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René Burri, 1933-2014


René Burri, photo by Sandro Campardo / European Press Photo Agency

Magnum photographer René Burri died on October 20 at the age of 81. Among the best-known images taken by the globe-trotting photographer is the iconic and widely reproduced image of Che Guevara, head tilted back and smoking a cigar. Burri also photographed Pablo Picasso, Alberto Giacometti, as well as the conflicts in Vietman, Cyprus, and Korea. His work was included in many exhibitions and he published a number of books, including, most recently, Impossible Reminiscences (2013), a collection of his color work.

— By Jean Dykstra  10/23/2014

Joseph Sywenkyj Wins Eugene Smith Grant


Joseph Sywenkyj, from Verses from a Nation in Transition

Joseph Sywenkyj has been awarded the $30,000 W. Eugene Smith Grant for humanistic photography for 2014. He won for his project Verses from a Nation in Transition, about the ways families in Ukraine have been affected by the crisis in their country. A native of Ukraine who is a U.S. citizen, Sywenkyj has spent more than a decade traveling between Ukraine and New Hampshire  to document his home country.

Also recognized were Moira Saman, who received a $5,000 fellowship for her project Discordia: The Arab Spring, and Murial Hasbun, who was awarded the Howard Chapnick Grant for laberinto project, documenting the history of artists working in Central American after the Salvadoran war.

 

— By Jean Dykstra  10/16/2014

United States Artist Fellowships Announced


LaToya Ruby Frazier, ©Aubrey J. Kauffman

LaToya Ruby Frazier and Leslie Hewitt were among the 34 artists who received United States Artists fellowships for 2014, each of whom will receive $50,000 of unrestricted financial support. Frazier’s first book, The Notion of Family, was released this year by Aperture, and she is the recipient of a 2014 Guggenheim Fellowship. Frazier will speaking with Dawoud Bey tonight at 6:30 pm Aperture.

Hewitt works with photography, sculpture, and site-specific installations and shows at Sikkema Jenkins.

Founded in 2006 by the Ford, Rockefeller, Rasmuson, and Prudential foundations, the grants are currently funded by a broad range of philanthropic organizations and individuals.  

— By Jean Dykstra  10/15/2014

Ray Metzker, 1931-2014


The Estate of Ray K. Metzker, courtesy Laurence Miller Gallery

Photographer Ray Metzker died October 9, at the age of 83. Metzker was born in Milwaukee and attended Chicago’s Institute of Design, studying with Harry Callahan and Aaron Siskind, among others. He eventually settled in the Philadelphia area and set about making ambitious and graphic black-and-white photographs of street scenes and pedestrians, often using multiple exposures and serial imagery.

Metzker was given his first solo show at the Museum of Modern Art in 1967 and had a retrospective at the International Center of Photography in 1978. An exhibition of his work is on view at the Laurence Miller Gallery through October 25.

— By Jean Dykstra  10/14/2014

Lois Conner: The Long View

Gitterman Gallery, New York


Lois Conner, Bronx Botanical Garden, New York, 1990. ©Lois Conner, courtesy Gitterman Gallery

Landscape photographer Lois Conner is known for the elegant platinum prints she’s made over three decades of photographing in China, which she first visited in 1984 on a Guggenheim Fellowship. (Her book, Beijing: Contemporary and Imperial, was published this year by Princeton Architectural Press.) The works on view at Gitterman Gallery through November 15, however, are evidence of a consistency of vision no matter where Conner sets up camp, whether it is the Badlands in South Dakota, a Louisiana swamp, urban rooftops, or pondside, where she’s photographed lily pads floating on the still, velvety surface of the water. 

Because the works on view are all platinum prints in greys and inky blacks, and because they were all made with a banquet camera, which elongates the images (they are either 7 by 17 inches or 17 by 7), they tend to have the formal, reserved qualities of Chinese scroll paintings, even if the subject is a twisted tree in the Bronx Botanical Garden.  The shared qualities of these exquisite prints – the nearly cloudless grey skies standing in for blank canvases, the unpeopled scenes, the deep shadows and highly detailed texture of each image – can make it difficult to focus on the distinctive characteristics of each place. 

Lois Conner, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 1988. ©Lois Conner, courtesy Gitterman Gallery

Perhaps for this reason, it was the more unexpected, less conventionally scenic views that stood out for me: Baton Rouge, Louisiana, from 1988, a fog-enshrouded view of sight lines converging, with an oncoming train on curved tracks, the latticework of a low bridge in the distance, and a pickup truck listing on the embankment. Port Allen, Louisiana, 1988, gives a timeless quality to a scrap-filled yard dotted with a couple of chickens and an empty clothesline. And the dark, lonesome view of a long-abandoned canoe in a wooded grove, also in Louisiana, could be a 19th-century landscape painting, laden with symbolism.

