LOCATIONS FILTERS

Jocelyn Lee: Jocelyn Lee | The Appearance of Things

June 16 - October 14

21 Winter Street Rockland, ME +

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Jocelyn Lee: Jocelyn Lee | The Appearance of Things

June 16 - October 14

The Appearance of Things attempts to access this tactile and optical experience and explores how we are enmeshed in an embodied and ephemeral world. All life, including our human form and being, passes through stages of birth, blossoming, and death.

Life occupies environments – it makes itself at home, and enacts an arc of existence on this stage, be it a pond, a forest, or a suburban home. Each image strives to celebrate a multitude of sensual bodies: animals, plants, and human beings. In many ways, the photographs are cabinets of wonder, echoing nineteenth century natural science’s fascination with the diversity of life.

The Appearance of Things represents nearly 10 years of work by Lee, and encompasses still life, portrait, and landscape photographs, as well as many images that fuse these genres. This mingling is partly what the work is about: creating a shift in perspective where a body (portrait) becomes a landscape; a still life becomes a portrait; and a landscape becomes a body.

Printed at large scale, the photographs beckon the viewer to a cinematic immersion in the image. The installation of the work as triptychs and diptychs juxtapose various bodies in divergent earthly environments and shift scale significantly across the images. The works are meant to engage the body of the viewer and become galaxies of their own through the use of space and the dilation and contraction of scale.

Jocelyn Lee was born in Naples, Italy and received her BA in philosophy and visual arts from Yale University, and her MFA in photography from Hunter College. In 2013 she received a NYFA Fellowship, and in 2001 she received a Guggenheim Fellowship. She is represented by Pace MacGill Gallery in New York and Flatland Gallery in Amsterdam.

Lee’s first monograph Nowhere but here was published by Steidl Publishers in December 2010 with a forward by Sharon Olds. In 1996 her work The Youngest Parents was published by DoubleTake Books and The Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University in collaboration with Robert Coles and John Moses.

Her works are in the collections of Maison Europeen de la Photographie, Paris, France; The Museum Folkwang, Essen, Germany; The Yale Museum of Art, New Haven, CT; The List Center at MIT, Cambridge, Mass.; The Portland Museum of Art; Portland, Maine; The Nelson Atkins Museum, Kansas City, MO.; The Colby College Museum of Art, Waterville, ME; The Haggerty Museum of Art, Milwaukee, Wisconsin; The Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, ME; The Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, NC.; The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, TX.; The Bates College Museum of Art. Lewiston, ME; and The Farnsworth Art Museum, Rockport, ME.; as well as numerous private collections.

Her work has appeared in many national and international publications including The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, New York Magazine, Photo Raw (Helsinki, Finland), Snoeks (Germany), Real Simple, MORE magazine, PDN, Allegra (The Netherlands), DoubleTake, the Hayden Review, Marie Claire (Taiwan), Harpers and others.

Lee taught photography at Princeton University from 2003-2012 and at The Maine College of Art from 1993-2001. She has been a visiting artist at Yale University, Bowdoin College, Mass College of Art, and New York University.

Image: Jenna and fallen apples, 2016


Press Release

Center for Maine Contemporary Art

21 Winter Street Rockland, ME 04841 USA

1207.7.01..5005

hello@cmcanow.org

Open Wed-Sat: 10-5

Summer Hours: Mon-Sat: 10-5; Sun:12-5 (Jun 1-Oct 31)


Laura Hunt: Motorcycle Covers

September 14 - October 20

321 Washington Ave, Brooklyn, NY, +

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Laura Hunt: Motorcycle Covers

September 14 - October 20

LAURA HUNT
MOTORCYCLE COVERS
SEPTEMBER 14-OCTOBER 20
OPENING RECEPTION:
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 6–9 PM
321 Gallery presents Motorcycle CoversLaura Hunt‘s first solo exhibition in Brooklyn.
In 2017, I started photographing motorcycle covers in Brooklyn and Manhattan. The undulating forms seemed to carry everything painting could. To rethink whether painting was necessary given the abundance of these forms, already out in public, I began using motorcycle covers as material. The covers are altered by hand-sewing, digital photography, and the addition of velvet, silk, and nylon. Some of the covers are stretched like paintings; most are installed loose.
Laura Hunt (b. 1985, Amsterdam, NL) is an artist who has lived in Atlanta, New Orleans, and New York. Her work has been exhibited in group shows at Team Gallery, Shimizu Brand, Eli Ping Gallery, The Emily Harvey Foundation, Essex Flowers, Dotory, and US Blues, (New York, NY); What Pipeline (Detroit, MI); Redling Fine Art (Los Angeles, CA); and Galerie im Regierungsviertel (Copenhagen, DK). In 2017, as part of the three-part exhibition “Billboard on Bowery,” Hunt‘s work occupied a billboard at the intersection of Canal and Bowery streets in New York City. Hunt has performed at White Columns, Small Editions, and Shoot the Lobster (New York, NY). She has also recently curated a series of two-person exhibitions for Paula Cooper Gallery (New York, NY).

