LOCATIONS FILTERS

Robert Alexander, Audre Lorde: Powerful and Dangerous: The Words and Images of Audre Lorde

March 22 - June 28

2 Hylan Boulevard Staten Island, NY +

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Robert Alexander, Audre Lorde: Powerful and Dangerous: The Words and Images of Audre Lorde

March 22 - June 28

The Alice Austen House presents the 1983 landmark press photo series of Audre Lorde by Robert Alexander. 

Powerful and Dangerous will explore the relationship between language and activism as well as how photographic composition conveys different messages. The exhibition will hold up a lens to the contemporary women’s movement and consider how Lorde’s words resonate today. During the 3-month exhibition, there will be a series of public programs, including scholars talks, readings, and artist-led photo walks in the Staten Island neighborhood of Stapleton where Lorde’s home, now an LGBTQ Historic landmark, is located.

News of the spread of novel coronavirus (COVID-19) is causing many concerns and we want to reassure you that we here at the Alice Austen House are taking all advised precautions to keep the public safe. It is with this aim in mind that we are suspending all planned upcoming public programs. All opening receptions have been postponed. However, we will remain open for regular business hours with planned exhibitions on display.  Please check our website for updates and sign up for our mailing list for updated program information.

 


Alice Austen House Museum

2 Hylan Boulevard Staten Island, NY 10305

718.816.4506

Open Tues--Fri 1:00 - 5:00 PM, Sat-Sun 11:00 - 5:00 Closed Monday


Bruce Gilden: LOST AND FIND

February 7 - April 5

1 Fulton Street, New York, NY, USA +

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Bruce Gilden: LOST AND FIND

February 7 - April 5

In collaboration with Magnum Photos, 10 Corso Como New York presents LOST AND FOUND, an exhibition of Bruce Gilden’s early New York street photographs from the mid 70s through 80s as well as his more recent fashion images. The exhibition will be on view in the 10 Corso Como Gallery in Lower Manhattan’s Seaport District, February 7– April 5, 2020. A reception for the artist will be held on Thursday, February 6, 6-8 pm.

LOST AND FOUND is the result of a happy accident: the rediscovery of some 2000-odd rolls of 35mm film from Bruce Gilden’s early days photographing New York City, spanning from 1978 to 1984. The film had been relegated to filing cabinets at the time, yet in the summer of 2017, after a house move, Gilden found it again. These pictures are almost all made without the use of flash, which would become his trademark. As Gilden himself explains, “It’s Bruce Gilden before he really became the known Bruce Gilden.”


Press Release

10 Corso Como New York

1 Fulton Street, New York, NY, USA

212.265.9500

gallery@10corsocomo.nyc

Open Monday-Saturday, 11 am - 7 pm, Sunday 12 pm - 6 pm


Saul Leiter: Saul Leiter: Discoveries From The Slide Archive

March 19 - May 2

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Saul Leiter: Saul Leiter: Discoveries From The Slide Archive

March 19 - May 2

SAUL LEITER: DISCOVERIES FROM THE SLIDE ARCHIVE
The Saul Leiter Foundation is on a treasure hunt.

Somewhere in lower Manhattan, in a climate-controlled storage room, sit hundreds of small rectangular boxes that house tens of thousands of color slides. Inside these paper and plastic (and sometimes metal) slide mounts rest decades’ worth of images captured by Saul Leiter, during daily strolls near his home in New York’s East Village, on vacation with his friends, and traveling abroad on fashion assignments during his relatively brief but highly productive commercial career.

The foundation began excavating this buried treasure in 2018, in a project launched in collaboration with the German scholar Elena Skarke. “My dissertation,” Skarke explains, “is focusing on Saul Leiter’s noncommercial color slides from 1948 to 1970. My project also provides a contribution to the research on color slides as an artistic medium at large. I feel very fortunate that the Saul Leiter Foundation has afforded me the opportunity to be the first scholar examining his original slides.”

The very first displays from Skarke’s slide research were revealed in a projection room within the Japanese exhibition Forever Saul Leiter, which opened at the Bunkamura Museum of Art in Tokyo in January 2020, and in its accompanying catalog by the same name. This presentation at 28 Vignon Street includes some of those works, along with others that are being shown for the first time ever.

For the foundation, the gifts from this project have been abundant, offering us a new perspective on Leiter’s work. We’re finding, for instance, before-and-after shots surrounding well-known images, in some cases showing Saul’s path to the “decisive moment” of capturing the photograph he was after. (We should note, though, that it usually didn’t take him long to find what he was looking for; he tended shoot a scene quickly before moving on.)

