LOCATIONS FILTERS

Antidote

September 11 - December 31

314 Forest Avenue, Portland, ME, USA +

+

Antidote

September 11 - December 31

MMPA Antidote

The Maine Museum of Photographic Arts’ gallery may be closed to the public during the COVID-19 pandemic but the work continues online. Our idea for the Antidote to the viral disruption happening is that we tout upbeat, positive and forward-looking posts that digitally feature the art and artists of Maine. 

Published bi-weekly, Antidote features contemporary photographers and interviews with industry experts. Please visit our web site to see the latest issue at www.mainemuseumofphotographicarts.org

For submissions please email contact.mmpa@gmail.com


Maine Museum of Photographic Arts

314 Forest Avenue, Portland, ME, USA

207.331.6622

contact.mmpa@gmail.com

Open Exhibitions online


Bruno V. Roels: Sensory Memory

June 25 - October 31

+

+

Bruno V. Roels: Sensory Memory

June 25 - October 31

Bruno V. Roels’ new edition for Gallery FIFTY ONE is called ‘Sensory Memory’.

The title refers to the memory process that allows individuals to retain impressions of sensory information after the original stimulus has ceased. The title is also a nod to the way the prints were made: the photographic paper was moved during exposure in the dark room, so instead of a photograph of one palm tree, the image becomes a multiple of that same image.

All prints in the edition are different and some have been touched with ink. This edition fits perfectly in Roels’ oeuvre: it touches on the nature of the analogue photographic process, playing with repetition and variation, while using his favorite imagery: palm trees.



Josephine Sacabo: Josephine Sacabo: Those Who Dance

October 8, 2020 - January 2, 2021

241 Chartres St New Orleans, LA +

+

Josephine Sacabo: Josephine Sacabo: Those Who Dance

October 8, 2020 - January 2, 2021

Virtual ZOOM Opening, October 8, 2020 at 7pm
Email: info@agallery.com to request an Invitation to the Zoom event.

www.agallery.com


Press Release

A Gallery for Fine Photography

241 Chartres St New Orleans, LA 70130

504.568.1313

joshuamann@att.net

Open Thur-Mon 10:30-5


Audre Lorde, Robert Alexander: Powerful and Dangerous: The Words and Images of Audre Lorde

March 22, 2020 - February 15, 2021

2 Hylan Boulevard Staten Island, NY +

+

Audre Lorde, Robert Alexander: Powerful and Dangerous: The Words and Images of Audre Lorde

March 22, 2020 - February 15, 2021

The Alice Austen House presents Audre Lorde in photographs and historic texts.

Powerful and Dangerous explores the intersection between language, activism and photographic messaging. The exhibition holds up a lens to the contemporary women’s, LGBTQ+, and Black Lives Matter movements and considers how Lorde’s words resonate today. Due to COVID-19 the exhibition has been extended with online programs until 2021. A series of public programs, including scholars talks, readings, outdoor film screenings and artist-led photo walks in the Staten Island neighborhood of Stapleton where Lorde’s home, now an LGBTQ Historic landmark, will take place through 2021.

This exhibition is curated by Victoria Munro with contributions by Clare Coss, Blanche Wiesen Cook, Jean Weisinger, Dagmar Shultz, Jennifer Abode and JEB. 

Scholars talks will include: Clare Coss, Blanche Wiesen Cook, Jewelle Gomez, Cheryl Clark, Elizabeth Lorde Rollins, M.D. and Alexis Pauline Gumbs.

Film presentations by Dagmar Schultz and Jennifer Abod with audio interview by Jennifer Abod.


