LOCATIONS FILTERS

Dennis Dinneen: Small Town Portraits

October 6 - December 23

3115 E Shadowlawn Ave Atlanta, GA +

+

Dennis Dinneen: Small Town Portraits

October 6 - December 23


Jackson Fine Art

3115 E Shadowlawn Ave Atlanta, GA 30305

404.233.3739

info@jacksonfineart.com

Open Tues-Sat 10-5



John Lipkowitz: “Not Just Flowers”

October 6 - October 29

510 Warren St Hudson, NY +

+

John Lipkowitz: “Not Just Flowers”

October 6 - October 29

Images of the Netherlands


Press Release

510 Warren St Gallery

510 Warren St Hudson, NY 12534

518.822.0510

510warrenstgallery@gmail.com

Open Fri-Sat 12-6, Sun 12-5


Josephine Sacabo: Barking At God – Retablos Mundanos

October 14 - December 31

241 Chartres St New Orleans, LA +

+

Josephine Sacabo: Barking At God – Retablos Mundanos

October 14 - December 31

 

In Mexico I am working hard putting the finishing touches on my new series BARKING AT GOD- RETABLOS MUNDANOS which will open on Oct 14, 2017 at A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY in New Orleans.

 

I began working on the images one day out of anguish and grief and I ended up rescued by a depth of meaning I never meant to touch really.

 

The resulting 40 images are 22X28 inch hand colored photogravures combining the graffiti of New Orleans with religious imagery from San Miguel in Mexico- the dueling iconographies of the two places I call homeI have no final judgement to make on the subjects. Each expression is presented with it’s consolations and it’s cruelties. They are what they are and I hope the viewer finds something in them that speaks to what they themselves may have experienced, needed or felt.

 

-Josephine Sacabo


A Gallery for Fine Photography

241 Chartres St New Orleans, LA 70130

504.568.1313

joshuamann@att.net

Open Thur-Mon 10:30-5


Micro/Macro: Views of Earth by Marilyn Bridges and Jeannette Klute

September 2, 2017 - March 11, 2018

One South High Akron, OH +

+

Micro/Macro: Views of Earth by Marilyn Bridges and Jeannette Klute

September 2, 2017 - March 11, 2018

Marilyn Bridges and Jeannette Klute both chose Earth’s natural and human-touched terrain as their subject matter. Micro/Macro illustrates how photographs of the Earth on both an intimate and aerial scale can be disorienting as well as familiar, and the inherent compositional parallels between the work of two very different artists.

Bridges photographs sites around the world that show signs of past or present human activities. Looking down from the open door of a small plane flying at an altitude between 300 and 1000 feet, her aerial photographs record a visual experience that is neither like standing on the ground, nor looking out the window of a commercial jet. Her black and white images flatten Earth’s terrain into patterns of light, dark and texture. Exact scale and orientation are not clear except through detailed examination.

Klute is known for her contributions to the technical development and expressive value of color photography in the mid-1900s, when few artistic photographers used color processes. She was hired by Eastman Kodak in 1939, one of few women in the field at the time, and by 1945 was head of the visual research studio in the company’s color technology division. Klute tested a variety of subjects and environments in her research and art, often turning to nature as a source of myriad colors and textures. Her photographs of tide pools emphasize the colors and patterns in these micro environments, with overall compositions that decline to privilege particular objects but rather aim to translate the fascination and wonder she felt towards shore life.

The photographs featured in Micro/Macro: Views of Earth by Marilyn Bridges and Jeannette Klute come from the collection of the Akron Art Museum.

This exhibition is organized by the Akron Art Museum and is supported by the Ohio Arts Council. 


Akron Art Museum

One South High Akron, OH 44308

330.376.9185

Open Wed-Sun 11-5, Thur 11-9


Anderson & Low, John Patrick Dugdale, George Dureau, Connie Imboden, José Villarrubia, Reed Massengill, and others: Man, Idea, Image: Photographs of Men from the Mark Rice Collection

August 30 - December 12

Reception: Thurs December 7, 4-6pm

1000 Hilltop Circle Baltimore, MD +

+

Anderson & Low, John Patrick Dugdale, George Dureau, Connie Imboden, José Villarrubia, Reed Massengill, and others: Man, Idea, Image: Photographs of Men from the Mark Rice Collection

August 30 - December 12

Reception: Thurs December 7, 4-6pm

This exhibition presents images of the male body in contemporary photographs from the Mark Rice Collection. Engaging the complicated dynamics of looking at the male form, the myriad meanings, narratives, metaphors, mythologies, fears and celebrations of the male body are contemplated in the context of the history of art broadly, and post-Stonewall culture and the AIDS crisis specifically.

