LOCATIONS FILTERS

Don McCullin

September 11 - November 16

41 E 57th St, Ste 1406, New York, NY +

+

Don McCullin

September 11 - November 16

NEW YORK— Sir Don McCullin is widely recognized as one of the world’s greatest photojournalists. Following his recent retrospective at Tate Britain, which received more than 170,000 visitors, forty photographs from McCullin’s six-decade career will be on view at Howard Greenberg Gallery from September 11 through November 16, 2019. This marks his first solo exhibition in New York since 2001, when The Lost Continent, his images of Africa, were presented at the United Nations headquarters.

 

McCullin’s iconic photographs from Vietnam, Northern Ireland, Syria, and many other sites of conflict are recognized for their brutal honesty, compassion, and their mastery of light and composition. His work in England opens a window into the impoverished lives of people in London’s East End and the industrial north; his contemplative landscapes near his home in Somerset offer a quieter, peaceful moment of repose amidst the human tragedies to which he has borne witness with his camera.

 

“Photography has given me a life,” McCullin has said. “The very least I could do was try and articulate these stories with as much compassion and clarity as they deserve, with as loud a voice as I could muster. Anything less would be mercenary.”

 

“I didn’t consider the danger,” he told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour in a 2016 interview, “but it’s in my blood. It’s what I’ve done for the last 60 years.”

 

About Don McCullin

Born in 1935, McCullin grew up in north London amidst the blight of the aftermath of the bombings of World War ll. At the age of fifteen, he left school and joined the Royal Air Force as a photographic assistant in Egypt, Cyprus, and Kenya, where he bought his first camera. Beginning in the 1960s, McCullin worked as a photographer documenting war and other human conflict in Africa, Asia, the Middle East and Northern Ireland, primarily for the Sunday Times Magazine. In the 1980s, McCullin began to capture other subjects, traveling to Indonesia, India, and Africa and returning with dramatic photo essays focused on remote places and peoples. Over the past three decades, he turned to the English landscape for more serene images, which are the subject of his most recent book, published in 2018. And, he has continued to document conflict in recent years, travelling to northern Iraq to photograph the Kurds’ struggle with ISIS, Syria, and Turkey in October 2015.

 

Among McCullin’s many honors are a 1961 British Press Award for his essay on the construction of the Berlin Wall, a World Press Photo of the Year award in 1964 for his coverage of the armed eruption of ethnic and nationalistic tension in Cyprus. In 1993 he was the first photojournalist to be awarded a CBE (Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire). McCullin was awarded the 2006 Cornell Capa Award by the International Center for Photography in New York for his lifetime contribution to the medium, and in 2017, he was awarded a knighthood by the Queen of England for his services to photography.

 

He is the author of more than a dozen books (mostly published by Jonathan Cape), including his autobiography Unreasonable Behaviour, 1990, updated and published again in 2015, and Don McCullin: The New Definitive Edition retrospective, published the same year. In 2010 he published Southern Frontiers, a record of the Roman Empire’s legacy in North Africa and the Middle East. McCullin’s work has been exhibited in numerous exhibitions including Tate Britain, Barbican Centre, Imperial War Museum, London; Maison Européenne de la Photographie, Paris; and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa. His work is held in museum collections around the world including Tate and Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

 

About Howard Greenberg Gallery

Since its inception over 35 years ago, Howard Greenberg Gallery has built a vast and ever-changing collection of some of the most important photographs in the medium. The Gallery’s collection acts as a living history of photography, offering genres and styles from Pictorialism to Modernism, in addition to contemporary photography and images conceived for industry, advertising, and fashion. Howard Greenberg Gallery is located at 41 East 57th Street, Suite 1406, New York. The gallery exhibits at The ADAA Art Show, The Armory Show, The Photography Show presented by AIPAD, Photo London, Art Basel, Paris Photo, and Art Basel Miami Beach. For more information, contact 212-334-0010 or info@howardgreenberg.com

or visit www.howardgreenberg.com.

