LOCATIONS FILTERS

Dan Weiner: Vintage New York, 1940-1959

June 7 - July 28

515 W 26th St 2nd fl New York, NY +

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Dan Weiner: Vintage New York, 1940-1959

June 7 - July 28

Steven Kasher Gallery is pleased to present Dan Weiner: Vintage New York, 1940-1959 the first solo exhibition of the photographer’s work in over a decade. The exhibition consists of vintage black and white prints made between 1940 and 1959. The exhibition focuses on Weiner’s New York work, highlighting the photographer’s roots in, love for, and inspired representations of his home city. Weiner’s portrayal of city life during a period of explosive growth and economic expansion is at once caring, inquisitive and critical, with a pronounced sociological bent. Also on view is the exhibition Sandra Weiner: New York Kids, 1940-1966. This is the first time that exhibitions of the husband and wife photographers have been on view concurrently.
Weiner is one of the original “concerned photographers.” In 1940 he joined the Photo League, a group of socially minded photographers including Paul Strand, W. Eugene Smith, Aaron Siskind and Dorothea Lange. Soon he was teaching an advanced class at the League. While taking part in Sid Grossman’s Documentary Class, out of which grew the “East Side Group,” Weiner photographed people and events around the Lower East Side. As his wife Sandra, whom he met during this period, later wrote, it was “an inspiring period for a young photographer.” Weiner firmly believed in the power of the camera to highlight social and economic problems and affect change.
In her extended 1989 New Yorker story about the exhibition America Worked: The 1950s Photographs of Dan Weiner at the Museum of Modern Art, Ingrid Sischy wrote, “[Weiner’s] ‘decisive moment’ was different from Cartier-Bresson’s: it wasn’t the instant that stands out because what’s happening is so exceptional; it was the stretch of time when supposedly nothing much is going on. And that’s why everything is there- all the dynamics between people which most other photographers missed because they were holding out for the remarkable. It’s clear why Garry Winogrand, who sought that same artlessness in his snapshots, admired Weiner’s work….These photographs treat the workday and domestic life of the fifties as though it were as much a subject for revelation as the court was in Velasquez’s time, or the battlefield in Delacroix’s.”
The images in the exhibition are largely taken from Weiner’s extended project in Yorkville. Weiner photographed the working-class neighborhood in-depth. At the time, the tenement apartments in Yorkville were so cramped that much of the social interactions of both adults and children took place in the streets, facilitating Weiner’s access to his subjects. These photographs emerged from a larger photographic endeavor, “Neighborhoods of New York”, a Photo League project spearheaded by Consuelo Kanaga to document specific neighborhoods in the city.
Weiner remains one of the most important and most eloquent documentarians of life in the 1940s and 1950s. In recent decades. Weiner’s work has been inadequately honored, even though his professional career was extensive over the ten years before his untimely death. Weiner died at age 39, on assignment in Kentucky, when a small plane, piloted by the subject of his story, slammed into a mountainside during a freak snowstorm. After Weiner’s death, Walker Evans said “There have always been a few serious, gifted hands working in photography, since its beginnings. Dan Weiner was one of them.” Edward Steichen said, “The small rank of fine photographers has been cruelly thinned by the loss of Dan Weiner.” More bluntly, Arthur Miller wrote, “The death of such a phenomenon is inadmissible.”
Dan Weiner (1919-1959) was born and raised in New York City. He studied at the Art Students League in 1937 and at Pratt Institute from 1939 to 1940. He assisted commercial photographer Valentino Sarra from 1940-1942 and simultaneously joined the Photo League. During World War II, he served as an air force photographer and in 1946 returned to New York to establish a commercial studio. Switching to photojournalism in 1949, Weiner traveled to Eastern Europe, to the American South and to South Africa. His photographs appeared in important publications including Fortune, Collier’s, This Week, Life, and Look. He had his first one-man show in 1953 at the Camera Club of New York, which later traveled around the country. In 1956 Weiner covered the Montgomery, Alabama bus boycott for Collier’s. His photographs of Martin Luther King, Jr. and the civil rights struggle in Montgomery are among the most iconic and effective records of those dramatic events. In 1967, his work was included in the seminal 1967 exhibition and catalogue The Concerned Photographer, curated by Cornell Capa, alongside Robert Capa, Werner Bischof, David Seymour, Leonard Freed and André Kertész.
Weiner’s work has been exhibited at institutions including the Museum of Modern Art, Musée de l’Elysée, New York Public Library, International Center of Photography and the Bronx Museum of Art. Weiner’s work in included in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, International Center of Photography, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Nelson-Atkins Museum, Museum of Fine Arts Houston, National Portrait Gallery,  Smithsonian American Art Museum, and the Art Institute of Chicago. Monographs of Weiner’s work include Dan Weiner, 1919-1959 and America Worked: The 1950s Photographs of Dan Weiner. His photographs are included in The Civil Rights Movement: A Photographic History, 1954-68; Photography of the Fifties: An American Perspective; The Consolidated Freightways, Inc. Collection; and American Images: Photography 1945-1980.
Dan Weiner: Vintage New York, 1940-1959 will be on view June 7th-July 27th, 2018 at Steven Kasher Gallery, located at 515 W. 26th St., New York, NY 10001. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10 AM to 6 PM. For more information about the exhibition and all other general inquiries, please contact Cassandra Johnson, 212 966 3978, cassandra@stevenkasher.com