The exhibition is curated by Dr. James Smalls and organized by the UMBC Library Gallery.


Press Release

Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

1000 Hilltop Circle Baltimore, MD 21250

410.455.2270

Open Mon-Fri 10-4:30, Thur 12-8, Sat-Sun 12-5



Shared Space: A New Era

October 1, 2017 - April 22, 2018

258 Main St Ridgefield, CT +

+

Shared Space: A New Era

October 1, 2017 - April 22, 2018

The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum is pleased to present Shared Space: A New Era, an exhibition of photographs and video from 1987 through 2010 that considers the world’s social, economic, and political climate over the past thirty years and how the growing impact of technology during this time, with radically increased and diversified communication, has introduced a new phase of globalization. This exhibition has been curated by Lillian Lambrechts from the Bank of America Collection and is on loan from its Art in our Communities® program.

Shared Space features contemporary artists from twelve countries: the United States, Great Britain, Canada, Germany, the Netherlands, India, Iran, Italy, Japan, Mexico, the Czech Republic, and Switzerland. These artists capture myriad spaces for communication and interaction—urban and rural landscapes, homes and backyards, city streets and plazas, and ports and terminals. The exhibition’s point of departure is 1987, a seminal year that marks the signing of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty by Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev, and soon thereafter the fall of the Berlin Wall, events marking the end of the Cold War and the beginning of a new age of international exchange.

Sze Tsung Leong’s cityscapes illustrate the impact of a global economy. Thomas Ruff’s and Günther Förg’s photographs show the rapid transformation of the built environment through images of Modernist architecture constructed upon utopian ideals, now derelict and failing to realize its original intention. Photographs by Raghubir Singh, Thomas Struth, and Massimo Vitali depict masses of people gathering in public spaces from Los Angeles to Vietnam, and the Netherlands—expressing an unprecedented universality of access to information. Despite the interconnectivity of this time, a distancing and disconnect remains between individuals and groups, near and afar, as evidenced in Ben Gest’s Jessica & Samantha (2003), family members in close physical proximity who seem deeply psychologically distanced from one another. Shared Space reminds viewers of their place in the world and their role and impact on current global and interpersonal affairs while also provoking them to consider how they will contribute to “shared space” in the future.

“Bank of America is committed to strengthening artistic institutions and in turn, the communities we serve,” said Bill Tommins, Bank of America Southern Connecticut Market President. “Sharing our collection with the public through partners such as The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum not only makes business sense for the bank, but also helps support museums in Connecticut.”

For press inquiries, please contact Emily Devoe at 203.438.4519, extension 140, or edevoe@aldrichart.org

Shared Space: A New Era is generously supported by the Bank of America Art in our Communities® program and Crozier.


Press Release

Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum

258 Main St Ridgefield, CT 06877

203.438.4519

Open Mon, Wed-Sat 10-5, Sun 12-5


Dornith Doherty: Dornith Doherty: Archiving Eden

August 12, 2017 - January 14, 2018

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX +

+

Dornith Doherty: Dornith Doherty: Archiving Eden

August 12, 2017 - January 14, 2018

Over the decade, North Texas photographer Dornith Doherty has traveled the globe to construct a visual meditation on the planet’s botanical diversity by showcasing the work of international seed banks and sharing the pure aesthetic pleasure of seeds and their transformations into plants. This exhibition celebrates the completion of that project. At a time when some ecologists are suggesting that we are losing more than ten animal and plant species each day, the display provides eloquent confirmation of the close relationship between botany and biophilia.


Amon Carter Museum of American Art

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX 76107

817.738.1933

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Thur 10-8, Sun 12-5


Paul Bulteel: Waste Not

September 20 - November 22

143 Ludlow St New York, NY +

+

Paul Bulteel: Waste Not

September 20 - November 22

The world is consuming at unprecedented rates. Three and a half million tons of waste is generated globally every day. By 2100, that figure is expected to triple to a daily rate of 11 million. With a directive to mitigate its environmental effects, Bulteel’s home country of Belgium consistently ranks one of the best in the world at recycling, boasting a rate of 62 percent. Comparatively, the US stands at 35 percent.