 

###

Press Contact:

Nicole Straus Public Relations

Nicole Straus, 631-369-2188, 917-744-1040, nicole@nicolestrauspr.com

Margery Newman, 212-475-0252, MargeryNewman@aol.com


Press Release

Howard Greenberg Gallery

41 E 57th St, Ste 1406, New York, NY 10022

212.334.0010

info@howardgreenberg.com

Open Tues-Sat 10-6

Summer Hours: Mon-Fri 10-5



Richard Sexton: Enigmatic Stream

August 26, 2019 - January 4, 2020

241 Chartres St New Orleans, LA +

+

Richard Sexton: Enigmatic Stream

August 26, 2019 - January 4, 2020


A Gallery for Fine Photography

241 Chartres St New Orleans, LA 70130

504.568.1313

joshuamann@att.net

Open Thur-Mon 10:30-5



Joe Vitone: Joe Vitone: Family Records

April 27 - October 27

One South High Akron, OH +

+

Joe Vitone: Joe Vitone: Family Records

April 27 - October 27

Joe Vitone: Family Records is an ongoing series of portraits of photographer Joe Vitone’s relatives living in and around Akron, Ohio. Begun in 1998, this body of work documents evolving interpersonal connections between parents and children, siblings, spouses, cousins and other relations within working class communities of the Rust Belt region. Shot each summer when the artist—now based in Austin, Texas—travels back to Ohio, this series features scenes from festivities such as birthday parties and weddings as well as intimate portraits set outside homes and workplaces. Touched by celebrations and struggles including marriage, divorce, addiction, new homes, unemployment, new jobs and babies, the lives of Vitone’s relatives reflect experiences common to families across the United States.

Vitone prints his images, which he captures using 8 x 10-inch and 4 x 5-inch view cameras, in both black and white and color. Featuring 55 works photographed in Akron proper, as well as in surrounding communities including Barberton, Stow and Marshallville, Family Records marks the first time a selection from this series has been exhibited in Northeast Ohio.

Joe Vitone: Family Records is organized by the Akron Art Museum with support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, Ohio Arts Council and the Char and Chuck Fowler Family Foundation.


Akron Art Museum

One South High Akron, OH 44308

330.376.9185

Open Wed-Sun 11-5, Thur 11-9


Robert W. Fichter: Experimentalist: The Art of Robert W. Fichter

August 28 - December 18

Reception: Tue September 24, 5-8pm

1000 Hilltop Circle Baltimore, MD +

+

Robert W. Fichter: Experimentalist: The Art of Robert W. Fichter

August 28 - December 18

Reception: Tue September 24, 5-8pm

Experimentalist: The Art of Robert W. Fichter presents the first retrospective of the artist’s career in over thirty years. Drawn from his archive at UMBC, 55 works created between 1962 and 2006 highlight Fichter’s exploration of the human condition across photography, printmaking, and painting. Fichter employs shifting moods and mediums as well as wit, humor, and satire to deliver trenchant critiques of war, nuclear proliferation, and environmental disaster. Firmly rooting his expressive compositions in a strong sense of place—the surreal landscapes of his native Florida—Fichter presents a singular vision of humanity on the brink.


Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

1000 Hilltop Circle Baltimore, MD 21250

410.455.2270

Open Mon-Fri 10-4:30, Thur 12-8, Sat-Sun 12-5


Sara Cwynar: Gilded Age

June 9 - November 10

258 Main St Ridgefield, CT +

+

Sara Cwynar: Gilded Age

June 9 - November 10

The Aldrich presents the first East Coast exhibition of artist Sara Cwynar (b. 1985), whose practice spans photography, video, installation and bookmaking and surveys the transitory object-life of visual matter in our time of image infatuation. The exhibition features new and recent work by the artist. Using an accumulative archive of images and objects, culled from libraries, public archives, dollar stores, and eBay, Cwynar combines archival imagery and out-of-date objects with new digital technologies and archaic analogue processes to expose how images are produced, trafficked and mimed over time. Cwynar’s first museum publication, with an essay by Amy Smith-Stewart, the exhibition’s curator, accompanies the show.


Press Release

Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum

258 Main St Ridgefield, CT 06877

203.438.4519

Open Wed-Mon 12-5, Sat 10-5



Collier Schorr: Collier Schorr: Stonewall at 50

May 19 - September 30

2 Hylan Boulevard Staten Island, NY +

+

Collier Schorr: Collier Schorr: Stonewall at 50

May 19 - September 30

The Alice Austen House presents ‘Stonewall at 50’, an exhibition by artist Collier Schorr. 15 intergenerational portraits of LGBTQ+ activists and artists, celebrates the 50th Anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising. This project, generated by partnerships made in the Stonewall 50 Consortium, an organization committed to producing programming, exhibitions, and educational materials related to the Stonewall uprising and/or the history of the LGBTQ civil rights movement, brings together participants of the 1969 Stonewall Uprising with activists who have followed in their footsteps.

