LOCATIONS FILTERS

Erik Madigan Heck

March 14 - June 1

100 Crosby St, New York, NY, +

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Erik Madigan Heck

March 14 - June 1


Press Release

Staley-Wise Gallery

100 Crosby St, New York, NY, United States

212.966.6223

photo@staleywise.com

Open Tues-Sat 11-5

Summer Hours: Mon-Fri 11-5



Horst P. Horst: ALWAYS IN STYLE: HORST P. HORST

May 3 - June 22

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Horst P. Horst: ALWAYS IN STYLE: HORST P. HORST

May 3 - June 22

10 Corso Como Gallery and Fondazione Sozzani present Always in Style by pioneering fashion photographer Horst P. Horst on view from May 3 – June 22, 2019. Featuring more than 25 photographs from the Horst Estate, Always in Style celebrates a master of the medium and brings together a timeless body of work.




Helmut Newton, Jacques Henri Lartigue, Bert Stern, Robert Mapplethorpe, Thomas Struth, Malick Sidibé, Lucien Clergue, Steven Klein, Yamamoto Masao, Irving Penn, Bruno V. Roels, Katrien De Blauwer, Willy Ronis, Sante d'Orazio, Tom Butler, Frank Horvat, André Kertész: About Love

February 14, 2019 - February 14, 2020

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Helmut Newton, Jacques Henri Lartigue, Bert Stern, Robert Mapplethorpe, Thomas Struth, Malick Sidibé, Lucien Clergue, Steven Klein, Yamamoto Masao, Irving Penn, Bruno V. Roels, Katrien De Blauwer, Willy Ronis, Sante d'Orazio, Tom Butler, Frank Horvat, André Kertész: About Love

February 14, 2019 - February 14, 2020

About Love features excellent photographs from masters of the medium such as Robert Mapplethorpe, Irving Penn, Helmut Newton, Malick Sidibé and many others. If collecting is your passion, About Love is an unmissable source of inspiration. Here you will find elegant nudes, ardent still lives and the most sought after prints ranging from 500 € to 35.000 €.

Visit this online exhibition at www.28vignonstreet.com!




Gil Rigoulet: Deaf Love

May 16, 2019 - May 16, 2020

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Gil Rigoulet: Deaf Love

May 16, 2019 - May 16, 2020

Online Exhibition DEAF LOVE by GIL RIGOULET on 28 Vignon Street

“But soon there will be nothing left. Traces of lipstick on a glass remind us that only a few moments before, bodies were intertwined, each lusting for the other. Only objects remain. Now left to their own demise. Vases, glasses, full of words and clues and gasps and sighs from vanished passions.
Objects placed in a particular order. An order that echoes that of a world of a man: the man behind the camera. Actor, voyeur, operator, storyteller, conveyer. He whispers and suddenly we hear the murmur between the lovers. Each in solitude. Never quite together. Joined, somewhere, elsewhere.
The woman proudly flaunts herself, provocative and domineering, whilst the man shies away. Beneath the sheets he attempts to hide from himself. Tired of seeing, tired of her yearning, he shuts his eyes. Who will see in his place now? The photographer? The shadow that appears and disappears at the pace of his visions? For the eye never dies. Always in dire straits, looking for a sign, a feeling, an answer.
Suddenly we find ourselves faced with the anathema of the artist, with the complexity of being a single being and the eternal dilemma: forgetting oneself versus renouncing the work.
We return to reality. The bodies have left. The fever has passed. It disseminated all but the images, frozen for an artificial eternity. Man and woman now stand as two survivors. The night can no longer hold them back. Like vampires, they flee the coming dawn. Photography is the only trace of them ever existing. Light is all. Let there be light!
And light appears.
The chamber is now empty. The bodies have dissolved into the waters from which they originated, pure matter again. They are far gone now. Photography shall not suffice.” – Selma Bella Zarhloul (Curator)

On Gil Rigoulet
Gil Rigoulet becomes in 1984 the first photographer to work with the newspaper Le Monde with which he collaborates for over 20 years. He achieves side by side with Henri Cartier-Bresson a supplement called “Portrait of a news paper; le Monde”.  In 1986, Robert Doisneau presents Gil’s pictures in a portfolio of Photo-Magazine and Christian Caujolle (Chief Picture Editor of the French newspaper Liberation) show his pictures for the exhibition Life in a Swimming Suit at the Deligny swimming pool next to Jospeh Koudelka, Marc Riboud, William Klein, Helmut Newton, Jean Loup Sieff, Jacques Henri Lartigue…
He collaborates, during his press career, with numerous national and international magazines such as Geo, Grands Reportages, Elle, Figaro magazine, The Sunday Times, La Republica, la Stampa, El Pais. He continues his work for the press until 2007.
“I was passionate about photos, making a living shooting pictures brought me a sense of balance. But the photos I took for a newspaper weren’t necessarily the topics I was most interested in. So I took time off and travelled to fulfill my own calling. No obligations, no command, just to see the world around me. I wanted to immerse myself in this society and convey my feelings to understand what was frozen and what changed. I went into the details of situations, grasped what sometimes escapes us. We must love human nature to devote so much time and it takes time to understand these lives, these ways of transcending the ordinary, these absurd situations, but also this joy of living and this revolt. My pictures were the street.”
In the 80s, he chooses to focus on this personal photographic research too and 35 years later, he is still seeking those subjects. He kept those series private and only started to show them recently: Bodies & Water, On the Road and Intimacy.
“This last series shows the intimacy of the places where I lived, glasses, carafes, clothes and women. I made these polaroid images, but I did not fix the positives, I let them deteriorate over time; mimicry with memory that dilutes in time.”




