Stay tuned message graphic

March – April 2020 In Profile

  Community is important to the success of any artistic venture, but what about the people who sustain it? Front Room Gallery was something of an upstart in Williamsburg’s burgeoning gallery scene when its founder, Daniel Aycock, opened its doors on Roebling Street in 1999. He was committed to showing new photographers as well as ambitious projects in diverse media. Today, long after many of those galleries have closed, Front Room is thriving. Aycock credits the gallery’s co-director (and his wife), Kathleen Vance, for shepherding the venture into its 20th year. They began working together in 2004 and married in 2010. “Kathleen knew how to navigate the business aspects of the art world in ways that I never really got,” says Aycock. “I always tried…

READ MORE

January – February 2020 In Profile

  Mediums have always been slotted into hierarchies and categories in the history of art. Drawing always took a back seat to painting; and photography, a back seat to both. But thanks to dealers like Kim Bourus – a champion of under-served artists whose practices draw from multiple mediums – those categorizations are becoming increasingly blurred. When she opened her gallery, Higher Pictures, on Madison Avenue in 2007, she set out to show the kind of photography that acknowledged the inherently adaptive, resilient – what she calls “plastic” – qualities of the medium, challenging societal, conceptual, and commercial norms along the way. This fall, Bourus showed Iterations (III), Jessica Eaton’s color-rich and labor-intensive images (homages to Josef Albers’s abstract color studies). Through February 8, Bourus is…

READ MORE

November – December 2019 In Profile

When some people decide to open their first art gallery, they check out the landscape – see what is already out there, what works. But the really successful people look for a gap: a place in the artistic terrain that isn’t there, but ought to be. And they make it their calling to fill it with something new, something that will stand out. Certainly the works at M+B in Los Angeles are diverse – outdoor sculpture, site-specific installation, narrative painting, abstract painting, and the gallery’s mainstay, a roster of photography that ranges from unorthodox documentary work (Hugh Holland’s skate-culture works from the ‘70s) to the highly conceptual (Ellen Carey’s color-rich abstract photograms). What they all have in common is M+B owner Benjamin Trigano’s keen eye…

READ MORE

September – October 2019 In Profile

Howard Yezerski can attest that he has taken more than one leap of faith during his 51 years as a dealer of contemporary fine art and photography. Back in 1968, when he opened his first gallery in Andover, MA, he was newly married, fresh out of the army – and had zero experience selling art. A friend from college suggested opening a gallery together, and 20 years later, the gallery moved to Boston on a shoestring. “I mortgaged our property and rolled the dice. I wanted to make my learning curve as steep as possible,” says Yezerski, “and I soon realized that there was a big difference between a gallery in the suburbs and one in the big city.”  Today, the gallery is in its…

READ MORE

July – August 2019 In Profile

  Sometimes, to succeed in life, you have to be willing to upend your expectations. Take Monique Deschaines, owner of Euqinom Gallery, for instance. The energetic dealer of contemporary photography left a solid 10-year career as a graphic designer in her native Boston to come out west and go to graduate school. It wasn’t supposed to be a permanent move, but by 2015, in a volatile market, she took the plunge into dealing contemporary photography and, Euqinom, now celebrating its first year with a permanent space in the Mission District, is thriving.  The indefatigable dealer credits her sense of humor and her unique perspective. “People can work with me for a while before they figure out that ‘Euqinom’ is my first name, backwards,” says Deschaines. “They…

READ MORE

May – June 2019 In Profile

Good friends are often brought together by a shared past, but what’s cemented a lasting friendship between Michi Jigarjian and Libby Pratt is their shared vision for photography’s future. The duo runs Baxter Street at the Camera Club of New York, Pratt as director, and Jigarjian as president of the board, and the two work inseparably. The mission of the esteemed nonprofit, founded in 1884, has always been to serve the needs of photographers, and Jigarjian and Pratt have made it their goal to honor that mission, even as they shepherd it into the 21st century. “Lens-based artists may be working with photography,” says Pratt, “but they don’t want to be restricted to just hanging pictures on the wall. We see ourselves as the kind…

READ MORE

March – April 2019 In Profile

  Sarah Schmerler speaks to the director of Galerie XII’s Los Angeles venue, Douglas Marshall, about growing up in Texas, working in Austin, and making the move to LA, where he organized some 50 shows and art fair for the Fetterman Gallery before taking on his role at Galerie XII. “I’m that person who connects the dots, who makes an idea come to life,” he says.

READ MORE

January – February 2019 In Profile

Change is the only constant in life, and the best thing to do is embrace it. Brent Beamon has done just that. During the 14 years he has been with Flowers Gallery, he has seen its stable shift from emerging and underexposed British artists working largely in painting and sculpture to an international roster that is more than a third comprised of photographic arts. Beamon, the director of Flowers’s New York venue, is enthusiastic about the gallery’s photographic expansion. “We show the kind of artists who don’t want to be categorized with other artists whose work looks just like theirs,” he says. “Our painters and photographers are so different, but you can also say that they are alike in their social concerns, their cultural issues….

READ MORE

November – December 2018 In Profile

  From the moment Robert Koch printed his first photogram in summer camp at eight years old, he knew he had found his calling. It was a calling he followed as, years later, he kicked around the wharves of New York City with Photo Leaguers like Lou Bernstein and trawled for deals in Willoughby’s Camera shop. In 1968 he arrived on the West Coast, in time for massive anti-war protests much in tune with his own political activism, and he made his first photography purchase in 1970 – 2,000 small Edward Curtis gravures. “I traded a Navajo blanket for them,” he says. “I had been collecting ethnographic art. The gravures were $3 a piece, and I figured I couldn’t go wrong.” We could go on…

READ MORE