 

 

— By Jean Dykstra  10/10/2014

Howard Greenberg / Steidl


The Howard Greenberg Gallery and Steidl publishers have teamed up to develop the Steidl/Howard Greenberg Library, a new imprint. The books will be conceptualized by Greenberg, who will be working with editor Bob Shamis and designer Gregory Wakabayshi. Upcoming books include monographs on Sid Grossman, Dan Weiner, Lewis Hine, and a two-volume project on Ruth Orkin and Morris Engel, who were married. 

This year the imprint has published three books, one on Saul Leiter, one on James Karales, and one on Leon Levinstein.  

 

— By Jean Dykstra  10/09/2014

Magic on Earth: Jean-Claude Moschetti

M.I.A. Gallery, Seattle


Jean-Claude Moschetti, Ouri #2, 2010. Courtesy M.I.A. Gallery

Ancient secret societies of West Africa are normally hidden from outsiders. Yet here they are, costumed head to toe and dancing in broad daylight in photographs on view at Seattle's M.I.A. Gallery through October 25. In Pouni #1 (2010, from the series “Volta Noire,” taken in Burkina Faso), three figures--two wearing snake masks whose erect bodies double the height of their wearers--in shaggy pink raffia costumes crouch near a hamlet of mud buildings. The French photographer Jean-Claude Moschetti, who has photographed in Sierra Leone, Benin, and Burkina Faso, gained access to these secret animistic cults because he himself is an initiate, having been drawn to the belief system of the Egungun while working as a press photographer in Benin.  

Jean-Claude Moschetti, Pouni #1, 2010. Courtesy M.I.A. Gallery

This ongoing series of works, begun in 2008 – seven of which fill the walls of this trim storefront gallery—stand as visual equivalents of the mindset of a people for whom a connection with the dead (their ancestors) is a regular part of life. Performing in transformative costumes of animal deities aides the transition between the supernatural and material world. Moschetti effectively translates these metaphysics into a spatial construction by fusing together skewed, similar, or altogether different views of the same scene in medium to large-sized diptychs and triptychs. The staging of one, two or at most three costumed figures isolated in purposely deserted locales adds to the surrealism of these images. 

 

— By Melissa Feldman  10/09/2014

Blind Spot | Griffin Editions Project Space


Blind Spot and Griffin Editions have launched a new Project Space in the Gowanus neighborhood of Brooklyn for exhibitions and events. Blind Spot 20th Anniversary editions are on view in the space through December 1, and a reception will be held October 18 from 2 to 4 pm.  The Griffin Editions | Blind Spot Projects Space will also be participating in the Gowanus Open Studio weekend, October 17-19. 

 

— By Jean Dykstra  10/08/2014

Shannon Ebner: Public Surface Pattern

Altman Siegel Gallery, San Francisco


Shannon Ebner, Traffic Control Device, 2014. Courtesy the artist and Altman Siegel

Two large photographs in Shannon Ebner’s deceptively formal exhibition at Altman Siegel through November 1 depict illuminated road signs. It’s a familiar mechanism, which is usually parked on the side of the road—a matrix of bulbs that spell out phrases such as “Expect Delays,” which is the text in Ebner’s Portable Changeable Message Sign One Delays, 2014. Here, however, while the warning is the same, the form is visually tweaked, and fixed in a moment. The text is seen in negative, the words formed by black dots, which communicate a starker, more embodied emphasis than in its usual illuminated form. In the title, Ebner refers to the machine itself, and its portable, changeable condition. These signs are also termed “variable-message” a perfectly apt way to describe Ebner’s sly, slow burn aesthetic.

In previous work, often flatly lit studio shots, she’s constructed alphabet-like forms with bulky cinderblocks and what appears to be pegboard, inserting components of language into semi-orderly grids. These are punctuated with desolate landscapes and shots of graffiti. 

Shannon Ebner, Portable Changeable Message Sign One Delays, 2014. Courtesy the artist and Altman Siegel

In this show, as before, the tone of the mostly black-and-white images is cool, yet the meanings and spirit purposefully waver: The six well-deployed works, all 2014, seem earnest and mischievous, flat and three-dimensional, vintage and contemporary. Rather than being constructed, all depict language and messaging, or the appearance thereof, as directly found in transit zones. The letterforms are deceptive in scale, due to the distorting abilities of photography.  The Portable Changeable sign pieces in her current show, for example, are life size, but they seem strangely diminished as outdoor signs, yet outsized as framed art inside the gallery. 