The sheer volume of the slide archive—upwards of 60,000 pieces, only several thousand of which we have viewed thus far—has started filling in biographical information about Saul’s life and art. His only series of color nudes, yielding the famous “Lanesville” image in Steidl’s 2006 book Early Color, has been rounded out with the discovery of numerous slide boxes, marked with the artist’s handwritten notes, documenting much more from the 1958 summer trip to the village of Lanesville, Massachusetts, that he took with a group of friends. We are now able to place some of Saul’s early color fashion tests as occurring during this journey. Indeed, his first color fashion work would appear in Harper’s Bazaar just months later in 1958.

“All of the color images on display in this exhibition at 28 Vignon Street are direct digital copies of the original slides,” Elena Skarke says. “The images are not edited, and thus convey the color aesthetic of their original slide film, in most cases Anscochrome or Kodachrome. Many of the dyes in the Anscochrome slides show a loss of density to some extent. This process of aging is happening so evenly that the colors are declining beautifully, like a fading memory. Whereas after more than half a century the images taken with Kodachrome still unfold their characteristic vivid colors.”

Perhaps most exciting of all, we’re seeing entirely new facets of the Leiter oeuvre in these slides—new motifs, new settings, fresh experiments in photography. SLF director Margit Erb and I are learning that our friend Saul, a most prolific artist, always had another trick up his sleeve. “Similar to the focus of a burning glass,” Skarke says, “the small slide film unites Leiter’s genuine vision and the observation of the urban landscape he captured through his camera.”

Michael Parillo, Saul Leiter Foundation




Elliott Erwitt, Henri Cartier-Bresson: 2020 Vision: Elliott Erwitt and Henri Cartier-Bresson, A tribute show to the greatest eyes

January 4 - May 15

241 Chartres St New Orleans, LA +

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Elliott Erwitt, Henri Cartier-Bresson: 2020 Vision: Elliott Erwitt and Henri Cartier-Bresson, A tribute show to the greatest eyes

January 4 - May 15

January 6, 2020 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

A Gallery For Fine Photography

241 Chartres St., New Orleans, LA 70130

Media contact: info@agallery.com, 504-568-1313

www.agallery.com

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Elliott Erwitt and Henri Cartier-Bresson: 2020 Vision 

Opening January 11, 2020 

On View Through May 15, 2020

 

A Gallery for Fine Photography is pleased to open 2020 Vision, a collection of rare  silver gelatin photographs. The exhibit will include ten photographs by Elliott Erwitt and ten photographs by Henri Cartier-Bresson.  2020 Vision will showcase these magnificent photographers side by side for the first time ever. 

2020 Vision will be on view through May 15, 2020. 

Henri Cartier-Bresson

Henri Cartier-Bresson was born on August 22, 1908 in Chanteloup, France. A pioneer in photojournalism, Cartier-Bresson wandered around the world with his camera, becoming completely immersed in his  environment. Considered one of the major artists of the 20th century, he covered many of the world’s biggest events including the Spanish Civil War to the French uprisings in 1968.

For the rest of his life, Cartier-Bresson’s approach to photography would remain much the same. The naturalist in Cartier-Bresson believed that all edits should be done when the image was made. Cartier-Bresson coined the term “the decisive moment” and he never cropped his images. 

Just a few weeks shy of his 96th birthday, Henri Cartier-Bresson passed away at his home in Provence on August 3, 2004.

 

Elliott Erwitt

Erwitt was born on July 26, 1928 in Paris, France, to Jewish- Russian immigrant parents, who moved to Italy. In 1939. When he was ten, his family immigrated to the United States. He studied photography and filmmaking at Los Angeles City College and the New School of Social Research, finishing his education in 1950. In 1951 he was drafted into the army, and discharged in 1953.

Elliott Erwitt served as a photographer’s assistant in the 1950s in the US while stationed in France and Germany. He was influenced by meeting the famous photographers Steichen, Capa and Stryker. Stryker, the former Director of the Farm Security Administration’s photography department, hired Erwitt to work on a photography project for the Standard Oil Company. He then began a freelance photography career and produced work for Collier’s, Look, Life and Holiday. Erwitt was invited to become a member of Magnum Photos by the founder Robert Capa.

Elliott Erwitt has received major attention in the Fine Art Photography arena and is in all of the major museum collections around the world.

Eliott Erwitt still lives in New York City where he continues his fine art photography career at ninety-two years old.  


A Gallery for Fine Photography

241 Chartres St New Orleans, LA 70130

504.568.1313

joshuamann@att.net

Open Thur-Mon 10:30-5



Gordon Parks: Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940-1950

February 1 - April 26

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA +

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Gordon Parks: Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940-1950

February 1 - April 26

​​During the 1940s, American photographer Gordon Parks (1912–2006) grew from a self-taught photographer making portraits and documenting everyday life in Saint Paul and Chicago to a visionary professional shooting for EbonyGlamourSmart Woman, and Life. For the first time, the formative first decade of Parks’s 60-year career is the focus of an exhibition, which brings together 150 photographs and ephemera—including magazines, books, letters, and family pictures. The exhibition will illustrate Parks’s early experiences at the Farm Security Administration, Office of War Information, and Standard Oil (New Jersey), as well as his close relationships with Roy Stryker, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, and Ralph Ellison and reveal how th​ese helped shape his groundbreaking style. A catalog with extensive new research and previously unpublished images accompanies the exhibition.