Press Release

Steven Kasher Gallery

515 W 26th St 2nd fl New York, NY 10001

212.966.3978

info@stevenkasher.com

Open Tues-Sat 10-6

Summer Hours: Mon-Fri 10-6



Cait Carouge, Alyse Ronayne: Angel in the House

June 16 - July 21

321 Washington Ave, Brooklyn, NY, +

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Cait Carouge, Alyse Ronayne: Angel in the House

June 16 - July 21

CAIT CAROUGE AND ALYSE RONAYNE
ANGEL IN THE HOUSE
JUNE 16-JULY 21
OPENING RECEPTION:
SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 6–9 PM
321 Gallery presents Angel in the House, a two-person exhibition of photographs and sculpture by Cait Carouge and Alyse Ronayne.

Hung on the left, right and rear walls of the gallery are three photographs measuring 51 x 33 inches in white frames. Rich blacks, luminous oranges, and hazy pinks flood angular planes. Carouge’s images of light and color appear filmic, and only through photographic fidelity describe their construction.

Placed on the floor, congruent with the walls, are five low, irregularly shaped sculptures of varying sizes. Each shape recalls floor patches assembled from scrap wood, embedded in the otherwise typical blonde-wood gallery floor. These eccentric anomalies fill gaps once occupied by walls–walls which formed closets and doorways in the space’s previous configuration. Ronayne’s architectural forms are constructed of 1/4 inch hot rolled steel plates, cut by waterjet, which are placed over corresponding shapes cut from 1/2 rebond carpet padding.

“Had I not killed her she would have killed me. She would have plucked the heart out of my writing. For, as I found, directly I put pen to paper, you cannot review even a novel without having a mind of your own, without expressing what you think to be the truth about human relations, morality, sex. And all these questions, according to the Angel of the House, cannot be dealt with freely and openly by women; they must charm, they must conciliate, they must–to put it bluntly–tell lies if they are to succeed. Thus, whenever I felt the shadow of her wing or the radiance of her halo upon my page, I took up the inkpot and flung it at her. She died hard. Her fictitious nature was of great assistance to her. It is far harder to kill a phantom than a reality.” – Virginia Woolf, “Professions for Women,” 1931

Cait Carouge (b. 1985, Baltimore, MD) is a photographer living and working in Brooklyn, New York. Her work has been shown both locally and nationally, including exhibitions at In Limbo and The Knockdown Center (Brooklyn, NY). She earned a BS in Communications at Boston University (Boston, MA); a Post-Baccalaureate degree at Maryland Institute College of Art (Baltimore, MD); and an MFA from Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University (New Brunswick, NJ).

Alyse Ronayne (b. 1986, Detroit, MI) is an artist living and working in Brooklyn, NY. Ronayne received a BFA in printmaking from the Maryland Institute College of Art (Baltimore, MD) in 2008 and an MFA in painting from the Milton Avery School of the Arts at Bard College (Annandale-on-Hudson, NY) in 2015, where she was awarded the Elaine DeKooning Fellowship in Painting and a Teaching Fellowship in the Sculpture department. Her work has been exhibited nationally and is held in both public and private collections. Her work has recently been exhibited at Jeff Bailey Gallery (Hudson, NY), the Fosdick-Nelson Gallery at Alfred University (Alfred, NY), Soloway (Brooklyn, NY), and the Leslie Lohman Museum (New York, NY). In 2016 Ronayne founded the roving curatorial project IN LIMBO, and was awarded an Engagement Grant by the Rema Hort Mann Foundation for the project’s continuation in 2018.