A greater transformation occurs with Public Surface Pattern, a tall, thin vertical piece that resembles a totem of alphabet blocks, though closer inspection reveals a panoramic, New Topographics-like shot rotated 90-degrees. It depicts an overpass construction zone, and the marks are formed from fabric stretched over a chain link fence, the slashes made to accommodate wind forming an accidental cuneiform. This work, along with the geometric shapes on the chain link matrix in the handsome Service Club Signs Verso, bring to mind John Baldessari’s genial conceptualism. While Ebner’s work is more tonally earnest, her flips, reverses, and shifts transport the gravity of message-bearing objects into surprisingly buoyant territory. 

 

— By Glen Helfand  10/07/2014

Ruud van Empel: New Work

Jackson Fine Art, Atlanta


Ruud van Empel, Nude #2, 2014. Courtesy Jackson Fine Art, ©Ruud Van Empel

Photoshop trickery is so commonly used to improve bodies and faces, alter settings, or create convincing composites, that most of us take it for granted. Dutch artist Ruud van Empel intentionally goes overboard in manipulated works that are too eerily perfect or just subtly off. 

Van Empel assembles his figures and scenes from bits and pieces of disparate images—dressed mannequins, faces, body parts, flowers. Colors are pumped up and settings digitally staged to create these surreal but believable fictions.

A number of new works in his current show at Jackson Fine Art, through November 29, are a continuation of his earlier series involving children, who all have blank expressions and flawless ebony or ivory skin. A nude black girl stands sideways amid an allover field of yellow flowers; the sparkling blue eyes of a blonde Dresden-dollish girl float in a sea of milky white skin. 

It's not clear whether van Empel is commenting on artificiality and physical ideals, or simply showing off his technical prowess. He doesn’t offer answers, only luscious, saturated color, and studies in contrast, monochrome, or pattern. 

Ruud van Empel, Still Life Meat, 2014. Courtesy Jackson Fine Art, ©Ruud van Empel

The most compelling work in the show has all these same qualities, yet looks nothing like the others. Both figurative and abstract, it is a still life from 2014 of a smorgasbord of raw, freshly butchered meat. A bisected pig’s head sits front and center, its cranial contents laid bare. The head faces back, as if the animal were surveying its deconstructed self. A popped-out eyeball has rolled off to the side and seems to stare at the viewer—j’accuse. Arranged behind it are piles of carved cuts and a slab of aged beef. Squishy-looking innards are dropped here and draped there. The pattern of marbled flesh continues in the marble table and backsplash. From a distance, the image looks painterly, with fat and blood glistening and striated muscle suggesting brushstrokes.  

The work’s fleshy hues are echoed in two images, also from 2014, a nude women posed against peachy pink backgrounds. Their slender bodies are youthful but their heads clearly belong to other, likely older, women. Like a Mannerist painting, the proportions and perspective are a little off. Instead of enhancing their attributes, Van Empel has made these women exceedingly ordinary. Ultimately, all of van Empel’s works are still lifes, his subjects and models to be arranged and depicted according to his whims. 

 

— By Stephanie Cash  10/03/2014

Getty Acquires Chris Killip Photographs


Chris Killip, Bever, Skinningrove, North Yorkshire, 1980. Courtesy the J. Paul Getty Museum, ©Chris Killip

The J. Paul Getty Museum has acquired 49 photographs by Chris Killip, the influential postwar documentary photographer.  The museum now owns the complete set of 50 images in Killip’s 1988 book In Flagrante, giving it the most significant group of Killip prints in an American institution. Killip photographed in Northern England between 1973 and 1985, during that region’s serious economic downturn. His subjects included miners, working-class people, council estates, and parades and benefits organized to benefit the striking miners in 1984. Born and raised on the Isle of Man, Killip has spent his career photographing the people of Great Britain. On Sunday, October 18, Killip will speak about his work at the Getty Center at 4:30 pm.

— By Jean Dykstra  10/02/2014

Samuel Fosso

Walther Collection Project Space, New York


Samuel Fosso, Self-portrait (from Self-portraits from the '70s), 1976. Courtesy The Walther Collection and Jean-Marc Patras Galerie

This past February, looters in Bangui, in the Central African Republic, destroyed the photography studio of Samuel Fosso, dumping negatives and prints into the street. Associated Press photographer Jerome Delay and photojournalist Marcus Bleasdale happened to notice the work scattered in the road and rescued as much of it as they could. The exhibition of Fosso’s photographs at the Walther Collection through January 17 underscores what a loss it would be if that work had been destroyed. Fosso, who was born in Cameroon, opened a photography studio in Bangui when he was all of 13-years-old. More than a dozen small vintage studio portraits are on view in the Walther Collection’s library, mounted on cardboard and displayed on bookshelves. From a photograph of a couple embracing to one of two small, smartly dressed children gazing solemnly at the camera  to a young man striking a kung fu pose, they suggest a trusted photographer who enabled his subjects to perform their ideal selves for the camera. The photographs are stylish and playfully empowering.