Alice Austen House Museum

2 Hylan Boulevard Staten Island, NY 10305

718.816.4506

Open Tues--Fri 1:00 - 5:00 PM, Sat-Sun 11:00 - 5:00 Closed Monday


Acting Out: Cabinet Cards and the Making of Modern Photography

August 14 - November 1

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX +

+

Acting Out: Cabinet Cards and the Making of Modern Photography

August 14 - November 1

Acting Out: Cabinet Cards and the Making of Modern Photography offers the first-ever in-depth examination of the photographic phenomenon of cabinet cards. Cabinet cards were America’s main format for photographic portraiture through the last three decades of the nineteenth century. Inexpensive and sold by the dozen, they transformed getting one’s portrait made from a formal event taken up once or twice in a lifetime into a commonplace practice shared with family and friends.


Amon Carter Museum of American Art

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX 76107

817.738.1933

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Thur 10-8, Sun 12-5


Ervin A. Johnson: Variations On A Theme

September 18 - November 6

4600 Cascade Rd SW Atlanta, GA +

+

Ervin A. Johnson: Variations On A Theme

September 18 - November 6

Variations On A Theme is a nod to the technical influence of jazz within the series, but also how that genre reflects the life experiences of Black people. Our experiences as Americans are nuanced, riddled with complexity. Racism functions, in the same way, adapting to the times and hiding behind pillars of privilege. The Black spirit shifts too, renegotiating trauma into beauty and triumph; a call and response.

#InHonor exists as a visual reminder of the power of that transformation, and the inherent tenacity of the Black spirit. Guided by variations the work explores trauma in a very tangible way via the transformation of the portrait. Paint is introduced to the photographic material in a metaphoric way as a stand-in for physical and mental abuse done to Black bodies. Removing pigment and adding back from the photo on the first layer, in a not so accurate way becomes a commentary on the mishandling of the black body.


Arnika Dawkins Gallery

4600 Cascade Rd SW Atlanta, GA 30331

404.333.0312

info@adawkinsgallery.com

Open Wed-Fri 10-4



Group exhibition of photographic artists. Juror: Francis Thompson: Francis Thompson Selects

October 17 - November 28

75 Bennett Street Northwest, Atlanta, Georgia, +

+

Group exhibition of photographic artists. Juror: Francis Thompson: Francis Thompson Selects

October 17 - November 28

Atlanta Photography Group (APG) presents Francis Thompson Selects, APG’s feature exhibition for Atlanta Celebrates Photography (ACP), the month-long, citywide photography festival. The exhibition is juried by Francis Thompson, Art Program Project Manager at JLL, a contemporary corporate art collection installed within office buildings throughout North America.

Virtual opening & Juror talk will be available online 10/17/2020 -https://www.atlantaphotographygroup.org/events/2020/10/17/exhibition-francis-thompson-selects . Exhibition will be available online.

See website for more details and registration information.


Atlanta Photography Group

75 Bennett Street Northwest, Atlanta, Georgia, United States

404.605.0605

gallery@atlantaphotographygroup.org

Open Thurs-Sat 12-4, by appointment



Chris Anderson, Chuck Grove, Cyril Bailleul, David H. Miller, Dinesh Chitlangia, Douglas Powell, Eric Burkard, Eric Kunsman, Ferney Coy, Gail Mitchell, Gerald Alderman, Hannah Butler, Jari Poulin, Jeremy Janus, Jinwoo Hwon Lee, Karey Walter, Leslie Andrews, Manuel Morquecho, Marilyn Maxwell, Mark Caceres, Mary Farmer, Michael Joseph, Nathan Dean, Nina Cammarata, Rene Borrero, Shirley Nannini / Windflow Trish Lawrence: APG > ATL: Airport 2020

September 17 - November 11

75 Bennett Street Northwest, Atlanta, Georgia, +

+

Chris Anderson, Chuck Grove, Cyril Bailleul, David H. Miller, Dinesh Chitlangia, Douglas Powell, Eric Burkard, Eric Kunsman, Ferney Coy, Gail Mitchell, Gerald Alderman, Hannah Butler, Jari Poulin, Jeremy Janus, Jinwoo Hwon Lee, Karey Walter, Leslie Andrews, Manuel Morquecho, Marilyn Maxwell, Mark Caceres, Mary Farmer, Michael Joseph, Nathan Dean, Nina Cammarata, Rene Borrero, Shirley Nannini / Windflow Trish Lawrence: APG > ATL: Airport 2020

September 17 - November 11

Register for the Virtual Opening & Juror Talk with Amy Miller –  9/24 @7pm ET

https://www.atlantaphotographygroup.org/events/2020/9/17/exhibition-airport2020

.