321 Gallery

321 Washington Ave, Brooklyn, NY, 11205, USA

321@321GALLERY.ORG

Open Sat 12–5


Ben Depp: Bayou’s End

April 5 - September 27

241 Chartres St New Orleans, LA +

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Ben Depp: Bayou’s End

April 5 - September 27

Bayou’s End, A Gallery for Fine Photography’s exhibition of photographs by Ben Depp, captures the rapidly changing landscape of Southern Louisiana from the birds-eye perspective of a motor-powered paraglider piloted by the artist himself. The incredible risk required to make these photographs is not always apparent in the images themselves; Depp must navigate changing wind conditions and avoid obstacles while not dropping his camera or being dropped himself, often while flying mere feet above the water’s surface. Depp’s photographs function as both documentary and fine art, contributing meaningfully to the ongoing dialogue on Louisiana’s wetland loss while simultaneously transcending this context.


A Gallery for Fine Photography

241 Chartres St New Orleans, LA 70130

504.568.1313

joshuamann@att.net

Open Thur-Mon 10:30-5



Jerry Uelsmann: NOW

September 7 - September 30

241 Chartres St New Orleans, LA +

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Jerry Uelsmann: NOW

September 7 - September 30

20 hand made silver gelatin Photographs by Jerry Uelsmann.

Uelsmann uses up to 8 negatives and 8 enlargers to create his amazing images.

The photographs in this exhibit are all recently created 2015-2018.

 


A Gallery for Fine Photography

241 Chartres St New Orleans, LA 70130

504.568.1313

joshuamann@att.net

Open Thur-Mon 10:30-5



Contemplating the View: American Landscape Photographs

September 8, 2018 - March 3, 2019

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA +

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Contemplating the View: American Landscape Photographs

September 8, 2018 - March 3, 2019

This exhibition highlights one of the Addison collection’s great strengths–images of the American landscape, both natural and manmade. Whether historical or contemporary, fact or fiction, abstract or representative, celebratory or critical, private exploration or social document, all of the photographs assembled in this exhibition comment to one degree or another on the overlapping and often contesting powers of culture and nature. The complex dialogue these images foster prods us to consider the contrast between our myths and realities. Featuring works by photographers such as Carleton Watkins, Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Robert Adams, Lois Conner, Marcia Resnick, and Katherine Wolkoff, these photographs present more than mere description. As vehicles for artistic, personal, and cultural expression they challenge us to examine and reflect upon who we are.​


Addison Gallery of American Art

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA 01810

978.749.4015

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5

Summer Hours: Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5; closed Mondays, July 4, and the month of August


Jerry Birchfield: Asleep in the Dust

March 24 - September 23

One South High Akron, OH +

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Jerry Birchfield: Asleep in the Dust

March 24 - September 23

Photography has a weighty history as an art medium and as a tool to record our daily lives. We tend to seek value in what pictures are of rather than in physical photographic objects. The work of Jerry Birchfield examines this tendency to privilege images using photography, sculpture, drawing and text. Jerry Birchfield: Asleep in the Dust highlights the artist’s iterative process through which he creates works of art that blur boundaries between image, object, subject and meaning.

Birchfield applies layers of darkroom processes to achieve untraditional gelatin silver prints. Unlike most printed photographs, Birchfield’s are unique, as each sheet of paper retains traces of physical acts performed in the darkroom. Camera-based film negatives are enlarged onto light-sensitive paper that is partially obstructed by other materials (the technique used to make photograms). Chemicals then develop the latent image and further stretch contrast, tone and texture, sometimes introducing or erasing major compositional elements. In these highly constructed photographs, meaning emerges as much from the process of their production as from the recognizable imagery they contain.