321 Gallery

321 Washington Ave, Brooklyn, NY, 11205, USA

321@321GALLERY.ORG

Open Sat 12–5


Brenda Bancel: Continuing Work In India and Indonesia

June 1 - August 30

555 E 2nd St Boston, MA +

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Brenda Bancel: Continuing Work In India and Indonesia

June 1 - August 30


555 Gallery

555 E 2nd St Boston, MA 02127

857.496.7234

gallery@555gallery.com

Open Tues-Fri 10-5:30, Sat 12-5



Ben Depp: Bayou’s End

April 5 - September 27

241 Chartres St New Orleans, LA +

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Ben Depp: Bayou’s End

April 5 - September 27

Bayou’s End, A Gallery for Fine Photography’s exhibition of photographs by Ben Depp, captures the rapidly changing landscape of Southern Louisiana from the birds-eye perspective of a motor-powered paraglider piloted by the artist himself. The incredible risk required to make these photographs is not always apparent in the images themselves; Depp must navigate changing wind conditions and avoid obstacles while not dropping his camera or being dropped himself, often while flying mere feet above the water’s surface. Depp’s photographs function as both documentary and fine art, contributing meaningfully to the ongoing dialogue on Louisiana’s wetland loss while simultaneously transcending this context.


A Gallery for Fine Photography

241 Chartres St New Orleans, LA 70130

504.568.1313

joshuamann@att.net

Open Thur-Mon 10:30-5


Gun Country

March 10 - July 31

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA +

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Gun Country

March 10 - July 31

Issues of gun ownership, culture, and violence continue to divide the United States. Gun Country​ explores representations of firearms in the Addison’s collection in order to examine the historical underpinnings of the country’s gun fascination. On view in the Museum Learning Center, these objects are shown together for the first time and serve as an invitation to a community discussion of the pervasive cultural iconography of the gun in America.


Press Release

Addison Gallery of American Art

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA 01810

978.749.4015

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5

Summer Hours: Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5; closed Mondays, July 4, and the month of August



Photographers Among Us

April 7 - July 31

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA +

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Photographers Among Us

April 7 - July 31

​​Drawn from the museum’s collection, Photographers Among Us​ presents a selection of 20th-century documentary works. From Lewis Hine’s photographs of child laborers in 1910 to Danny Lyon’s images of Texas prison inmates in the late 1960s, many of the pictures included exhibit a civic consciousness. Mirrors of their times, produced for newspapers, magazines, photobooks, government-sponsored projects, or the United States Army, photographs in this exhibition have become historical agents, shaping our understanding of the past.​


Addison Gallery of American Art

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA 01810

978.749.4015

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5

Summer Hours: Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5; closed Mondays, July 4, and the month of August



Jerry Birchfield: Asleep in the Dust

March 24 - September 23

One South High Akron, OH +

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Jerry Birchfield: Asleep in the Dust

March 24 - September 23

Photography has a weighty history as an art medium and as a tool to record our daily lives. We tend to seek value in what pictures are of rather than in physical photographic objects. The work of Jerry Birchfield examines this tendency to privilege images using photography, sculpture, drawing and text. Jerry Birchfield: Asleep in the Dust highlights the artist’s iterative process through which he creates works of art that blur boundaries between image, object, subject and meaning.

Birchfield applies layers of darkroom processes to achieve untraditional gelatin silver prints. Unlike most printed photographs, Birchfield’s are unique, as each sheet of paper retains traces of physical acts performed in the darkroom. Camera-based film negatives are enlarged onto light-sensitive paper that is partially obstructed by other materials (the technique used to make photograms). Chemicals then develop the latent image and further stretch contrast, tone and texture, sometimes introducing or erasing major compositional elements. In these highly constructed photographs, meaning emerges as much from the process of their production as from the recognizable imagery they contain.

Slivers of visible images reveal dusty, debris-laden surfaces that were in fact created to be photographed. Every aspect of Birchfield’s work emerges from the isolated space of his studio, where scraps, detritus and unfinished works often reappear in new iterations of ideas. In some cases, photographs become sculptures—by encasing prints in plaster, Birchfield masks their images and warps the paper. Viewers are confronted by the space that the photograph and the surrounding plaster occupy, which corresponds to the dimensions of a photograph in a standard frame.

Anchoring the exhibition, a raised platform in the center of the gallery references the importance of the act of framing for Birchfield. Its structure incorporates rectangular horizontal sections that are covered in glass, referencing common picture frames. Like amateur actors, sculptures that appear to mimic everyday objects are assembled on the stage. Some of these sculptures were created for past projects; others were made from fragments of cast-off materials—they have emerged from the dust of Birchfield’s studio.

—Elizabeth M. Carney, Assistant Curator, Akron Art Museum

Jerry Birchfield: Asleep in the Dust is organized by the Akron Art Museum with support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and the Ohio Arts Council.