Atlanta Photography Group presents APG > ATL: Airport 2020, a group show juried by Amy Miller, the Executive Director of Atlanta Celebrates Photography (ACP). This exhibition features multiple works by APG artists, one of Atlanta’s premier photography organizations. From a national call for entries, Miller selected 30 photographs for this exhibition currently on view at the world’s busiest airport. An annual highlight of the Atlanta Celebrates Photography Festival, the exhibition regularly welcomes 260,000 travelers a day to the city. If your plans bring you to the airport, be sure to stop by the main atrium of the domestic terminal for an oasis of calm among the traveling chaos this Fall.

All exhibition images are printed on Hahnemühle Photo Rag® Baryta Paper, courtesy of Hahnemühle.

Exhibition Dates: September 17, 2020 – November 11, 2020

The online opening is Sept 24, 2020 from 7pm to 9pm and includes a juror talk and Q&A with the attending artists. (Registration is required)

 

Location: Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, Main Atrium – Domestic Terminal, 6000 N Terminal Parkway, Atlanta, GA, 30320

This exhibition is free and open to the public during regular airport hours

Virtual Opening & Juror Talk with Amy Miller: Sept 24, 7-9pm

Please join us for a juror talk with the Executive Director of Atlanta Celebrates Photography, Amy Miller, where she will discuss her process for selecting the artists and their images for the exhibition, chat with the artists and take questions regarding the selections.

Website exhibition, opening event, juror talk & registration link: www.AtlantaPhotographyGroup.org


Atlanta Photography Group

75 Bennett Street Northwest, Atlanta, Georgia, United States

404.605.0605

gallery@atlantaphotographygroup.org

Open Thurs-Sat 12-4, by appointment



Dale Rio: Faces of Conservation: The Maasai Olympics

October 1 - October 31

3 W Homestead Ave, Collingswood, NJ, USA +

+

Dale Rio: Faces of Conservation: The Maasai Olympics

October 1 - October 31

Big Day Film Collective is happy to present photographer Dale Rio’s photographic works, Faces of Conservation: The Maasai Olympics.

Faces of Conservation: Maasai Olympics is an exhibition of Dale Rio’s portraits of Rangers and Olympic participants in Kenya, Africa as they establish a reformation of their ancestral right of passage the Maasai Olympics. The conservation group The Big Life Foundation has worked with local Kenyans to reform their ancestral practices to ones of animal conservation. Dale Rio’s analog photographs are beautiful portraits of  the participants and rangers in the Maasai Olympics as the competitive sport was reformed to revitalize the lion population and local ecosystem through The Big Life Foundation. Dale will be exhibiting her one of kind silver gelatin prints. Dale is a master darkroom print specialist, and her method includes shooting with analog film and hand printing on silver gelatin paper.