Slivers of visible images reveal dusty, debris-laden surfaces that were in fact created to be photographed. Every aspect of Birchfield’s work emerges from the isolated space of his studio, where scraps, detritus and unfinished works often reappear in new iterations of ideas. In some cases, photographs become sculptures—by encasing prints in plaster, Birchfield masks their images and warps the paper. Viewers are confronted by the space that the photograph and the surrounding plaster occupy, which corresponds to the dimensions of a photograph in a standard frame.

Anchoring the exhibition, a raised platform in the center of the gallery references the importance of the act of framing for Birchfield. Its structure incorporates rectangular horizontal sections that are covered in glass, referencing common picture frames. Like amateur actors, sculptures that appear to mimic everyday objects are assembled on the stage. Some of these sculptures were created for past projects; others were made from fragments of cast-off materials—they have emerged from the dust of Birchfield’s studio.

—Elizabeth M. Carney, Assistant Curator, Akron Art Museum

Jerry Birchfield: Asleep in the Dust is organized by the Akron Art Museum with support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and the Ohio Arts Council.


Akron Art Museum

One South High Akron, OH 44308

330.376.9185

Open Wed-Sun 11-5, Thur 11-9


Depth of Field: Acquisitions to UMBC’s Photography Collections, 2008-2018

August 29 - December 19

1000 Hilltop Circle Baltimore, MD +

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Depth of Field: Acquisitions to UMBC’s Photography Collections, 2008-2018

August 29 - December 19

Depth of Field presents approximately one-hundred images acquired over the last ten years by UMBC’s Photography Collections through generous gifts from donors and artists. The photographs on view highlight the breadth and depth of the collection and illustrate the range of forms, technology, and artists that historically shaped the medium and are presently impacting its ongoing evolution. Featuring work by Albert Arthur Allen, Laurie Brown, Kristin Capp, Clarence Carvell, William Eggleston, Donna Ferrato, Robert Fichter, Todd Forsgren, Peggy Fox, Sally Gall, Ralph Gibson, Penny Harris, Sam Holden, Irina Ionesco, Walter Iooss, Lotte Jacobi, N. Jay Jaffee, Brian Jones, Nate Larson, David S. Lavine, Alen MacWeeney, Mary Ellen Mark, Fred McDarrah, Dorothy Norman, David Seltzer, David Seymour, Steve Szabo, Barbara Traub, Peter Turnley, and Robert VonSternberg.


Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

1000 Hilltop Circle Baltimore, MD 21250

410.455.2270

Open Mon-Fri 10-4:30, Thur 12-8, Sat-Sun 12-5


Diane Arbus: Diane Arbus: A box of ten photographs

April 6, 2018 - January 27, 2019

Eighth & F St NW Washington, DC +

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Diane Arbus: Diane Arbus: A box of ten photographs

April 6, 2018 - January 27, 2019

In late 1969, Diane Arbus began to work on a portfolio. At the time of her death in 1971, she had completed the printing for eight known sets of A box of ten photographs, of a planned edition of fifty, only four of which she sold during her lifetime. Two were purchased by photographer Richard Avedon; another by artist Jasper Johns. A fourth was purchased by Bea Feitler, art director at Harper’s Bazaar, for whom Arbus added an eleventh photograph.

This exhibition traces the history of A box of ten photographs between 1969 and 1973, using the set that Arbus assembled for Feitler, which was acquired by the Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) in 1986. The story is a crucial one because it was the portfolio that established the foundation for Arbus’s posthumous career, ushering in photography’s acceptance to the realm of “serious” art. After his encounter with Arbus and the portfolio, Philip Leider, then editor in chief of Artforum and a photography skeptic, admitted, “With Diane Arbus, one could find oneself interested in photography or not, but one could no longer. . . deny its status as art. . . . What changed everything was the portfolio itself.”

In May 1971, Arbus was the first photographer to be featured in Artforum, which also showcased her work on its cover. In June 1972, the portfolio was sent to Venice, where Arbus was the first photographer included in a Biennale, at that time the premiere international showcase for contemporary artists. SAAM organized the American contribution to the Biennale that year, thereby playing an important early role in Arbus’s legacy.


