LOCATIONS FILTERS

William Garnett, Brett Weston, Paul Caponigro, Edmund Teske, Imogen Cunningham, Ruth Bernhard, Cara Weston, Vilem Kriz, Mona Kuhn, Minor White, Ansel Adams, Ernie Luppi, Ron Moultrie Saunders, Rolfe Horn, Philip Sager, and others.: Abstractions, A-Z

October 25 - December 1

Reception: Thurs November 1, 5:30-7:30pm

49 Geary St, 4th floor, San Francisco, CA +

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William Garnett, Brett Weston, Paul Caponigro, Edmund Teske, Imogen Cunningham, Ruth Bernhard, Cara Weston, Vilem Kriz, Mona Kuhn, Minor White, Ansel Adams, Ernie Luppi, Ron Moultrie Saunders, Rolfe Horn, Philip Sager, and others.: Abstractions, A-Z

October 25 - December 1

Reception: Thurs November 1, 5:30-7:30pm

Abstractions, A-Z, will feature contemporary and historical photographs of abstract photography from the gallery’s archive as well as numerous California photographers. Look for wonderful images of details, patterns, shapes and forms that aren’t instantly recognizable and do make you see things anew. Featuring works by aerial photographer William Garnett, classic images of genre by Brett Weston, Paul Caponigro, Edmund Teske, Imogen Cunningham, Ruth Bernhard, Cara Weston, Vilem Kriz, Mona Kuhn and Minor White, as well as rarely seen pictures by Ansel Adams and contemporary Bay Area photographers Rolfe Horn, Philip Sager, and others.


Scott Nichols Gallery

49 Geary St, 4th floor, San Francisco, CA 94108

415.788.4641

info@scottnicholsgallery.com

Open Tues-Sat 11-5:30



Josephine Sacabo: TAGGED

October 4, 2018 - January 12, 2019

241 Chartres St New Orleans, LA +

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Josephine Sacabo: TAGGED

October 4, 2018 - January 12, 2019

Walking the graffiti gauntlet from my house to my studio, I am confronted by a lexicon of rampant misogyny, violence and sexual insults. The messages may be verbal but their effects are visceral. We are being ‘tagged’- as hos, bitches, and worse. But I am not that woman.

Why have women become the targets of the rage and frustration expressed? Why are women bearing the consequences for injustices they have not committed? Where are the graffiti messages by women meant for men?

I do not have the answers to these questions, all I have are these images of what it feels like to be a woman walking these streets. And in this I know I am not alone.   – Josephine Sacabo


A Gallery for Fine Photography

241 Chartres St New Orleans, LA 70130

504.568.1313

joshuamann@att.net

Open Thur-Mon 10:30-5


Contemplating the View: American Landscape Photographs

September 8, 2018 - March 3, 2019

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA +

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Contemplating the View: American Landscape Photographs

September 8, 2018 - March 3, 2019

This exhibition highlights one of the Addison collection’s great strengths–images of the American landscape, both natural and manmade. Whether historical or contemporary, fact or fiction, abstract or representative, celebratory or critical, private exploration or social document, all of the photographs assembled in this exhibition comment to one degree or another on the overlapping and often contesting powers of culture and nature. The complex dialogue these images foster prods us to consider the contrast between our myths and realities. Featuring works by photographers such as Carleton Watkins, Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Robert Adams, Lois Conner, Marcia Resnick, and Katherine Wolkoff, these photographs present more than mere description. As vehicles for artistic, personal, and cultural expression they challenge us to examine and reflect upon who we are.​


Addison Gallery of American Art

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA 01810

978.749.4015

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5

Summer Hours: Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5; closed Mondays, July 4, and the month of August


Depth of Field: Acquisitions to UMBC’s Photography Collections, 2008-2018

August 29 - December 19

1000 Hilltop Circle Baltimore, MD +

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Depth of Field: Acquisitions to UMBC’s Photography Collections, 2008-2018