Timothy Duff: Super Spirit

May 1 - July 17

241 Chartres St New Orleans, LA +

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Timothy Duff: Super Spirit

May 1 - July 17


A Gallery for Fine Photography

241 Chartres St New Orleans, LA 70130

504.568.1313

joshuamann@att.net

Open Thur-Mon 10:30-5



Harlem: In Situ

March 30 - July 31

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA +

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Harlem: In Situ

March 30 - July 31

​​Harlem is as much a place as a myth. Throughout the 20th century, this northern Manhattan neighborhood has been written into history as many things; however, in this context, Harlem is ultimately and unceasingly, a black creative mecca, a place whose rich social and cultural fabric has been woven out of the abundance of people of African descent worldwide who have come together in its streets, salons, parks, restaurants, and clubs, influencing generations of artists, musicians, and writers. Harlem: In Situ explores the depth and complexity of this renowned neighborhood, highlighting the work of some of the most important visual artists working from the late 1920s through today. Initially inspired by the Addison’s trove of Harlem street-photography, which includes significant bodies of work such as Harlem Document (1935) by Aaron Siskind, Harlem Heroes (1930–1960) by Carl van Vechten, Harlem, USA (1975–1979) by Dawoud Bey (a three-time Elson Artist-in-Residence at Phillips Academy), 1920s–1950s (Harlem) by Lucien Aigner, and The Sweet Flypaper of Life (1984) by Roy DeCarava, this show also includes prints from the collection by Romare Bearden, Elizabeth Catlett, James Lesesne Wells, and Vincent D. Smith, as well as several key works by nearly a dozen artists, working across time and media, including Charles Alton, Jordan Casteel, Aaron Douglas, Miatta Kawinzi, Alice Neel, Lorraine O’Grady, and Kehinde Wiley, that will come to the Addison as loans from sister institutions. These artists and their works investigate the legacy and trajectory of Harlem, which encompasses mass migration, opulence, cultural renaissance, depression, demise, empowerment, pride, and gentrification.


Press Release

Addison Gallery of American Art

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA 01810

978.749.4015

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5

Summer Hours: Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5; closed Mondays, July 4, and the month of August



John Goodman: John Goodman: not recent color

April 13 - July 31

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA +

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John Goodman: John Goodman: not recent color

April 13 - July 31

Comprised of brilliant color photographs, the majority of which have never before been exhibited, John Goodman: not recent color examines the American cultural landscape through the coming of age of a young artist in the 1970s and 1980s.

Made from recently rediscovered Kodachrome and Ektachrome slides, these photographs transport viewers to another time with their richly saturated colors and cinematic views. Piercing yet tender images shot in diners, bowling alleys, and darkened theaters, outside phone booths and gas stations, and on city streets and sidewalks conjure moments in individual lives and social interactions that together tell a story about the slowly changing social fabric of Goodman’s studio neighborhood in Boston––and the country at large.

Predating the work for which Goodman is best known—poignant and gritty photographs capturing subjects such as Boston’s famed Combat Zone, backstage at the Boston Ballet, the streets of Havana, and a Times Square boxing gym—these early works announce a lifelong interest in recording fleeting moments, as well as the more abstract and enduring essence of places and people. ​​​​


Press Release

Addison Gallery of American Art

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA 01810

978.749.4015

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5

Summer Hours: Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5; closed Mondays, July 4, and the month of August



Dmitry Markov: #DRAFT #RUSSIA

April 6 - June 4

50 Howard St New York, NY +

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Dmitry Markov: #DRAFT #RUSSIA

April 6 - June 4


agnès b. Galerie Boutique

50 Howard St New York, NY 10013

212.431.1335

Open Mon-Sat 11-7, Sun 12-6


Joe Vitone: Joe Vitone: Family Records

April 27 - October 27

One South High Akron, OH +

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Joe Vitone: Joe Vitone: Family Records

April 27 - October 27

Joe Vitone: Family Records is an ongoing series of portraits of photographer Joe Vitone’s relatives living in and around Akron, Ohio. Begun in 1998, this body of work documents evolving interpersonal connections between parents and children, siblings, spouses, cousins and other relations within working class communities of the Rust Belt region. Shot each summer when the artist—now based in Austin, Texas—travels back to Ohio, this series features scenes from festivities such as birthday parties and weddings as well as intimate portraits set outside homes and workplaces. Touched by celebrations and struggles including marriage, divorce, addiction, new homes, unemployment, new jobs and babies, the lives of Vitone’s relatives reflect experiences common to families across the United States.