As part of the heady New York art world of the late ‘80s and early ‘90s, Collier Schorr’s early work mined the vernacular of postmodernism to create photographs that toe the line between documentary and fiction. Often using her subjects allegorically, Schorr’s work navigates the auspices of identity politics to ask beguiling questions about the nomenclature of selfhood. By introducing autobiographical referents and post-appropriation aesthetics into her practice, Schorr’s ongoing body of work negotiates the fluid nature of authorship and performance in relation to portraiture.

Produced by Paul Moakley and Victoria Munro

Funded by the  Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual ArtsRobert Mapplethorpe FoundationThe Shelley and Donald Rubin FoundationHumanities NYNew York Community TrustNew York City Department of Cultural Affairs and the National Endowment for the Arts


Alice Austen House Museum

2 Hylan Boulevard Staten Island, NY 10305

718.816.4506

Open Tues-Sun 11-5



Cornell Capa, Richard Avedon, Philip Trager, and others: Shutter Speed

July 30 - December 15

Oberlin College, 87 N Main St, Oberlin, Ohio +

+

Cornell Capa, Richard Avedon, Philip Trager, and others: Shutter Speed

July 30 - December 15

Comprising more than 60 works on paper from the AMAM collection, Shutter Speed explores the ability of photography to capture movement, particularly of the human body. The exhibition spans the history of photography, from the late 19th century to the end of the 20th, stretching from Eadweard Muybridge’s attempts to arrest motion with the camera shutter to Harold Edgerton’s experiments with the stroboscope, and on to Sarah Charlesworth’s appropriated images of falling subjects.

Not coincidentally, Shutter Speed also features many photographs of dancers and athletes, including recently acquired vernacular photographs from the Peter J. Cohen Collection. Conveying the elegance, physicality, fluidity, and velocity of the human body traversing space requires technical expertise and a deep sensitivity, both of which are in evidence in photographs by Cornell Capa, Richard Avedon, Philip Trager, and others. Together these images of movement attest to our fascination with the camera’s ability to catch “the moment,” in the words of André Kertész, “when something changes into something else.”

Organized by Ellen Johnson ’33 Assistant Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art Andrea Gyorody, with assistance from Amy Baylis ’20.


Allen Memorial Art Museum

Oberlin College, 87 N Main St, Oberlin, Ohio 44074

440.775.8665

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5



Richard Mosse

September 12 - November 2

49 Geary St San Francisco, CA +

+

Richard Mosse

September 12 - November 2


Altman Siegel Gallery

49 Geary St San Francisco, CA 94108

415.576.9300

Open Tues-Fri 10-6, Sat 11-5



David Levinthal: American Myth & Memory: David Levinthal Photographs

June 7 - October 14

Eighth & F St NW Washington, DC +

+

David Levinthal: American Myth & Memory: David Levinthal Photographs

June 7 - October 14

Populated with toy cowboys and cavalry, Barbie dolls and baseball players, David Levinthal’s photographs reference iconic images and events that shaped postwar American society. Despite their playful veneer, Levinthal’s images provide a lens through which to examine the myths and stereotypes lurking within our most beloved pastimes and enduring heroes. In doing so, Levinthal encourages us to consider the stories we tell about ourselves—what it means to be strong, beautiful, masculine, feminine, and ultimately, American.

American Myth & Memory: David Levinthal Photographs brings together six of the artist’s best-known bodies of work to explore some myths found in American popular culture and their place in our collective memory. Created between 1984 and 2018, the series Modern Romance, American Beauties, Wild West, Barbie, Baseball, and History all explore quintessentially American themes and imagery. The exhibition includes more than 70 color photographs drawn from two recent gifts to SAAM. The exhibition is organized by Joanna Marsh, SAAM’s Deputy Education Chair, Head of Interpretation and Audience Research.


Smithsonian American Art Museum

Eighth & F St NW Washington, DC 20004

202.633.1000

Open daily 11:30-7



Gordon Parks: Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940–1950

September 14 - December 29

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX +

+

Gordon Parks: Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940–1950

September 14 - December 29

Gordon Parks was part of what author Richard Wright called “the new tide” of African Americans who were pushing for respect and racial equality in the 1940s. Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, in collaboration with The Gordon Parks Foundation, Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940–1950 explores the early years of Parks’s career as an influential photographer who captured the essence of the civil rights movement in addition to breaking barriers for African Americans.