August 29 - December 19

Depth of Field presents approximately one-hundred images acquired over the last ten years by UMBC’s Photography Collections through generous gifts from donors and artists. The photographs on view highlight the breadth and depth of the collection and illustrate the range of forms, technology, and artists that historically shaped the medium and are presently impacting its ongoing evolution. Featuring work by Albert Arthur Allen, Laurie Brown, Kristin Capp, Clarence Carvell, William Eggleston, Donna Ferrato, Robert Fichter, Todd Forsgren, Peggy Fox, Sally Gall, Ralph Gibson, Penny Harris, Sam Holden, Irina Ionesco, Walter Iooss, Lotte Jacobi, N. Jay Jaffee, Brian Jones, Nate Larson, David S. Lavine, Alen MacWeeney, Mary Ellen Mark, Fred McDarrah, Dorothy Norman, David Seltzer, David Seymour, Steve Szabo, Barbara Traub, Peter Turnley, and Robert VonSternberg.


Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

1000 Hilltop Circle Baltimore, MD 21250

410.455.2270

Open Mon-Fri 10-4:30, Thur 12-8, Sat-Sun 12-5


Dmitri Baltermants, Mark Markov-Grinberg: The Soviet Lens

September 9, 2018 - January 6, 2019

31 N 5th St Allentown, PA +

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Dmitri Baltermants, Mark Markov-Grinberg: The Soviet Lens

September 9, 2018 - January 6, 2019


Allentown Art Museum

31 N 5th St Allentown, PA 18101

610.432.4333

Open Wed-Sat 11-4, Thur 11-8, Sun 12-4


Diane Arbus: Diane Arbus: A box of ten photographs

April 6, 2018 - January 27, 2019

Eighth & F St NW Washington, DC +

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Diane Arbus: Diane Arbus: A box of ten photographs

April 6, 2018 - January 27, 2019

In late 1969, Diane Arbus began to work on a portfolio. At the time of her death in 1971, she had completed the printing for eight known sets of A box of ten photographs, of a planned edition of fifty, only four of which she sold during her lifetime. Two were purchased by photographer Richard Avedon; another by artist Jasper Johns. A fourth was purchased by Bea Feitler, art director at Harper’s Bazaar, for whom Arbus added an eleventh photograph.

This exhibition traces the history of A box of ten photographs between 1969 and 1973, using the set that Arbus assembled for Feitler, which was acquired by the Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) in 1986. The story is a crucial one because it was the portfolio that established the foundation for Arbus’s posthumous career, ushering in photography’s acceptance to the realm of “serious” art. After his encounter with Arbus and the portfolio, Philip Leider, then editor in chief of Artforum and a photography skeptic, admitted, “With Diane Arbus, one could find oneself interested in photography or not, but one could no longer. . . deny its status as art. . . . What changed everything was the portfolio itself.”

In May 1971, Arbus was the first photographer to be featured in Artforum, which also showcased her work on its cover. In June 1972, the portfolio was sent to Venice, where Arbus was the first photographer included in a Biennale, at that time the premiere international showcase for contemporary artists. SAAM organized the American contribution to the Biennale that year, thereby playing an important early role in Arbus’s legacy.


Smithsonian American Art Museum

Eighth & F St NW Washington, DC 20004

202.633.1000

Open daily 11:30-7



Trevor Paglen: Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen

June 21, 2018 - January 6, 2019

Eighth & F St NW Washington, DC +

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Trevor Paglen: Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen

June 21, 2018 - January 6, 2019

Trevor Paglen blurs the lines between art, science, and investigative journalism to construct unfamiliar and at times unsettling ways to see and interpret the world around us. Inspired by the landscape tradition, he captures the same horizon seen by American photographers Timothy O’Sullivan in the nineteenth century and Ansel Adams in the twentieth. Only in Paglen’s photographs is the infrastructure of surveillance also apparent—a classified military installation, a spy satellite, a tapped communications cable, a drone, an artificial intelligence (AI).

Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen is a mid-career survey, the first exhibition to present Paglen’s early photographic series alongside his recent sculptural objects and new work with AI. It carries on the long history of programs by the Smithsonian American Art Museum examining America’s changing relationship to the landscape. With this presentation, SAAM is contributing to the important and ongoing conversation about privacy and surveillance in contemporary society.

