LOCATIONS FILTERS

Lodoe Laura: 158

August 3 - September 15

Reception: Fri September 7, 6-9pm

1821 West Hubbard St Chicago, IL +

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Lodoe Laura: 158

August 3 - September 15

Reception: Fri September 7, 6-9pm

Filter Photo is pleased to present 158, a solo exhibition of work by Lodoe Laura, at Filter Space gallery. In the last ten years, 158 people have self-immolated in protest of the conditions inside the Tibetan Autonomous Region in China. In an independent report done by Freedom House in 2017, Tibet was second only to Syria in its lack of civil liberties. Authorities inside Tibet write a different history, one of a utopian Shangri-La in the Himalayas. Working with the archives of Tibetan activists and advocacy groups, Lodoe Laura conducted research into the troubling trending practice of self-immolation in the Tibetan community, and collected photographs of the self-immolated. These images, usually recovered by activists as low-resolution cell phone images, function as testimony of an act of resistance, and as a critique of the Chinese government’s account of life inside Tibet. Each portrait was printed by hand using handmade charcoal ink. Laura collected charcoal incense, used in Tibetan Buddhist smoke offering rituals, from the diaspora community following their prayers. The ritual charcoal was ground, sifted, dried, and mixed by hand with traditional ink making mediums, then hand printed onto paper; a labor-intensive process that took several months to complete.


Filter Space

1821 West Hubbard St Chicago, IL 60622

info@filterfestival.com

Open Mon-Sat 11-5



Brenda Bancel: Continuing Work In India and Indonesia

June 1 - August 30

555 E 2nd St Boston, MA +

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Brenda Bancel: Continuing Work In India and Indonesia

June 1 - August 30


555 Gallery

555 E 2nd St Boston, MA 02127

857.496.7234

gallery@555gallery.com

Open Tues-Fri 10-5:30, Sat 12-5



Ben Depp: Bayou’s End

April 5 - September 27

241 Chartres St New Orleans, LA +

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Ben Depp: Bayou’s End

April 5 - September 27

Bayou’s End, A Gallery for Fine Photography’s exhibition of photographs by Ben Depp, captures the rapidly changing landscape of Southern Louisiana from the birds-eye perspective of a motor-powered paraglider piloted by the artist himself. The incredible risk required to make these photographs is not always apparent in the images themselves; Depp must navigate changing wind conditions and avoid obstacles while not dropping his camera or being dropped himself, often while flying mere feet above the water’s surface. Depp’s photographs function as both documentary and fine art, contributing meaningfully to the ongoing dialogue on Louisiana’s wetland loss while simultaneously transcending this context.


A Gallery for Fine Photography

241 Chartres St New Orleans, LA 70130

504.568.1313

joshuamann@att.net

Open Thur-Mon 10:30-5



Jerry Birchfield: Asleep in the Dust

March 24 - September 23

One South High Akron, OH +

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Jerry Birchfield: Asleep in the Dust

March 24 - September 23

Photography has a weighty history as an art medium and as a tool to record our daily lives. We tend to seek value in what pictures are of rather than in physical photographic objects. The work of Jerry Birchfield examines this tendency to privilege images using photography, sculpture, drawing and text. Jerry Birchfield: Asleep in the Dust highlights the artist’s iterative process through which he creates works of art that blur boundaries between image, object, subject and meaning.

Birchfield applies layers of darkroom processes to achieve untraditional gelatin silver prints. Unlike most printed photographs, Birchfield’s are unique, as each sheet of paper retains traces of physical acts performed in the darkroom. Camera-based film negatives are enlarged onto light-sensitive paper that is partially obstructed by other materials (the technique used to make photograms). Chemicals then develop the latent image and further stretch contrast, tone and texture, sometimes introducing or erasing major compositional elements. In these highly constructed photographs, meaning emerges as much from the process of their production as from the recognizable imagery they contain.

Slivers of visible images reveal dusty, debris-laden surfaces that were in fact created to be photographed. Every aspect of Birchfield’s work emerges from the isolated space of his studio, where scraps, detritus and unfinished works often reappear in new iterations of ideas. In some cases, photographs become sculptures—by encasing prints in plaster, Birchfield masks their images and warps the paper. Viewers are confronted by the space that the photograph and the surrounding plaster occupy, which corresponds to the dimensions of a photograph in a standard frame.