Vitone prints his images, which he captures using 8 x 10-inch and 4 x 5-inch view cameras, in both black and white and color. Featuring 55 works photographed in Akron proper, as well as in surrounding communities including Barberton, Stow and Marshallville, Family Records marks the first time a selection from this series has been exhibited in Northeast Ohio.

Joe Vitone: Family Records is organized by the Akron Art Museum with support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, Ohio Arts Council and the Char and Chuck Fowler Family Foundation.


Akron Art Museum

One South High Akron, OH 44308

330.376.9185

Open Wed-Sun 11-5, Thur 11-9


Collier Schorr: Collier Schorr: Stonewall at 50

May 19 - September 30

2 Hylan Boulevard Staten Island, NY +

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Collier Schorr: Collier Schorr: Stonewall at 50

May 19 - September 30

The Alice Austen House presents ‘Stonewall at 50’, an exhibition by artist Collier Schorr. 15 intergenerational portraits of LGBTQ+ activists and artists, celebrates the 50th Anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising. This project, generated by partnerships made in the Stonewall 50 Consortium, an organization committed to producing programming, exhibitions, and educational materials related to the Stonewall uprising and/or the history of the LGBTQ civil rights movement, brings together participants of the 1969 Stonewall Uprising with activists who have followed in their footsteps.

As part of the heady New York art world of the late ‘80s and early ‘90s, Collier Schorr’s early work mined the vernacular of postmodernism to create photographs that toe the line between documentary and fiction. Often using her subjects allegorically, Schorr’s work navigates the auspices of identity politics to ask beguiling questions about the nomenclature of selfhood. By introducing autobiographical referents and post-appropriation aesthetics into her practice, Schorr’s ongoing body of work negotiates the fluid nature of authorship and performance in relation to portraiture.

Produced by Paul Moakley and Victoria Munro

Funded by the  Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual ArtsRobert Mapplethorpe FoundationThe Shelley and Donald Rubin FoundationHumanities NYNew York Community TrustNew York City Department of Cultural Affairs and the National Endowment for the Arts


Alice Austen House Museum

2 Hylan Boulevard Staten Island, NY 10305

718.816.4506

Open Tues-Sun 11-5


The Thingness of Things: Portraits of Objects

February 5 - May 26

Oberlin College, 87 N Main St, Oberlin, Ohio +

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The Thingness of Things: Portraits of Objects

February 5 - May 26


Allen Memorial Art Museum

Oberlin College, 87 N Main St, Oberlin, Ohio 44074

440.775.8665

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5


Artists Respond: American Art and the Vietnam War, 1965-1975

March 15 - August 18

Eighth & F St NW Washington, DC +

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Artists Respond: American Art and the Vietnam War, 1965-1975

March 15 - August 18

How the Vietnam War changed American art.

By the late 1960s, the United States was in pitched conflict both in Vietnam, against a foreign power, and at home—between Americans for and against the war, for and against the status quo. Artists Respond: American Art and the Vietnam War, 1965–1975 presents art created amid this turmoil, spanning the period from President Lyndon B. Johnson’s fateful decision to deploy U.S. ground troops to South Vietnam in 1965 to the fall of Sài Gònten years later.

Artists Respond is the most comprehensive exhibition to examine the contemporary impact of the Vietnam War on American art. The exhibition is unprecedented in its historical scale and depth. It brings together nearly 100 works by fifty-eight of the most visionary and provocative artists of the period. Galvanized by the moral urgency of the Vietnam War, these artists reimagined the goals and uses of art, affecting developments in multiple movements and media: photography, painting, sculpture, printmaking, performance, installation, documentary art, and conceptualism. This exhibition presents both well-known and rarely discussed works, and offers an expanded view of American art during the war, introducing a diversity of previously marginalized artistic voices, including women, African Americans, Latinos, and Asian Americans. The exhibition makes vivid an era in which artists endeavored to respond to the turbulent times and openly questioned issues central to American civic life.

Artists Respond: American Art and the Vietnam War, 1965–1975 is organized by Melissa Ho, curator of twentieth-century art at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

The exhibition is presented in conjunction with an installation by internationally acclaimed artist Tiffany Chung. Tiffany Chung: Vietnam, Past Is Prologue, probes the legacies of the Vietnam War and its aftermath through maps, paintings, and videos that share the stories of former Vietnamese refugees.


Press Release

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Eighth & F St NW Washington, DC 20004

202.633.1000

Open daily 11:30-7