Faces of Conservation: The Maasai Olympics

In 2010, after growing increasingly concerned over the precipitous decline in local
lion populations, Maasai elders partnered with The Big Life organization in order to
create an alternative to lion killing as a rite of passage for young men. The result
was the Maasai Olympics, first held in 2012 and taking place every two years since.
In addition to individual awards for athletic performance, an award is presented to
the village that has had the most positive impact on the local ecosystem. As a result
of the Olympics, the lion population has rebounded from single digits to 200+.
The Big Life Foundation has also worked in collaboration with the Maasai to create
ways to minimize human – wildlife conflict, including compensation programs for
farmers and wildlife crossing points along roadways. These programs demonstrate
how wildlife conservation efforts can coexist alongside human interests and that
local people can (and should) play an integral role in shaping how their lands are
utilized, protected, and shared with native species. Through these programs, the
greater ecosystem – that of both wildlife and humans – in this part of Kenya has
been strengthened.
With human encroachment upon natural ecosystems on the increase, it is important
to see successful examples of communities striking a balance between human
existence and that of the natural world. This type of integration is key to preventing
future conflicts involving land ownership, poaching, resource access, and more.
In 2018, I traveled to Kenya to create portraits of the participants in the Maasai
Olympics, as well as rangers working for The Big Life Foundation. My goal was to
share images of people working on the front lines of conservation within their own
communities. From the elders who initiated collaboration to the youngsters who
participate in the Olympics to the rangers whose jobs are directly related to
conservation, all play an important role in an interconnected community of people
working to create a balance with the natural world, which is intrinsic to their way of
life.


Press Release

Big Day Film Collective

3 W Homestead Ave, Collingswood, NJ, USA

bigday@bigdayfilmcollective.com

Open Saturday & Sunday 12–6pm, Monday–Friday by appointment

Summer Hours: LIMITED until September due to Covid19 CDC restrictions. Please follow us on Instagram @bigdayfilmcollective for updates.



Erik Hoffner: Ice Visions

October 24, 2020 - March 6, 2021

10 Vernon St Brattleboro, VT +

+

Erik Hoffner: Ice Visions

October 24, 2020 - March 6, 2021

I’ve loved snowflakes since the day, as a child, I learned that no two are alike—millions and millions of them in a storm and no twins, every crystalline structure a unique expression of its own making. Erik Hoffner taught me a new lesson in the magic of nature: that thin sheets of freshly formed ice are without peer.

Hoffner is the Snowflake Bentley of our generation. His photographic creations capture patterns in the ice that forms overnight atop the holes bored by ice fishermen on the waterways of New England. Each rondel of new ice possesses its own internal, pictorial logic and materiality. Hoffner’s photographs open a viewing space to consider the dynamics of nature in its unlimited expressive and metaphoric potential.

— Mara Williams, Chief Curator

 

 

Ice Visions is an informal collaboration between myself, the ice fishing community, and elemental forces. When fishing holes refreeze overnight, they create fertile ground for nature’s wild artistic side, and these perfectly augered circles become worlds at once interstellar and cellular, dreamlike and tactile.

The images on display depict ice designs I’ve documented during 20 years of exploring New England lakes and ponds. In the morning light, with tiny bubbles from below fixed in place by several inches of new ice, these scenes come to life as eyes, galaxies, stars, cells, and more when rendered in black and white.

Due to milder than usual temperatures during the past winter, on many mornings I found barely a skin of new ice covering the prior day’s fishing holes. Bubbles pooled up at the surface before freezing, creating striking new kinds of formations I’d never seen before, ones that perhaps reveal the fingerprint of a warming climate.

— Erik Hoffner


Brattleboro Museum & Art Center

10 Vernon St Brattleboro, VT 05301

802.257.0124

info@brattleboromuseum.org

Open Wed-Mon 11-5



Federico Pardo: Ice Shanties: Fishing, People & Culture

October 24, 2020 - March 6, 2021

10 Vernon St Brattleboro, VT +

+

Federico Pardo: Ice Shanties: Fishing, People & Culture

October 24, 2020 - March 6, 2021

The ice shanty towns that spring up on Vermont’s frozen lakes and ponds are markers of the seasonal communities they harbor each winter. Practical and ingenious, shaped by function and aesthetics, ice shanties are a window into the personal, familial, and local cultures of ice fishing.

These simple yet intriguing structures captured the attention of Colombian-born photographer and part-time Vermont resident Federico Pardo, who in 2016 began documenting the shanties on a frozen floodplain of the West River in Brattleboro, known locally as the “The Meadows.”

Over the course of two winter seasons Pardo photographed the shanties using long-duration exposures, beginning his work after sunset and continuing long into the night. The resulting images, lit by both sunset and moonlight, carry a surreal quality of blended night and day.