Samuel Fosso, Le chef qui a vendu l'Afrique aux colons, 1997. Courtesy The Walther Collection and Jean Marc Patras Galerie

Those same elements inform Fosso’s self-portraits, which invite comparisons with studio photographers Seydou Keita and Malick Sidibé, but also with the performative self-portraits of Yasumasa Morimura, Cindy Sherman, or the Nigerian-born Ike Ude. Fosso’s black-and-white self-portraits from the 1970s show him adopting various incarnations of cool, wearing bell bottoms, a Kodak cap, and sunglasses, or, in an image that looks ahead to his African Spirits series from the late 2000s, wearing a t-shirt with the faces of Barthélemy Boganda, the first prime minister of the Central African Republic, and Jean-Bédel Bokassa, military ruler of CAR, slyly introducing iconic imagery of political figures into his work. In African Spirits (2008), Fosso recreates well-known images of Malcolm X, Angela Davis, Muhammad Ali, Kwame Nkrumah, the first president of Ghana, and others, reflecting on style versus substance and the way such images shape the public imagination. 

Similar themes underscore the vibrant color photographs commissioned by the Paris department store Magasins Tati in 1997. The sharp political commentary (about class, race, and colonialism) is couched in opulent imagery. In one, he embodies a natty golfer surrounded by plastic potted plants – smartly dressed but full of fakery -- in another (titled Le chef qui a vendu l’Afrique aux colons), a bejeweled, self-satisfied chief in animal skins and white plastic sunglasses. The backdrop is hung with African textiles, which feature a repeating motif of hand-held mirrors, suggesting the chief look hard at himself.

 

— By Jean Dykstra  10/01/2014

Yvonne Venegas: San Pedro Garza Garcia

Shoshana Wayne Gallery, Santa Monica


Yvonne Venegas, Zally, 2013. Courtesy Shoshana Wayne Gallery

After finishing school, the Mexico City-based photographer Yvonne Venegas worked for a few years for fashion photographers in New York, assisting Jüergen Teller and Dana Lixenberg, two photographers known for walking the line between glamour and grit. Without reading too much into those years, it’s worth noting the respect she gives to her subjects’ beauty, and their desire to be beautiful. She frames her subjects in ways that make them immensely pleasing to look at, even when her images have complicated undertones. In the early 2000s, for instance, she photographed the wealthy matriarch Maria Elvia Hank, looking glamorous and composed, placing Christmas candles on a Reindeer-shaped candelabrum. But a servant bends down behind Mrs. Hank, picking up a candle she has dropped, revealing the infrastructure supporting the smooth presentation.

Venegas’s current exhibition, on view through October 25 at Shoshana Wayne Gallery, is called San Pedro Garza Garcia, after the community it depicts. A suburb of Monterrey in the Mexican state of Nuevo León, San Pedro Garza García has a population of about 150,000 and the highest per capita income of any Latin American municipality. This attracted Venegas to it, as did the city’s singular ability to ward off the effects of the drug war that has ravaged so many other Mexican communities. 

Yvonne Venegas, Rosina and Models, 2013. Courtesy Shoshana Wayne Gallery

Her photographs don’t allude explicitly to this socioeconomic context. Instead, they portray in between moments in an attractive world that appears relatively self-contained. A group of seven models, all brunette and all in white shirts and jeans, look at fashion magazines underneath a chandelier.  Three of them level gazes at the camera. A bride, alone underneath a romantic painting of cupid and a candelabrum, adjusts her dress. Two adolescent girls, lanky and maybe bored, sit on a wrap-around beige couch in a living room that’s impressively clutter-free. It’s pristine but languid: The Truman Show meets The Ice Storm. Even her cityscapes, which suggest the existence of a bigger, rougher world, are suspiciously calm. 

Venegas’s subjects are mostly unattainable anomalies but her portrayal of relatable moments behind the scenes blurs the abnormality into normality and makes her work compelling. Her images invite you to try to pick apart the roles people are playing, especially in San Pedro Garcia, where it’s clear class and hierarchy matter, but it’s never clear who has what power in the various moments she’s portrayed. 