Anchoring the exhibition, a raised platform in the center of the gallery references the importance of the act of framing for Birchfield. Its structure incorporates rectangular horizontal sections that are covered in glass, referencing common picture frames. Like amateur actors, sculptures that appear to mimic everyday objects are assembled on the stage. Some of these sculptures were created for past projects; others were made from fragments of cast-off materials—they have emerged from the dust of Birchfield’s studio.

—Elizabeth M. Carney, Assistant Curator, Akron Art Museum

Jerry Birchfield: Asleep in the Dust is organized by the Akron Art Museum with support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and the Ohio Arts Council.


Akron Art Museum

One South High Akron, OH 44308

330.376.9185

Open Wed-Sun 11-5, Thur 11-9


Nicholas Muellner: In Most Tides An Island

June 23 - September 2

2 Hylan Boulevard Staten Island, NY +

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Nicholas Muellner: In Most Tides An Island

June 23 - September 2


Alice Austen House Museum

2 Hylan Boulevard Staten Island, NY 10305

718.816.4506

Open Tues-Sun 11-5


Diane Arbus: Diane Arbus: A box of ten photographs

April 6, 2018 - January 27, 2019

Eighth & F St NW Washington, DC +

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Diane Arbus: Diane Arbus: A box of ten photographs

April 6, 2018 - January 27, 2019

In late 1969, Diane Arbus began to work on a portfolio. At the time of her death in 1971, she had completed the printing for eight known sets of A box of ten photographs, of a planned edition of fifty, only four of which she sold during her lifetime. Two were purchased by photographer Richard Avedon; another by artist Jasper Johns. A fourth was purchased by Bea Feitler, art director at Harper’s Bazaar, for whom Arbus added an eleventh photograph.

This exhibition traces the history of A box of ten photographs between 1969 and 1973, using the set that Arbus assembled for Feitler, which was acquired by the Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) in 1986. The story is a crucial one because it was the portfolio that established the foundation for Arbus’s posthumous career, ushering in photography’s acceptance to the realm of “serious” art. After his encounter with Arbus and the portfolio, Philip Leider, then editor in chief of Artforum and a photography skeptic, admitted, “With Diane Arbus, one could find oneself interested in photography or not, but one could no longer. . . deny its status as art. . . . What changed everything was the portfolio itself.”

In May 1971, Arbus was the first photographer to be featured in Artforum, which also showcased her work on its cover. In June 1972, the portfolio was sent to Venice, where Arbus was the first photographer included in a Biennale, at that time the premiere international showcase for contemporary artists. SAAM organized the American contribution to the Biennale that year, thereby playing an important early role in Arbus’s legacy.


Smithsonian American Art Museum

Eighth & F St NW Washington, DC 20004

202.633.1000

Open daily 11:30-7



Trevor Paglen: Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen

June 21, 2018 - January 6, 2019

Eighth & F St NW Washington, DC +

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Trevor Paglen: Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen

June 21, 2018 - January 6, 2019

Trevor Paglen blurs the lines between art, science, and investigative journalism to construct unfamiliar and at times unsettling ways to see and interpret the world around us. Inspired by the landscape tradition, he captures the same horizon seen by American photographers Timothy O’Sullivan in the nineteenth century and Ansel Adams in the twentieth. Only in Paglen’s photographs is the infrastructure of surveillance also apparent—a classified military installation, a spy satellite, a tapped communications cable, a drone, an artificial intelligence (AI).

Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen is a mid-career survey, the first exhibition to present Paglen’s early photographic series alongside his recent sculptural objects and new work with AI. It carries on the long history of programs by the Smithsonian American Art Museum examining America’s changing relationship to the landscape. With this presentation, SAAM is contributing to the important and ongoing conversation about privacy and surveillance in contemporary society.

Paglen’s photographs show something we are not meant to see, whose concealment he regards as symptomatic of the historical moment we inhabit. His objects act in opposition to what his images have exposed, imagining another and potentially different world. Paglen is a conceptual artist with activist intentions. Helping to better see the particular moment we live in and producing spaces in which to envision alternative futures are among his chief concerns.

Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen is organized by John Jacob, SAAM’s McEvoy Family Curator for Photography, and is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue.