Pardo’s photographs offer an atmospheric survey of the structures, the stark landscape from which they spring, and the human presence residing tentatively on an icy surface. His photographs tempt us to imagine otherworldly narratives about the shanties, their owners and the seemingly timeless space they inhabit.

Dreamlike and speculative, Pardo’s images are drawn down to earth by the voices of the shanty owners themselves—many of whom agreed to be interviewed by Vermont Folklife Center researchers for this exhibition. In these conversations the fishers speak of their shanties as structures, remark on the amenities and people they house, detail the practice of ice fishing, and, directly and indirectly, reflect the relationships, connections and community they reinvent each year at the Meadows.

Together, the images and voices give us a chance to connect with the material and human cultures of these ice fishing enclaves.

— The Vermont Folklife Center

 

The Vermont Folklife Center’s Vision & Voice Exhibition Program presents multimedia exhibits and programs that highlight the quiet miracles of everyday living. The Center’s work is grounded in collaborative ethnographic inquiry–spending time with people, interviewing them, and documenting their lives, with the goal of seeking to understand, as best we can, how they make sense of the world. Through its Vision & Voice Exhibition Program, VFC partners with individuals and communities across the state to share their perspectives, creating exhibits that aim to build mutual understanding, foster empathy, and cultivate a future where all Vermonters are valued.


Brattleboro Museum & Art Center

10 Vernon St Brattleboro, VT 05301

802.257.0124

info@brattleboromuseum.org

Open Wed-Mon 11-5



Rachel Portesi: Hair Portraits

October 24, 2020 - February 14, 2021

10 Vernon St Brattleboro, VT +

+

Rachel Portesi: Hair Portraits

October 24, 2020 - February 14, 2021

Since the beginning of human history, hair has held cultural and symbolic meaning. It is a marker of ethnicity, social class, identity, gender, sexuality, age, sickness, and health. Women’s hair especially is woven into mythology, religion, politics, culture, and art.

Rachel Portesi makes hair portraits utilizing the early photographic method of tintype. She works collaboratively with her models to create intricate—one might say baroque—hair styles. Pinned to walls or other scaffolding, the extravagant hair designs are often embellished with flowers, becoming living sculptures rooted in the human body. Hair is often referred to as a woman’s “crowning glory.” Portesi’s “crowns” befit Ceres/Demeter, goddess of growing plants and motherly relationships; and Diana/Artemis, goddess of the hunt, wild animals, and the moon.

Creating a tintype requires the subject, or model, to remain absolutely still for thirty seconds after the lens cap is removed and light floods onto the prepared wet plate. This wet process results in inconsistencies, with the deeply toned surface of each image retaining the traces of its distinctive making. Unlike digital photography, tintypes are singular objects, each print as unique as the portrait sitter.

— Mara Williams, Chief Curator

 

I reached a point in my life when all of the things I knew to be true—the entire structure, the scaffolding of my life—seemed to suddenly disappear. I was no longer the same person I was when I entered motherhood. With children who were growing up and needing less, the person I was before no longer seemed relevant. It was time to take a close look at myself from another perspective.

I began to look at the ways that loss, in many forms, is recognized. In Victorian culture, mourning became a craze. Mementos were often made using tresses of hair. Early photography played an important role through commemorative portraits to honor the dead. The custom of keeping a lock of a child’s hair, or saving our own shorn locks as a memento of our own past, is a remnant from the Victorian period.

I use hair both to honor and to say goodbye to past parts of myself. These images address fertility, sexuality, creativity, nurturing, harmony, and discord with nature. Above all, these images are a record of metamorphosis from a past fractured self to an integrated, self-confident woman.

— Rachel Portesi


Brattleboro Museum & Art Center

10 Vernon St Brattleboro, VT 05301

802.257.0124

info@brattleboromuseum.org

Open Wed-Mon 11-5