 

— By Catherine Wagley  09/29/2014

Guarapuava: Valdir Cruz

Throckmorton Fine Art, New York


Valdir Cruz, Gypsy Woman I / Mulher cigana I, Guarapuava series, 1991. Courtesy Throckmorton Fine Art

For Valdir Cruz, Guarapuava will always be home. It is the place where he learned to hunt with a slingshot and fish with his hands. It is where he recognizes the songs of the birds and knows the names of the rivers and trees. It is where he sold oranges on the streets and snuck into movies and fell in love for the first time.

Even after Cruz left the Brazilian countryside, at the age of 23, for the United States, Guarapuava remained a photographic base of sorts, a place where he could return again and again with his camera to flex his photographic muscle. Over the last 30 years, he's brought with him the knowing eye of a native son along with the political and social scrutiny of an anthropologist. 

His exhibition at Throckmorton Fine Art through November 1 feels at once intimate and sweeping, personal yet documentary in style. As Cruz's lens traverses the rural landscape of his past, faces seem to peer out of a family album -- albeit a diverse one, made up of indigenous peoples, cattle drivers, potato pickers, Gypsies, and African and German immigrants. They are by turns joyful, somber, and proud. In one, the gaze of an anonymous Gypsy woman pierces the camera, her expression a mystery.

Valdir Cruz, Pinus Araucaria, Guarapuava series, 1991. Courtesy Throckmorton Fine Art

Amongst these portraits, in a sign of the peoples' strong connection to their environment, hang photos of Guarapuava's natural beauty. A lone white horse grazes along the still Jordāo River; water, made silky and smooth through long exposure, glides over dark cliffs; a small wooden chapel at the back of a farm peeks through the morning fog.

Cruz's black-and-white photos speak not just of life, but of destruction. The body of water, for instance, in Cruz's photo, Landscape with Trees and Lake, is artificial, created by an electrical dam. The view, Cruz said in an interview, "used to be beautiful." A portrait of an indigenous Guarani man, meanwhile, contains the history of a people whose population has been decimated through the years by colonialism and slavery. The traditional cattle driving Cruz depicts, likewise, is increasingly rare, replaced mostly by trucking.

"Photography is a vision; the rest is technique," Cruz's recounts his friend George Stone telling him in the afterward to his book, Guarapuava. Indeed, while Cruz's technique has improved over the course of 30 years as he evolved from a novice to a master, his vision is consistent, telling a story of timeless grace amid change and ruination. 

 

 

— By Jordan G. Teicher  09/28/2014

ICP to Bowery


Part of the ICP's collection of more than 150,000 images: David Scherman, Robert Capa, Weymouth, England, 1944. ©David Scherman

The International Center of Photography has decided to relocate to a building on the Bowery, near the New Museum, when the lease expires on its Midtown building next year, according to the New York Times.  The center’s board approved a plan to buy the building near the New Museum last week, according to the Times, and the aim is the have the building ready by mid-2015.

“This location provides a real frontage so that we can have a direct dialogue with the street, and that’s key to our mission going forward,” Mark Lubell, the center’s executive director, told the Times. Regarding the neighborhood, he said: “There’s openness to experimentation and ideas in that part of town. Chelsea is a wonderful place, but it’s already done and established. We’d be following, and I don’t want to follow.”

In addition, in January 2015, the ICP will open a 15,000-square-foot collections facility and media lab at Mana Contemporary in Jersey City. The space will house the ICP’s collection of more than 150,000 works by Cornell Capa, Robert Capa, Weegee, Chim, and Gerda Taro. Mana Contemporary is home to the Richard Meier Model Museum, Gary Lichtenstein Editions silkscreen studio, the Eileen S. Kaminsky Family Foundation, the Middle East Center for the Arts, Shen Wei Dance Arts, the Keating Foundry, and more.