The exhibition is curated by Philip Brookman, Consulting Curator, Department of Photographs, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., in collaboration with The Gordon Parks Foundation.​ Bank of America is proud to be the national sponsor of ​Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940–1950. Generous support for the Addison Gallery’s presentation of this exhibition has been provided by the Francesca S. Woodman Exhibitions Fund and the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation.


Addison Gallery of American Art

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA 01810

978.749.4015

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5

Summer Hours: Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5; closed Mondays, July 4, and the month of August



Weather Report

October 6, 2019 - April 19, 2020

258 Main St Ridgefield, CT +

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Weather Report

October 6, 2019 - April 19, 2020

Weather Report will reveal the sky as a site where the aesthetic, the romantic, the political, the social, and the scientific co-exist and inform one another. The depiction of weather phenomena in the visual arts is traditionally linked with either landscape painting or photography, but in the last two decades artists have increasingly turned to other media to explore weather and, by extension, the larger subject of the Earth’s atmosphere. Featuring the work of Bigert & Bergström, Barbara Bloom, Sara Bouchard, Nick Cave, Violet Dennison, Bryan Nash Gill, Andy Goldsworthy, Nancy Graves, Ellen Harvey, Ayumi Ishii, Jitish Kallat, Kim Keever, Byron Kim, Damian Loeb, Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle, Colin McMullan, Hitoshi Nomura, Pat Pickett, Sean Salstrom, and Jennifer Steinkamp, and an installation by researchers Amanda Bunce, Joel Salisbury, and Michael Vertefeuille. The exhibition will be accompanied by a publication with an essay by exhibition curator Richard Klein.


Press Release

Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum

258 Main St Ridgefield, CT 06877

203.438.4519

Open Wed-Mon 12-5, Sat 10-5



Eliot Porter: Eliot Porter’s Birds

January 4 - May 10

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX +

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Eliot Porter: Eliot Porter’s Birds

January 4 - May 10

Eliot Porter (1901–1990) set the model for today’s nature photography. While he is internationally celebrated for his colorful renderings of the natural world, Eliot Porter’s Birds highlights his equal, career-long focus on photographing birds. More than thirty photographs and archival objects are presented alongside excerpts from the artist’s extensive writings about his activities, giving visitors an opportunity to feel a direct connection with the artist.

Porter photographed birds almost every spring for more than fifty years, deeply appreciating their colors, variety, and ability to fly. He sought from the start to set a new artistic model for bird photography that aligned with the great lithographs of the nineteenth-century artist-naturalist John James Audubon. Visitors will be able to experience how Porter pushed the limits of photographic technologies through a display of his personally designed camera outfit. Also on view are his research notes for locating and recording his subjects, and a display showing how he went about making his exquisite prints.


Press Release

Amon Carter Museum of American Art

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX 76107

817.738.1933

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Thur 10-8, Sun 12-5



Richard Avedon, Dorothea Lange, Laura Gilpin, Morris Engel, Paul Strand: Looking In: Photography from the Outside

December 21, 2019 - May 10, 2020

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX +

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Richard Avedon, Dorothea Lange, Laura Gilpin, Morris Engel, Paul Strand: Looking In: Photography from the Outside

December 21, 2019 - May 10, 2020

Looking In: Photography from the Outside examines the way artists have photographed groups they are not part of. It takes an in-depth look at series by six important twentieth-century artists who navigated their role as “outsider” differently, raising complicated questions about perception, representation, and power.

This exhibition is drawn from the Carter’s collection, featuring works by Richard Avedon, who took portraits of Hutterites although their official stance is against photography, Morris Engel, who photographed members of a Texas dairy family going about their daily lives, Laura Gilpin, who spent decades taking photographs of close Diné (Navajo) friends, Dorothea Lange, who went with Ansel Adams to photograph rural Mormon towns in Utah, Danny Lyon, who joined the Chicago Outlaw bikeriders and published a book of images and interviews, and Paul Strand, who traveled south and captured what he thought was the essential Mexican national identity.


Amon Carter Museum of American Art

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX 76107

817.738.1933

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Thur 10-8, Sun 12-5



Diane Arbus: Photographs, 1956-1971

February 22 - May 17

317 Dundas Street West, Toronto, Ontario M5T 1G4, Canada +

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Diane Arbus: Photographs, 1956-1971

February 22 - May 17

The striking black and white photographs of legendary American photographer Diane Arbus (1923–1971) revolutionized portraiture. Primarily made in and around New York City, Arbus selected her subjects – including couples, children, nudists, suburban families, circus performers, and celebrities, among others – for their singularity. In 2016, thanks to the generosity of a small group of donors, the AGO acquired the world’s second largest collection of Arbus photographs. The AGO honours that landmark acquisition of 522 works with a major solo exhibition, the first in Canada in almost three decades.