Smithsonian American Art Museum

Eighth & F St NW Washington, DC 20004

202.633.1000

Open daily 11:30-7



Jan Staller: CYCLE and SAVED

February 24 - August 19

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX +

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Jan Staller: CYCLE and SAVED

February 24 - August 19

These two short videos by New York photographer-videographer Jan Staller reflect on a potent contradiction of contemporary material life. Where CYCLE revels in the powerful abstracting of paper traveling at high speed down a conveyer belt on its first step to being recycled, SAVED is a playful celebration of hundreds of small tools and toys accumulated over the years by the artist. Together these videos ask us to reflect on what we choose to keep and what we throw away.


Amon Carter Museum of American Art

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX 76107

817.738.1933

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Thur 10-8, Sun 12-5



Multitude, Solitude: The Photographs of Dave Heath

June 16 - September 16

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX +

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Multitude, Solitude: The Photographs of Dave Heath

June 16 - September 16

From a crowd gathered in Central Park to solitary figures lost in thought, Dave Heath’s powerful photographs of loss and hope conjure feelings of alienation and a desire for human connection. Multitude, Solitude highlights the photographer’s black-and-white pictures of the 1950s and 1960s, an intense period of self-discovery and innovation for the artist. During these pivotal years, Heath developed groundbreaking approaches to narrative and image sequence, producing exquisite individual prints; handmade book maquettes; his poetic masterwork, A Dialogue with Solitude; and multimedia slide presentations. His sensitive explorations of loss, pain, love and hope reveal Heath to be one of the most original photographers of those decades.

This exhibition is the first comprehensive survey of Heath’s deeply personal early work. Abandoned by both his parents by the age of 4, Heath lived in Philadelphia foster homes and in an orphanage until the age of 16. The turmoil of his childhood profoundly shaped Heath and his artistic vision. Just before his 16th birthday, he encountered a poignant photo-essay about foster care in Life magazine and became intrigued by photography’s potential to transcend simple reportage. Almost entirely self-taught, Heath channeled his feelings of abandonment into a body of work that underscores the importance and difficulties of human contact and interaction. Multitude, Solitude reaffirms Heath’s status as a key figure in twentieth-century photography and highlights his deeply empathetic sensibility.


Amon Carter Museum of American Art

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX 76107

817.738.1933

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Thur 10-8, Sun 12-5



00100011: The Treachery of Impermanence

June 5 - August 19

143 Ludlow St New York, NY +

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00100011: The Treachery of Impermanence

June 5 - August 19


Press Release

Anastasia Photo

143 Ludlow St New York, NY 10002

212.677.9725

kaley@anastasia-photo.com

Open Tues-Sun 11-7



Dabin Ahn: “2 + 3”

July 13 - August 25

300 W Superior St Chicago, IL +

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Dabin Ahn: “2 + 3”

July 13 - August 25


Andrew Bae Gallery

300 W Superior St Chicago, IL 60654

312.335.8601

info@andrewbaegallery.com

Open Tues-Sat 10-6


Not An Ostrich: And Other Images from America’s Library

April 21 - September 9

2000 Avenue of the Stars Los Angeles, CA +

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Not An Ostrich: And Other Images from America’s Library

April 21 - September 9

Not an Ostrich: And Other Images from America’s Library is the result of celebrated American photography curator Anne Wilkes Tucker’s excavation of nearly 500 images—out of a collection of over 14 million—permanently housed at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. While visitors to the exhibition might never see an ostrich, they will see the image entitled “Not an Ostrich” and a large selection of rare and handpicked works from the vaults of the world’s largest library, many never widely available to the public.

This exhibition spans across the history of photography—from daguerreotypes, the first photographic process, to contemporary digital prints. Iconic portraits of Abraham Lincoln, John Lennon and Yoko Ono, Cesar Chavez and Elizabeth Taylor appear alongside unusual images, such as, Stanley Kubrick’s “Strong Man’s Family” (1947), John Vachon’s “Ice Fishing, Minnesota” (1956), Susana Raab’s “Chicken in Love, Athens, OH” (2006) and Nina Berman’s “Flammable Faucet #4, Monroeton, PA” (2011). Vivid color portrayals of America, across time, are highlighted in juxtapositions of popular travel views from the late 19th century, created by the Detroit Publishing Company using the then-latest “photochrom” technology, on a screen next to striking contemporary scenes captured by Carol M. Highsmith.

A nation’s story is a reflection of its collective—and selective—memory. Not an Ostrich: And Other Images from America’s Library invites visitors to experience our shared heritage.


Press Release

Annenberg Space For Photography

2000 Avenue of the Stars Los Angeles, CA 90067

213.403.3000

info@annenbergspaceforphotography.org

Open Wed-Sun 11-6