— By Jean Dykstra  09/27/2014

archives

2014
December
November
October
René Burri, 1933-2014


Joseph Sywenkyj Wins Eugene Smith Grant


United States Artist Fellowships Announced


Ray Metzker, 1931-2014


Lois Conner: The Long View

at Gitterman Gallery, New York


Howard Greenberg / Steidl


Magic on Earth: Jean-Claude Moschetti

at M.I.A. Gallery, Seattle


Blind Spot | Griffin Editions Project Space


Shannon Ebner: Public Surface Pattern

at Altman Siegel Gallery, San Francisco


Ruud van Empel: New Work

at Jackson Fine Art, Atlanta


Getty Acquires Chris Killip Photographs


Samuel Fosso

at Walther Collection Project Space, New York


September
Yvonne Venegas: San Pedro Garza Garcia

at Shoshana Wayne Gallery, Santa Monica


Guarapuava: Valdir Cruz

at Throckmorton Fine Art, New York


ICP to Bowery


Whitney Museum Gets Major Photography Gift


Amon Carter Museum Digitizes Trove of Artworks


Climate Week NYC at ICP


Filter Photo Festival


Richard Mosse at Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art


Ernest Cole: Photographer

at Grey Art Gallery, New York


August Sander: Just Women / Jess T. Dugan: Every Breath We Drew

at Gallery Kayafas, Boston


August
Photo Shanghai Debuts


Kasher|Potamkin Launches New Gallery/Boutique


July
Wynn Bullock: Revelations

at High Museum of Art, Atlanta


Where There's Smoke. John Gossage: Who Do You Love

at Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco


Allan Sekula: Ship of Fools

at Christopher Grimes Gallery, Santa Monica


Cantor Art Center Receives Warhol Archive


Jack Leigh: Full Circle, Low Country Photographs, 1972-2004

at SCAD Museum of Art, Savannah


Josef Koudelka: Nationality Doubtful

at Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago


Stephen Wirtz Gallery Closing


Justin Kimball: Where We Find Ourselves

at Carroll And Sons, Boston


Jacques Sonck: Archetypes

at L. Parker Stephenson Photographs, New York


The Invisible Photograph


Getty Acquires Robert McElroy Archive


Oresick Joins Silver Eye Center


Liz Deschenes Awarded Rappaport Prize


New Avedon App


Bonjour Arles!


Doug Hall: Bodies in Space

at Benrubi Gallery, New York


Cahiers d'Art Devoted to Sugimoto


Photo Espana Prize Goes to Aitor Lara


June
Anthony Friedkin: The Gay Essay

at de Young Museum, San Francisco


2014 Prix HSBC Awarded to Two Photographers


Rudolf Kicken, 1947-2014


"Biggest Photography Class in History"


