photographs brings together six of the artist’s best-known bodies of work to explore some myths found in American popular culture and their place in our collective memory. Created between 1984 and 2018, the series Modern Romance, American Beauties, Wild West, Barbie, Baseball, and History all explore quintessentially American themes and imagery. The exhibition includes more than 70 color photographs drawn from two recent gifts to SAAM. The exhibition is organized by Joanna Marsh, SAAM’s Deputy Education Chair, Head of Interpretation and Audience Research.


Smithsonian American Art Museum

Eighth & F St NW Washington, DC 20004

202.633.1000

Open daily 11:30-7