From his fashion photographs to his thoughtful depictions of American life, Parks used the camera as his tool for proclaiming the value of an American community built on freedom and equality. Through some 150 photographs, as well as rare magazines, newspapers, pamphlets, and books, Gordon Parks offers an expansive and intimate look at how this pioneering artist became one of the most influential photographers of his day.

Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940–1950 is organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, in collaboration with The Gordon Parks Foundation. Bank of America is proud to be the national sponsor of the exhibition. Generous support is also provided by the Kleinheinz Family Foundation for the Arts and Education and the Ann L. & Carol Green Rhodes Charitable Trust, Bank of America, N.A., Trustee.


Amon Carter Museum of American Art

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX 76107

817.738.1933

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Thur 10-8, Sun 12-5



Barbara Morgan, Camille Utterback, Ellen Carey: Set in Motion: Camille Utterback and Art That Moves

September 14 - December 8

Reception: Thurs October 3, 6-7:30pm

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX +

+

Barbara Morgan, Camille Utterback, Ellen Carey: Set in Motion: Camille Utterback and Art That Moves

September 14 - December 8

Reception: Thurs October 3, 6-7:30pm

This exhibition pairs an interactive installation by new-media artist Camille Utterback with a century of art depicting motion from the Carter’s collection. In Utterback’s Untitled 5 (2004), visitors’ movements in the gallery space are run through computer software written by the artist that translates them into an animated digital painting that constantly evolves. Although thoroughly contemporary, Untitled 5 builds on a rich lineage of artwork that records or transforms human movement, including the abstract expressionists Utterback considers her creative forbears. Set in Motion includes a selection of work by women who experimented to pursue this difficult goal, from well-known masters like Georgia O’Keeffe and Helen Frankenthaler to underappreciated artists like photographer Barbara Morgan and Anne Ryan.


Amon Carter Museum of American Art

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX 76107

817.738.1933

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Thur 10-8, Sun 12-5



Peter Bush: Peter Bush: MANA, 60 Years of All Blacks Photography

September 19 - November 30

143 Ludlow St New York, NY +

+

Peter Bush: Peter Bush: MANA, 60 Years of All Blacks Photography

September 19 - November 30

Anastasia Photo is pleased to announce two exhibitions of All Blacks rugby images by iconic New Zealand photographer Peter Bush CNZM, QSM. MANA is on view at Anastasia Photo in New York, September 19 – November 30, 2019. An additional exhibit in collaboration with Adidas will be on view in Adidas’ gallery space in Shibuya, Tokyo, October 22 – November 5, 2019.Drawing upon the Māori concept of mana, the exhibition surveys the All Blacks, New Zealand’s male rugby union team and the most successful international sporting team of all time, maintaining a 77%-win rate since their formation in 1903. The exhibition will include audio and video clips of the photographer addressing some of his favorite images in the exhibition, as well as his personal views of some of his most memorable rugby moments.In Māori culture, mana is honor. To have mana is to have great authority, presence or prestige. It is respect.Peter Bush photographed his first rugby union test match in 1949 for the New Zealand Herald.  Over the course of six decades, Bush photographed hundreds of matches both in New Zealand and overseas. No other photographer has had such privileged access to the All Blacks, matching their strides on and off the field. In the days before digital content was available to the world-at-large, Bush’s images were some of the first photographs seen by local fans of far-off matches.

Bush’s iconic photographs include those of All Black legends: Sir Colin Meads, Ian Kirkpatrick, Graham Mourie, Jonah Lomu and Dan Carter. His work also charts historic time periods and farcical weather conditions – from Apartheid South Africa and 1970s Northern Ireland, to the highly controversial 1981 Springboks tour of New Zealand and the infamous “Mud Men” match.

Bush captures the All Blacks’ tenacity, team dynamic and sheer athleticism that has led to their unprecedented dominance on the international field. He vividly demonstrates why the All Blacks are regarded as men of mana. And as the man who has spent a career photographing them, this is a mantle Bush too deserves.


Press Release

Anastasia Photo

143 Ludlow St New York, NY 10002

212.677.9725

kaley@anastasia-photo.com

Open Tues-Sat 10-6