Puppies and Pictures


Domesticated: Photographs by Amy Stein

at National Academy of Sciences, Washington


Steel Stillman: Incidents, 1969-2014

at Show Room Gowanus, Brooklyn


Callahan Collection Donated to Vancouver Art Gallery


Brandon Thibodeaux Wins Michael P. Smith Grant


Roger Mayne, 1929-2014


The Fence Goes on View in Brooklyn


Ka-Man Tse Wins Robert Giard Fellowship


Multiple Exposures: Jewelry and Photography / The Embroidered Image

at Museum of Arts and Design / Robert Mann Gallery, New York


Tim Barber: Relations

at Capricious 88, New York


May
Michael Flomen: Wild Nights

at Boite Noire Gallery, West Hollywood


Sze Tsung Leong: Horizons

at Yossi Milo Gallery, New York


Portland Art Museum Acquires Robert Adams Photographs


Michael Schmidt, 1945-2014


Paul Anthony Smith: Mangos and Crab

at Carrie Secrist Gallery, Chicago


Michael Schmidt Wins Prix Pictet


Jaimie Warren

at SF Camerawork, San Francisco


Symposium at Getty Celebrates 175th Anniversary of Photography


Zoe Leonard Receives Buckbaum Award


Andre Serrano Creates Public Art Project


Luigi Ghirri: La Città

at Matthew Marks Gallery (LA), Los Angeles


Richard Mosse Wins Deutsche Börse Prize


Poetics of Light: Pinhole Photography

at New Mexico History Museum, Santa Fe


Prix Pictet Finalists On View at V&A


Richard Renaldi: Touching Strangers / This Grand Show

at Aperture Gallery / Bonni Benrubi Gallery, New York


Hillman Photography Initiative Explores Future of Photography


Walking in Their Shoes


Mark Ruwedel Wins Scotiabank Photography Award


April
Gabor Kerekes, 1945-2014


Major Gifts to High Museum


Hiroshi Sugimoto Wins Isamu Noguchi Prize


Carolle Bénitah: Photos-Souvenirs

at Sous Les Etoiles Gallery, New York


A New Space for Photo-Eye


Maroesjka Lavigne: Island

at Robert Mann Gallery, New York


George Dureau, 1931-2014


More AIPAD Picks from Elisabeth Biondi


Elisabeth Biondi's AIPAD Picks


Sarah Schmerler's Picks from AIPAD


2014 Guggenheim Fellowships


Lisa Sette Relocating


Photo Eye: Avant-Garde Photography in Europe

at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston


Lower East Side Photo Walk


Roe Ethridge: Sacrifice Your Body

at Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York


March
Laurie Simmons: Kigurumi, Dollers and How We See

at Salon 94 Bowery, New York


Getty Museum Acquires Tress Photographs


Amy Elkins Wins Aperture Portfolio Prize


Moutoussamy-Ashe Photos Go to Smithsonian


Walead Beshty: Selected Bodies of Work

at Regen Projects, Los Angeles


Public Intimacy: Art and Other Ordinary Acts in South Africa

at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco


Prince/Cariou Case Settled


Daniel Gordon Wins Paul Huf Award


New Photo Gallery in Williamsburg


ICP on the Move


National Gallery of Art Receives Gift of Photographs


Jamie Warren Wins Baum Award


Chloe Dewe Mathews Wins Gardner Fellowship


Matthew Pillsbury: Nate and Me

at Sasha Wolf Gallery, New York


Getty Images Opens Up Library


Paula McCartney: A Field Guide to Snow and Ice

at Klompching Gallery, Brooklyn


American Cool

at National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C.


February
Steichen/Warhol: Picturing Fame

at Block Museum of Art, Evanston


ICP Announces Infinity Award Winners


Onward in Philly


Samuel Fosso Photographs Rescued


J. Shimon & J. Lindemann: We Go From Where We Know

at John Michael Kohler Art Center, Sheboygan


John Stanmeyer Wins World Press Photo Award


Not Your Grandmother's Librarian


Patrick Nagatani: Outer and Inner: Contemplations on the Physical and the Spiritual

at Andrew Smith Gallery (annex), Santa Fe


New Photo Gallery in Boston


Fred McDarrah: Save the Village

at Steven Kasher Gallery, New York


J.D. 'Okhai Ojeikere, 1930-2014


Kevin Cooley and Phillip Andrew Lewis: Unexplored Territory

at Kopeikin Gallery, Los Angeles


January
Public Art Project Highlights the Boroughs


Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video

at Guggenheim Museum, New York


Getty Acquires Pictorialist Photographs


Peter Hujar: Love & Lust

at Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco


Child Identified in 1908 Lewis Hine Photo


Heather Snider Joins SF Camerawork


The Sochi Project: An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus

at DePaul Art Museum, Chicago


Phillip Prodger Joins London's National Portrait Gallery


Tanya Marcuse: Fallen

at Julie Saul Gallery, New York


Joshua Chuang Joins CCP


Sophie Calle: Last Seen

at Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston


Danielle Durchslag: Relative Unknowns

at Denny Gallery, New York


Carnegie Museum Founds Hillman Photography Initiative


Soo Kim Awarded Gutmann Fellowship


Symposium on March on Washington


2013
December
November
Balthus: The Last Studies

at Gagosian Gallery (Mad Ave), New York


Saul Leiter, 1923-2013


Maine Philanthropists Give Collection to Portland Museum of Art


Daniel Morel Wins Suit Against Getty Images/AFP


Sean McFarland: Glass Mountains

at Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco


John Divola: As Far As I Could get

at Santa Barbara Museum of Art, LACMA, Pomona Museum of Art,


Eileen Quinlan: Curtains

at Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York


ICP Names New Executive Director


Clarence John Laughlin Award Announced


Prix Pictet Shortlist Announced


And the Winner Is ....


Libération's Powerful Homage to Photography


Tanja Hollander: The Landscapes of Are You Really My Friend?

at Carroll And Sons, Boston


War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and its Aftermath

at Brooklyn Museum of Art, Brooklyn


Lisa Hostetler to Eastman House


Dispatched to Texas


Finding Vivian Maier


Queens Museum Reopens with Photos by Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao


New E-Book from Library of Congress


Hello, Goodbye


October
Iké Udé: Style and Sympathies

at Leila Heller Gallery, New York


Deborah Turbeville, 1932-2013


ICP Celebrates Robert Capa's Centenary


Of Walking

at Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago


Here is New York


Polly Borland: You

at PK Shop, New York


Exhibition Showcases Martin Weinstein's Collection


They Are Us: Animal Identity and the Anthropomorphic Urge

at Rick Wester Fine Art, New York


Roxana Marcoci Named Senior Curator at MoMA


Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Acquires Manfred Heiting Photo Book Collection


