LOCATIONS FILTERS

Doug Aitken: New Era

April 13 - May 25

555 West 21st Street, New York, NY, +

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Doug Aitken: New Era

April 13 - May 25

“Hello, My Name is Martin Cooper. In 1973 I invented the very first cellular telephone. Standing on 6th Avenue, New York City, near the Hilton Hotel, I made a phone call. This was the very first public cellphone call.”

303 Gallery presents a new installation by Doug Aitken, titled New Era. On view from April 13 through May 25, 2018, New Era is centered around 89-year-old protagonist Martin Cooper’s seemingly straightforward statements about his invention of the mobile phone and his thoughts on the future. Aitken’s film was inspired by his research into and conversations with the inventor of this ubiquitous device, and weaves the story of Cooper’s life into a poetic narrative about humanity’s history and future. Beginning with this simple introduction, Cooper’s words become the leitmotif of a gradual deconstruction of images and sounds into a dystopian landscape where nature and technology coexist.

New Era functions like a Greek mythology for the 21st century, positing what an age of absolute connectivity might look like. Will it lead to a possibility of a post-human future, where technology could reach the capacity to gradually alter the very essence of our existence?

New Era explores the technological ambivalence of contemporary culture, raising philosophical questions about the challenges of immediate access to communication and network while we distance ourselves from our metaphysical being.

This immersive installation of moving images, expanding architecture and surrounding sound creates a “liquid environment”. The exhibition is set within a hexagonal pavilion built into the gallery space, featuring three projectors set opposite to three mirrored walls. Together, the walls become a 3-dimensional screen—a structure that at once holds and reflects images in a continuous loop, creating a vast and dynamic visual tapestry. The viewer “entering” the screen is no longer a spectator but an interlocutor. The screen dissolves the viewer into a hallucinatory world, distorting their sense of time and self. The work reflects how technology allows for connection, knowledge and communication to take place at light speed.

The exhibition continues in a second room connected to the main installation through a narrow corridor animated by an inexplicable flickering light. Titled Jungle, the single work hanging on a sidewall in an otherwise minimal, empty space is a neon object that glows in space while perpetually changing patterns and rehashing its title in seemingly endless variations. The neon’s pulsating beams of light form distinct iterations of the word “jungle” in a manner that is utterly hypnotic, addictive and unsettling.

New Era questions how technology and ideas of interconnectivity in the virtual reality age can impact our basic humanity.


Press Release

303 Gallery

555 West 21st Street, New York, NY, United States

212.255.1121

Open Tues-Sat 10-6


Ben Depp: Bayou’s End

April 5 - June 1

241 Chartres St New Orleans, LA +

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Ben Depp: Bayou’s End

April 5 - June 1

Bayou’s End, A Gallery for Fine Photography’s exhibition of photographs by Ben Depp, captures the rapidly changing landscape of Southern Louisiana from the birds-eye perspective of a motor-powered paraglider piloted by the artist himself. The incredible risk required to make these photographs is not always apparent in the images themselves; Depp must navigate changing wind conditions and avoid obstacles while not dropping his camera or being dropped himself, often while flying mere feet above the water’s surface. Depp’s photographs function as both documentary and fine art, contributing meaningfully to the ongoing dialogue on Louisiana’s wetland loss while simultaneously transcending this context.


A Gallery for Fine Photography

241 Chartres St New Orleans, LA 70130

504.568.1313

joshuamann@att.net

Open Thur-Mon 10:30-5


Gun Country

March 10 - July 31

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA +

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Gun Country

March 10 - July 31

Issues of gun ownership, culture, and violence continue to divide the United States. Gun Country​ explores representations of firearms in the Addison’s collection in order to examine the historical underpinnings of the country’s gun fascination. On view in the Museum Learning Center, these objects are shown together for the first time and serve as an invitation to a community discussion of the pervasive cultural iconography of the gun in America.


Press Release

Addison Gallery of American Art

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA 01810

978.749.4015

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5



Photographers Among Us

April 7 - July 31

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA +

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Photographers Among Us

April 7 - July 31

​​Drawn from the museum’s collection, Photographers Among Us​ presents a selection of 20th-century documentary works. From Lewis Hine’s photographs of child laborers in 1910 to Danny Lyon’s images of Texas prison inmates in the late 1960s, many of the pictures included exhibit a civic consciousness. Mirrors of their times, produced for newspapers, magazines, photobooks, government-sponsored projects, or the United States Army, photographs in this exhibition have become historical agents, shaping our understanding of the past.​


Addison Gallery of American Art

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA 01810

978.749.4015

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5



George Tice: George Tice at 80: A Retrospective

February 24 - May 5

2800 Routh St Dallas, TX +

Jerry Birchfield: Asleep in the Dust

March 24 - September 23

Reception: Thurs May 17, 6-8pm

One South High Akron, OH +

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Jerry Birchfield: Asleep in the Dust

March 24 - September 23

Reception: Thurs May 17, 6-8pm

Photography has a weighty history as an art medium and as a tool to record our daily lives. We tend to seek value in what pictures are of rather than in physical photographic objects. The work of Jerry Birchfield examines this tendency to privilege images using photography, sculpture, drawing and text. Jerry Birchfield: Asleep in the Dust highlights the artist’s iterative process through which he creates works of art that blur boundaries between image, object, subject and meaning.