For the first time, images from the full sweep of Arbus’s career will be presented chronologically. Early works reveal an artist gripped by the range of humanity and life as it unfolded on the street, while later works created using a larger format mark her emergence as a mature and compelling artist.

PHOTO: Diane Arbus, Three female impersonators, N.Y.C., 1962. Gelatin silver print; printed 1962–1963, Sheet: 27.9 × 35.6 cm. Art Gallery of Ontario. Anonymous gift, 2016. Copyright © Estate of Diane Arbus


Art Gallery of Ontario

317 Dundas Street West, Toronto, Ontario M5T 1G4, Canada

877.225.4246

Open Tues-Sun 10-5:30, Wed 10-8:30



Emerge 2020 — Student Photography Exhibition

March 14 - April 11

207 N Gilbert Rd, Ste 201 Gilbert, AZ +

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Emerge 2020 — Student Photography Exhibition

March 14 - April 11

Emerge showcases the breadth of talent exhibited by Arizona’s student photographers from high school freshmen to senior citizens. We welcome photographers enrolled in an Arizona high school (including home school students), community college, art school, or university to submit their work for consideration.  This year’s submissions to Emerge will be juried by Kari Wehrs.

As part of our mission to support emerging artists, we offer student artists an opportunity to show their work in the North and South Galleries at Art Intersection. Art Intersection staff will also select recipients for Best of High School, Best of Post-High School, and Best of Show.

Image Credit: Paige Broman.


Art Intersection

207 N Gilbert Rd, Ste 201 Gilbert, AZ 85234

480.361.1118

info@artintersection.com

Open Wednesday - Saturday, 10am - 6pm


Group exhibition of Atlanta Photography Group members. For this group exhibition in the main gallery, we put the power in the artists' hands. Members are invited to choose the photographs they want to exhibit. Don't miss this unique opportunity to see Atlanta’s creative photographic talent.: CHOICE

March 21 - April 18

75 Bennett Street Northwest, Atlanta, Georgia, +

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Group exhibition of Atlanta Photography Group members. For this group exhibition in the main gallery, we put the power in the artists' hands. Members are invited to choose the photographs they want to exhibit. Don't miss this unique opportunity to see Atlanta’s creative photographic talent.: CHOICE

March 21 - April 18

Atlanta Photography Group (APG) presents Choice 2020. For this group exhibition in the main gallery, we put the power in the artists’ hands. Members are invited to choose the photographs they want to exhibit. Don’t miss this unique opportunity to see Atlanta’s creative photographic talent.

Call For Entries: currently open thru March 13

Opening Reception: Saturday, March 21, 3 – 6pm
Exhibition Dates: March 21 – April 18, 2020


Atlanta Photography Group

75 Bennett Street Northwest, Atlanta, Georgia, United States

404.605.0605

gallery@atlantaphotographygroup.org

Open Tues-Sat 12-4



Richard Avedon, Rena Bass Forman, Brassaï, Manuel Álvarez Bravo, Robert Capa, Horst P. Horst, Nadav Kander, André Kertész, O. Winston Link, Ralph Eugene Meatyard, Abelardo Morell, Ron Van Dongen.: Black & White: Photographs from the Julie Riegel and Suzette Clerou Collection

January 30 - August 29

1930 R St Bakersfield, CA +

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Richard Avedon, Rena Bass Forman, Brassaï, Manuel Álvarez Bravo, Robert Capa, Horst P. Horst, Nadav Kander, André Kertész, O. Winston Link, Ralph Eugene Meatyard, Abelardo Morell, Ron Van Dongen.: Black & White: Photographs from the Julie Riegel and Suzette Clerou Collection

January 30 - August 29

Black and white photography, also known as ‘monochrome’ photography, originated during the mid-nineteenth century and has pervaded to this day. A technology-based practice, photographers explore and exploit the levels of abstraction conveyed by reducing a scene to value and shape amidst advances within the field. Paralleled interest is blatant in aficionados, appreciators, and collectors who continue to be mesmerized by monochromatic imagery used to depict a multitude of genres and subjects. Black & White typifies the convergences of the photographer’s exploration and a collector’s passion.

Julie Riegel and Suzette Clerou have been collecting black and white photography since the 1970s. The twenty-five piece collection is an outstanding representation of significant photographic works created over the last 100 years.


Press Release

Bakersfield Museum of Art

1930 R St Bakersfield, CA 93301

661.323.7219

Open Tues-Fri 10-4, , Thur 10-8, Sat-Sun 12-4