Paglen’s photographs show something we are not meant to see, whose concealment he regards as symptomatic of the historical moment we inhabit. His objects act in opposition to what his images have exposed, imagining another and potentially different world. Paglen is a conceptual artist with activist intentions. Helping to better see the particular moment we live in and producing spaces in which to envision alternative futures are among his chief concerns.

Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen is organized by John Jacob, SAAM’s McEvoy Family Curator for Photography, and is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue.


Smithsonian American Art Museum

Eighth & F St NW Washington, DC 20004

202.633.1000

Open daily 11:30-7



RaMell Ross: South Country, AL (A Hale Country)

June 12, 2018 - June 21, 2108

547 W 27th St, 4th floor, New York, NY +

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RaMell Ross: South Country, AL (A Hale Country)

June 12, 2018 - June 21, 2108

Aperture is pleased to present an exhibition of photographs of the work of photographer and filmmaker RaMell Ross, as featured in Aperture magazine #231, “Film & Foto“, dedicated to exploring the influence of photography on leading filmmakers, and the role of cinema in the work of artists and photographers.
Having lived, worked, and photographed in Hale County, Alabama, for almost ten years, RaMell Ross has produced a series of quietly powerful photographs—South County, AL (A Hale County)—that meditate on the myths of blackness in the American South. “To be black is the greatest fiction of my life,” Ross says. “Yet I’m still bound to its myth. I can’t help but think about the myth’s childhood and its backyard of the South. How the myth of blackness aged into fact and grew into laws. How it evolved from there to become tacit, and join the secret order of things. How it became the dark matter of the American imagination.”
Ross’s recent experimental documentary film extends his photographic practice. Hale County This Morning, This Evening (2018), which received a Sundance Film Festival Special Jury Award for Creative Vision, is composed of intimate and unencumbered moments of people in a community in Hale County, and offers an emotive impression of the Historic South. The film follows two young men: Daniel Collins attends college in search of opportunity, while Quincy Bryant becomes a father to an energetic son. Creating a poetic form that privileges the patiently observed interstices of their lives, Ross’s film trumpets the beauty of life and consequences of race, while simultaneously existing as a testament to dreaming, despite the odds.


Aperture Gallery & Bookstore

547 W 27th St, 4th floor, New York, NY 10001

212.505.5555

info@aperture.org

Open Mon-Sat 10-5:30



The New Vanguard Photography Prize

October 17 - October 23

547 W 27th St, 4th floor, New York, NY +

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The New Vanguard Photography Prize

October 17 - October 23

Aperture and Document Journal, in partnership with Calvin Klein, are pleased to present The New Vanguard Photography Prize, spotlighting image makers on the front lines of art and fashion, with support from Ford Models, and powered by Swipecast.

Open to applications from all around the world, The New Vanguard Photography Prize sought unrepresented talents of all ages and backgrounds, with a focus on discovering new and visionary photographers across fashion and the fine arts. From those submissions, a jury selected a shortlist of 25 artists, which then was narrowed to five finalists who went on to create a series of exclusive photos for Document Journal. The exhibition will feature work from the 25 shortlisted artists, with the winner and recipient of a special cover of the Fall/Winter 2018 edition of Document Journal will be revealed at the opening reception.

Exhibited Artists

Igor Pjorrt / Juan C. Rodriguez & Carmen Triana / Quil Lemons / Steph Wilson / Luis Alberto Rodriguez / Bennie Julian Gay / Andreas Laszlo Konrath / Vasily Agrenenko / Marcus Schaefer / Mr. iozo / Markn Ogue / Lucie Khahoutian / Max Cornwall / Kristin-Lee Moolman / Jan Philipzen / Amanda Fordyce / Kirralea Birch / Javarius Jones / Suzie Howell / Ward Roberts / Etienne Saint-Denis / Brian Kanagaki / Andras Ladocsi / Alex Lockett