Birchfield applies layers of darkroom processes to achieve untraditional gelatin silver prints. Unlike most printed photographs, Birchfield’s are unique, as each sheet of paper retains traces of physical acts performed in the darkroom. Camera-based film negatives are enlarged onto light-sensitive paper that is partially obstructed by other materials (the technique used to make photograms). Chemicals then develop the latent image and further stretch contrast, tone and texture, sometimes introducing or erasing major compositional elements. In these highly constructed photographs, meaning emerges as much from the process of their production as from the recognizable imagery they contain.

Slivers of visible images reveal dusty, debris-laden surfaces that were in fact created to be photographed. Every aspect of Birchfield’s work emerges from the isolated space of his studio, where scraps, detritus and unfinished works often reappear in new iterations of ideas. In some cases, photographs become sculptures—by encasing prints in plaster, Birchfield masks their images and warps the paper. Viewers are confronted by the space that the photograph and the surrounding plaster occupy, which corresponds to the dimensions of a photograph in a standard frame.

Anchoring the exhibition, a raised platform in the center of the gallery references the importance of the act of framing for Birchfield. Its structure incorporates rectangular horizontal sections that are covered in glass, referencing common picture frames. Like amateur actors, sculptures that appear to mimic everyday objects are assembled on the stage. Some of these sculptures were created for past projects; others were made from fragments of cast-off materials—they have emerged from the dust of Birchfield’s studio.

—Elizabeth M. Carney, Assistant Curator, Akron Art Museum

Jerry Birchfield: Asleep in the Dust is organized by the Akron Art Museum with support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and the Ohio Arts Council.


Akron Art Museum

One South High Akron, OH 44308

330.376.9185

Open Wed-Sun 11-5, Thur 11-9


The Metropolis in Latin America, 1830–1930

March 22 - June 30

680 Park Ave New York, NY +

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The Metropolis in Latin America, 1830–1930

March 22 - June 30


Americas Society

680 Park Ave New York, NY 10021

212.249.8950

Open Wed-Sat 12-6


Rania Matar: In Her Image: Photographs by Rania Matar

December 23, 2017 - June 17, 2018

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX +

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Rania Matar: In Her Image: Photographs by Rania Matar

December 23, 2017 - June 17, 2018

This exhibition brings together four bodies of work by the Lebanese-American photographer Rania Matar that trace the development of female identity through portraiture. Depicting transitional moments of life, from young girlhood to middle age, Matar’s works address personal and collective identity through photographs mining female adolescence and womanhood. Photographing girls and women in both the United States and the Middle East, the artist shows how the forces that shape female identity transcend cultural and geographic boundaries.


Amon Carter Museum of American Art

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX 76107

817.738.1933

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Thur 10-8, Sun 12-5



Ellen Carey: Ellen Carey: Dings, Pulls, and Shadows

January 20 - July 22

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX +

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Ellen Carey: Ellen Carey: Dings, Pulls, and Shadows

January 20 - July 22

Since the 1990s, experimental photographer Ellen Carey has been making photographs that defy photographic conventions of depicting identifiable subjects. Instead, her works depict vibrant fields of color that are meditations on the very nature of photography as an image created by the action of light on a light-sensitive surface. The exhibition Ellen Carey: Dings, Pulls, and Shadows features seven key works that explore the artist’s interest in color, light, and the photographic process as the subject of her practice.


Amon Carter Museum of American Art

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX 76107

817.738.1933

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Thur 10-8, Sun 12-5



Jan Staller: CYCLE and SAVED

February 24 - August 19

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX +

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Jan Staller: CYCLE and SAVED

February 24 - August 19

These two short videos by New York photographer-videographer Jan Staller reflect on a potent contradiction of contemporary material life. Where CYCLE revels in the powerful abstracting of paper traveling at high speed down a conveyer belt on its first step to being recycled, SAVED is a playful celebration of hundreds of small tools and toys accumulated over the years by the artist. Together these videos ask us to reflect on what we choose to keep and what we throw away.


Amon Carter Museum of American Art

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX 76107

817.738.1933

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Thur 10-8, Sun 12-5



Guillermo Cervera: Flow

April 4 - May 31

143 Ludlow St New York, NY +

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Guillermo Cervera: Flow

April 4 - May 31

Anastasia Photo is pleased to present Flow, Guillermo Cervera’s second exhibition with the gallery.

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi describes Flow as “a state in which people are so involved in an activity that nothing else seems to matter; the experience is so enjoyable that people will continue to do it even at great cost, for the sheer sake of doing it.”

Best known for his conAlict photography throughout his 25-year career, Cervera’s time photographing the waves equally comprises his professional life. Between stints photographing in conAlict zones, Cervera has always taken to the sea as a way of understanding and coping with the stress and trauma of photographing armed conAlict. In 2008, Cervera witnessed the attack that killed his colleagues, Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros, in Libya. The trauma of their deaths, having just followed his mother’s passing, further connected him to surAing.

The quest for the perfect wave offers him healing and spiritual cleansing.


Anastasia Photo

143 Ludlow St New York, NY 10002

212.677.9725

kaley@anastasia-photo.com

Open Tues-Sun 11-7



Annette Kelm

April 7 - May 12

537 W 22nd St New York, NY +

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Annette Kelm

April 7 - May 12


Andrew Kreps Gallery

537 W 22nd St New York, NY 10011

212.741.8849

contact@andrewkreps.com

Open Tues-Sat 10-6

Summer Hours: Mon-Fri 10-6