Smithsonian American Art Museum

Eighth & F St NW Washington, DC 20004

202.633.1000

Open daily 11:30-7



Trevor Paglen: Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen

June 21, 2018 - January 6, 2019

Eighth & F St NW Washington, DC +

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Trevor Paglen: Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen

June 21, 2018 - January 6, 2019

Trevor Paglen blurs the lines between art, science, and investigative journalism to construct unfamiliar and at times unsettling ways to see and interpret the world around us. Inspired by the landscape tradition, he captures the same horizon seen by American photographers Timothy O’Sullivan in the nineteenth century and Ansel Adams in the twentieth. Only in Paglen’s photographs is the infrastructure of surveillance also apparent—a classified military installation, a spy satellite, a tapped communications cable, a drone, an artificial intelligence (AI).

Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen is a mid-career survey, the first exhibition to present Paglen’s early photographic series alongside his recent sculptural objects and new work with AI. It carries on the long history of programs by the Smithsonian American Art Museum examining America’s changing relationship to the landscape. With this presentation, SAAM is contributing to the important and ongoing conversation about privacy and surveillance in contemporary society.

Paglen’s photographs show something we are not meant to see, whose concealment he regards as symptomatic of the historical moment we inhabit. His objects act in opposition to what his images have exposed, imagining another and potentially different world. Paglen is a conceptual artist with activist intentions. Helping to better see the particular moment we live in and producing spaces in which to envision alternative futures are among his chief concerns.

Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen is organized by John Jacob, SAAM’s McEvoy Family Curator for Photography, and is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue.


Smithsonian American Art Museum

Eighth & F St NW Washington, DC 20004

202.633.1000

Open daily 11:30-7



João Maria Gusmão, Pedro Paiva: WHERE THE SORCERER DOESN’T DARE TO STICK HIS NOSE and Another B&W Ghost Show

September 6 - October 20

537 W 22nd St New York, NY +

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João Maria Gusmão, Pedro Paiva: WHERE THE SORCERER DOESN’T DARE TO STICK HIS NOSE and Another B&W Ghost Show

September 6 - October 20


Andrew Kreps Gallery

537 W 22nd St New York, NY 10011

212.741.8849

contact@andrewkreps.com

Open Tues-Sat 10-6

Summer Hours: Mon-Fri 10-6


Catherine Wagner: Selections

September 5 - October 6

1275 Minnesota Street, San Francisco, CA, +

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Catherine Wagner: Selections

September 5 - October 6


Anglim Gilbert Gallery

1275 Minnesota Street, San Francisco, CA, United States

415.433.2710

gallery@anglimgilbertgallery.com

Open Tues-Sat 11-6



RaMell Ross: South Country, AL (A Hale Country)

June 12, 2018 - June 21, 2108

547 W 27th St, 4th floor, New York, NY +

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RaMell Ross: South Country, AL (A Hale Country)

June 12, 2018 - June 21, 2108

Aperture is pleased to present an exhibition of photographs of the work of photographer and filmmaker RaMell Ross, as featured in Aperture magazine #231, “Film & Foto“, dedicated to exploring the influence of photography on leading filmmakers, and the role of cinema in the work of artists and photographers.
Having lived, worked, and photographed in Hale County, Alabama, for almost ten years, RaMell Ross has produced a series of quietly powerful photographs—South County, AL (A Hale County)—that meditate on the myths of blackness in the American South. “To be black is the greatest fiction of my life,” Ross says. “Yet I’m still bound to its myth. I can’t help but think about the myth’s childhood and its backyard of the South. How the myth of blackness aged into fact and grew into laws. How it evolved from there to become tacit, and join the secret order of things. How it became the dark matter of the American imagination.”
Ross’s recent experimental documentary film extends his photographic practice. Hale County This Morning, This Evening (2018), which received a Sundance Film Festival Special Jury Award for Creative Vision, is composed of intimate and unencumbered moments of people in a community in Hale County, and offers an emotive impression of the Historic South. The film follows two young men: Daniel Collins attends college in search of opportunity, while Quincy Bryant becomes a father to an energetic son. Creating a poetic form that privileges the patiently observed interstices of their lives, Ross’s film trumpets the beauty of life and consequences of race, while simultaneously existing as a testament to dreaming, despite the odds.


Aperture Gallery & Bookstore

547 W 27th St, 4th floor, New York, NY 10001

212.505.5555

info@aperture.org

Open Mon-Sat 10-5:30