Aperture Gallery & Bookstore

547 W 27th St, 4th floor, New York, NY 10001

212.505.5555

info@aperture.org

Open Mon-Sat 10-5:30



City as Ecosystem: NYC Urban Field Station Artists Residency

September 13 - November 23

830 Fifth Ave New York, NY +

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City as Ecosystem: NYC Urban Field Station Artists Residency

September 13 - November 23


Arsenal Gallery

830 Fifth Ave New York, NY 10065

212.360.8163

Open Mon-Fri 9-5


Never a Lovely So Real: Photography and Film in Chicago, 1950–1980

May 12 - October 28

111 S Michigan Ave Chicago, IL +

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Never a Lovely So Real: Photography and Film in Chicago, 1950–1980

May 12 - October 28

In his 1951 book Chicago: City on the Make, Nelson Algren offered bittersweet praise for the city: “Once you’ve become a part of this particular patch, you’ll never love another. Like loving a woman with a broken nose, you may well find lovelier lovelies. But never a lovely so real.” This unique character—fraught with affection, tension, and contradiction—is revealed in the work of the many photographers who documented Chicago in the second half of the 20th century as cultural, social, political, and economic events transformed the city. Photographers and filmmakers, perhaps more so than any other artists, focused on Chicago’s history as a city of neighborhoods, many of them fiercely segregated and separated from one another. Together they constructed a portrait of Chicago that speaks equally to its allure and its haunting brutality.

Drawn largely from the Art Institute’s collection, this exhibition provides a poetic, rather than exhaustive, survey of photographers and filmmakers who worked across the city from the 1950s through the 1970s. These individuals are drawn together by their commentary in images and film on the life of their own communities or communities to which they were granted intimate access as outsiders. Featured among these is a network of photographers who created rich documents of Chicago’s South Side neighborhoods during a period coinciding with the emergence of the city’s Black Arts Movement. These include works by Billy Abernathy, Darryl Cowherd, Bob Crawford, Roy Lewis, and Robert A. Sengstacke produced in connection with the Wall of Respect(1967–71), a revolutionary outdoor mural located in the Bronzeville neighborhood that celebrated Black Liberation Movements. Other projects, such as Mikki Ferrill’s decade-long documentation of an improvised South Side club, The Garage (1970/80), and two of Gordon Parks’s Life magazine assignments, likewise underscore the role played by Chicago’s South Side as a national center of black culture and politics.

These projects are complemented by work created in Chicago’s north and west sides in neighborhoods that were undergoing significant transformations. Danny Lyon’s 1965 series Uptown captured both the struggle and immense pride of residents living in an area where immigrants from central Appalachia had recently settled. In a similar manner, Luis Medina gained the trust of members of several Hispanic street gangs while photographing their territorial graffiti in the turf surrounding Wrigley Field in the late 1970s. This rich history of street photography is shown alongside the work of filmmakers such as Tom Palazzolo and Kartemquin Films, who poetically captured the city’s changing landscape.

Representing incredibly diverse personal and public narratives about Chicago—most created outside of the city’s dominant art communities—these works, seen together, reveal Chicago’s character, lovely and ever so real.


Art Institute of Chicago

111 S Michigan Ave Chicago, IL 60603

312.443.3600

Open daily 10:30-5, Thur 10:30-8



Japan Modern: Photography from the Gloria Katz and Willard Huyck Collection

September 29, 2018 - January 21, 2019

1050 Independence Ave SW Washington, DC +

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Japan Modern: Photography from the Gloria Katz and Willard Huyck Collection

September 29, 2018 - January 21, 2019

Celebrating the Freer|Sackler’s recent acquisition of a major Japanese photography collection, this exhibition features a selection of works by groundbreaking twentieth-century photographers. Whether capturing evocative landscapes or the gritty realities of postwar Japan, this presentation focuses on Japanese artists’ search for a sense of place in a rapidly changing country. The images highlight destinations both rural and urban, in styles ranging from powerful social documentary to intensely personal. A selection of photobooks and experimental films adds to this multifaceted exploration. Complemented by Japan Modern: Prints in the Age of Photography


Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

1050 Independence Ave SW Washington, DC 20004

202.633.1000

Open daily 10-5:30