Waste Not exhibits scenes from the extensive recycling systems working to restore materials for reuse. Since 2013, Bulteel has photographed 50 companies active in collecting, sorting, recycling and reclaiming waste across Western Europe. His work aims to document a variety of waste streams and make viewers aware of the enormous quantities of materials left behind. Waste Not illustrates and encourages efforts to recycle waste on an unprecedented scale.


Anastasia Photo

143 Ludlow St New York, NY 10002

212.677.9725

kaley@anastasia-photo.com

Open Tues-Sun 11-7



Adrian Fernandez, Elliott Erwitt, Hermes Mallea, Leysis Quesada Vera, Luis Gispert, Michael Christopher Brown, Michael Dweck, Raul Canibano, Rene Pena, Tria Giovan: Cuba Is

September 8, 2017 - March 5, 2018

2000 Avenue of the Stars Los Angeles, CA +

+

Adrian Fernandez, Elliott Erwitt, Hermes Mallea, Leysis Quesada Vera, Luis Gispert, Michael Christopher Brown, Michael Dweck, Raul Canibano, Rene Pena, Tria Giovan: Cuba Is

September 8, 2017 - March 5, 2018


Annenberg Space For Photography

2000 Avenue of the Stars Los Angeles, CA 90067

213.403.3000

info@annenbergspaceforphotography.org

Open Wed-Sun 11-6



Claude Iverné: Bilad es Sudan

September 15 - November 9

547 W 27th St, 4th floor, New York, NY +

+

Claude Iverné: Bilad es Sudan

September 15 - November 9

Expanding on Claude Iverné’s previous body of work in North Sudan, Bilad es Sudan records the precipitous transformation of South Sudan, mapping its historical details and contemporary contours.

Iverné is the winner of the 2015 Henri Cartier-Bresson Award, and this exhibition is presented in collaboration with the Fondation d’entreprise Hermès, Aperture Foundation and the Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson.

Opening Reception: Thursday, September 14, 7:00–8:00pm


Press Release

Aperture Gallery & Bookstore

547 W 27th St, 4th floor, New York, NY 10001

212.505.5555

info@aperture.org

Open Mon-Sat 10-5:30



The Photographer’s Curator: Hugh Edwards at the Art Institute of Chicago

May 24 - October 29

111 S Michigan Ave Chicago, IL +

Leigh Ledare: The Plot-Ruttenberg Contemporary Photography Series

September 9 - December 31

111 S Michigan Ave Chicago, IL +

+

Leigh Ledare: The Plot-Ruttenberg Contemporary Photography Series

September 9 - December 31

Leigh Ledare (American, born 1976) pushes social systems to lay bare their underlying structures. His projects, which often rely on the enactment of complex social situations, are fundamentally collaborative; agency and authorship in these situations depend on interpersonal negotiations with and before the camera.

Recently, Ledare adapted an experiential group psychology method developed by the Tavistock Institute as a means to explore these ideas. Enacted through a series of conversations among teams of participants and psychologists over the course of a multiday conference, this approach constructs a social “ecosystem” designed for the group’s self-analysis. The Tavistock method helps participants develop a set of tools for investigating individual authority and identity as they relate to factors
such as race, gender, sexuality, and socioeconomics. Ledare transforms the method with one key modification: the presence of the artist and cameras as observers and collaborators during the meetings. This intervention causes shifts in the established structures of authority as well as assumed boundaries among the participants and psychologists—and it calls attention, by analogy, to the power relations binding artist, subject, and viewer in the making and display of works of art.

At the center of this exhibition is The Task, a film directed by Ledare based on a three-day Tavistock conference he organized in Chicago—a project that involved recruiting 30 participants, securing the collaboration of 10 psychologists trained in the method, and directing a film crew. Complex patterns of stereotyping and other projections of identity emerge through the participants’ discussions; authority is questioned, assumed, and taken away; and viewers are implicated as the participants become aware of subjective forces that exist beyond the imposed boundaries of the Tavistock system. The Task is accompanied by a series of photographs and assemblages of found mass media images, which act as allegories to the film’s chapters. With Ledare at its core, the entire project presents a highly structured series of dialectical encounters between the private and public, the individual and the group, and experience and representation.


Art Institute of Chicago

111 S Michigan Ave Chicago, IL 60603

312.443.3600

Open daily 10:30-5, Thur 10:30-8