Documerica Looks Back


Matthew Porter: Greet the Dust

at M+B Gallery, Los Angeles


George Tice: 60 Years of Photography

at Nailya Alexander Gallery, New York


September
Sebastiaan Bremer

at Edwynn Houk Gallery, New York


Carrie Mae Weems Is a MacArthur Genius


We Shall: Photographs by Paul D'Amato

at DePaul Art Museum, Chicago


She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World

at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston


Malcolm Daniel Heading to Texas


Ryan McGinley: Yearbook

at Ratio 3, San Francisco


Brian Sholis Joins Cincinnati Art Museum


Pieter Hugo: Kin

at Yossi Milo Gallery, New York


Adieu to Le Journal de la Photographie


Nadia Sablin Wins Firecracker Photography Award


Getty Acquires Baltz Archive


August
Ray Metzker: Shadow Catcher

at Andrew Smith Gallery, Santa Fe


Guillermo Santos: La Ciudad Blanca

at Fotografica Bogota 2013,


The Getty Shares Its Collections


Inez & Vinoodh

at Gagosian Gallery (LA), Beverly Hills


July
Christian Houge: Shadow Within

at Hosfelt Gallery, San Francisco


Party Picks: Estate of Jimmy DeSana

at Salon 94 Bowery, New York


In The Studio

at John Messinger, East Hampton


That Which Is: Marcia Lippman

at KMR Arts, Washington Depot


Ben Lifson, 1941-2013


Jan Banning: Down and Out in the South

at Hagedorn Foundation Gallery, Atlanta


Tom Wood: Men and Women

at Thomas Erben Gallery, New York


From the Ground Up: The Tent Camera Photographs of Abelardo Morell

at Stephen Daiter Gallery, Chicago


Portion Control: Chrisopher Boffoli

at Winston Wachter Fine Art, New York


June
Bing Wright: Broken Mirror/Evening Sky

at James Harris Gallery, Seattle


A Different Kind of Order: The International Center of Photography Triennial

at International Center of Photography, New York


JR / Jose Parla, Wrinkles of the City, Havana Cuba

at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery, New York


May
David Hilliard: The Tale is True

at Carroll And Sons, Boston


Japan's Modern Divide: Photographs by Hiroshi Hamaya and Kansuke Yamamoto

at Getty Center, Los Angeles


Michael Jang: The Jangs

at Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco


David Levinthal: War Games

at Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.


Mike Brodie's Period of Juvenile Prosperity


Spectator Sports

at Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago


Joshua Lutz: Hesitating Beauty

at ClampArt, New York


April
Shiprock and Mont St. Michel: Photographs by William Clift

at New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe


Garry Winogrand

at SFMOMA, San Francisco


Liliana Porter: 1973

at Barbara Krakow Gallery, Boston


In The Studio

at Dillon DeWaters, Brooklyn


AIPAD's Photography Show


Bruce Davidson


March
Bill Brandt: Shadow and Light

at Museum of Modern Art, New York


Iwan Baan: The Way We Live

at Perry Rubenstein Gallery, Los Angeles


Suburbia

at Hagedorn Foundation Gallery, Atlanta


Julie Weitz

at The Suburban, Oak Park


Armory Show 2013

at Armory Show, New York


Scope New York 2013

at SCOPE New York, New York


ADAA Art Show 2013

at ADAA Art Show, New York


Shooting Stars: Publicity Stills from Early Hollywood and Portraits by Andy Warhol

at Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.


February
Topsy Turvy in Madison Square Park


JoAnn Verburg: Present Tense

at G. Gibson Gallery, Seattle


Miles Barth Joins Artnet


The Unphotographable

at Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco


Katrina del Mar: Girls Girls Girls

at Participant, Inc., New York


Robin Rhode: Take Your Mind off the Street

at Lehmann Maupin (26th St), New York


Arne Svenson: The Neighbors

at Western Project, Culver City


January
Silvio Wolf: Us

at Bruce Silverstein Gallery, New York


Beat Memories: The Photographs of Allen Ginsberg

at Grey Art Gallery, New York


Katherine Bussard Named Curator at
Princeton Art Museum


Catherine Wagner: trans/literate.

at Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco


Karl Baden: Roadside Attractions

at Miller Yezerski Gallery, Boston


Viviane Sassen on View


January is for Hot Shots


Richard Pare: The Lost Vanguard: Soviet Modernist Architecture, 1922–32

at Graham Foundation, Chicago


2012
December
Faking it: Manipulated Photography Before Photoshop

at Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York


Idris Khan: New Photographs

at Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco


Jessica Eaton: Polytopes

at M+B Gallery, Los Angeles


Nadav Kander: Yangtze: The Long River

at Flowers, New York


Ori Gersht: History Repeating

at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Boston


Attachments

at The Hole, New York


1979:1—2012:21: Jan Tichy Works with the MoCP Collection

at Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago


Bonni Benrubi, 1953-2012


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