Akron Art Museum

One South High Akron, OH 44308

330.376.9185

Open Wed-Sun 11-5, Thur 11-9


Nicholas Muellner: In Most Tides An Island

June 23 - September 2

2 Hylan Boulevard Staten Island, NY +

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Nicholas Muellner: In Most Tides An Island

June 23 - September 2


Alice Austen House Museum

2 Hylan Boulevard Staten Island, NY 10305

718.816.4506

Open Tues-Sun 11-5


Diane Arbus: Diane Arbus: A box of ten photographs

April 6, 2018 - January 27, 2019

Eighth & F St NW Washington, DC +

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Diane Arbus: Diane Arbus: A box of ten photographs

April 6, 2018 - January 27, 2019

In late 1969, Diane Arbus began to work on a portfolio. At the time of her death in 1971, she had completed the printing for eight known sets of A box of ten photographs, of a planned edition of fifty, only four of which she sold during her lifetime. Two were purchased by photographer Richard Avedon; another by artist Jasper Johns. A fourth was purchased by Bea Feitler, art director at Harper’s Bazaar, for whom Arbus added an eleventh photograph.

This exhibition traces the history of A box of ten photographs between 1969 and 1973, using the set that Arbus assembled for Feitler, which was acquired by the Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) in 1986. The story is a crucial one because it was the portfolio that established the foundation for Arbus’s posthumous career, ushering in photography’s acceptance to the realm of “serious” art. After his encounter with Arbus and the portfolio, Philip Leider, then editor in chief of Artforum and a photography skeptic, admitted, “With Diane Arbus, one could find oneself interested in photography or not, but one could no longer. . . deny its status as art. . . . What changed everything was the portfolio itself.”

In May 1971, Arbus was the first photographer to be featured in Artforum, which also showcased her work on its cover. In June 1972, the portfolio was sent to Venice, where Arbus was the first photographer included in a Biennale, at that time the premiere international showcase for contemporary artists. SAAM organized the American contribution to the Biennale that year, thereby playing an important early role in Arbus’s legacy.


Smithsonian American Art Museum

Eighth & F St NW Washington, DC 20004

202.633.1000

Open daily 11:30-7



Trevor Paglen: Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen

June 21, 2018 - January 6, 2019

Eighth & F St NW Washington, DC +

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Trevor Paglen: Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen

June 21, 2018 - January 6, 2019

Trevor Paglen blurs the lines between art, science, and investigative journalism to construct unfamiliar and at times unsettling ways to see and interpret the world around us. Inspired by the landscape tradition, he captures the same horizon seen by American photographers Timothy O’Sullivan in the nineteenth century and Ansel Adams in the twentieth. Only in Paglen’s photographs is the infrastructure of surveillance also apparent—a classified military installation, a spy satellite, a tapped communications cable, a drone, an artificial intelligence (AI).

Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen is a mid-career survey, the first exhibition to present Paglen’s early photographic series alongside his recent sculptural objects and new work with AI. It carries on the long history of programs by the Smithsonian American Art Museum examining America’s changing relationship to the landscape. With this presentation, SAAM is contributing to the important and ongoing conversation about privacy and surveillance in contemporary society.

Paglen’s photographs show something we are not meant to see, whose concealment he regards as symptomatic of the historical moment we inhabit. His objects act in opposition to what his images have exposed, imagining another and potentially different world. Paglen is a conceptual artist with activist intentions. Helping to better see the particular moment we live in and producing spaces in which to envision alternative futures are among his chief concerns.

Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen is organized by John Jacob, SAAM’s McEvoy Family Curator for Photography, and is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue.


Smithsonian American Art Museum

Eighth & F St NW Washington, DC 20004

202.633.1000

Open daily 11:30-7



Ellen Carey: Ellen Carey: Dings, Pulls, and Shadows

January 20 - July 22

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX +

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Ellen Carey: Ellen Carey: Dings, Pulls, and Shadows

January 20 - July 22

Since the 1990s, experimental photographer Ellen Carey has been making photographs that defy photographic conventions of depicting identifiable subjects. Instead, her works depict vibrant fields of color that are meditations on the very nature of photography as an image created by the action of light on a light-sensitive surface. The exhibition Ellen Carey: Dings, Pulls, and Shadows features seven key works that explore the artist’s interest in color, light, and the photographic process as the subject of her practice.


Amon Carter Museum of American Art

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX 76107

817.738.1933

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Thur 10-8, Sun 12-5



Jan Staller: CYCLE and SAVED

February 24 - August 19

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX +

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Jan Staller: CYCLE and SAVED

February 24 - August 19

These two short videos by New York photographer-videographer Jan Staller reflect on a potent contradiction of contemporary material life. Where CYCLE revels in the powerful abstracting of paper traveling at high speed down a conveyer belt on its first step to being recycled, SAVED is a playful celebration of hundreds of small tools and toys accumulated over the years by the artist. Together these videos ask us to reflect on what we choose to keep and what we throw away.


Amon Carter Museum of American Art

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX 76107

817.738.1933

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Thur 10-8, Sun 12-5