LOCATIONS FILTERS

Judy Dater: Personas: A Survey of Works from 1965-2016

May 10 - June 30

724 Ellis Street, San Francisco, CA, USA +

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Judy Dater: Personas: A Survey of Works from 1965-2016

May 10 - June 30

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Gallery Exhibition Schedule

Judy DATER: Personas
A Survey of Works from 1965-2016

May 10 – June 30, 2018

Modernism is pleased to present an exhibition of photographs by Judy DATER, which will be on view concurrently with her first major retrospective at the De Young Museum in San Francisco.

Judy Dater’s subjects are her cast of characters, she chooses them instinctively for what she perceives to be their ability to express emotions, to be playful, sexy and humorous, and to reveal what she identifies as soul. Her work transcends the personal and creates a universal language of expression that the viewer can identify, connect, and empathize with on an intuitive level. The human face is infinite in its variety. Dater finds her subjects (from Maxine Hong Kingston to Imogen Cunningham to name a couple) anywhere and everywhere, from standing in line to buy bread in Berkeley, California, to meeting someone on the street in Tokyo, or a cafe in Cairo, to stepping out of an elevator in Rome. “The excitement and delight I experience when I see a face that I want to possess allows me to overcome my inhibition and approach them, but not always. There are the ones that “got away.” We live in a time of virtual experience where we can distance ourselves from the uncomfortable realities around us. I crave the authentic and revel in the messiness and complexity of human feelings and emotions.”

The nude body, women, men, and herself, became an important vehicle for her to express ideas about sexuality, gender politics, freedom, vulnerability, strength, and character. Dater thinks of her nude photographs as “naked portraits,” portraits with heat. “Naked portraits take us out of the realm of the “normal” and a highly charged drama develops between the model and myself that requires a balance between control and abandon. Over the course of fifty years, I continue to return to my original love of the black and white image. It possesses the alchemy to transform and dramatize the ordinary while emphasizing surface and texture through the rich tonalities of the grayscale. I wish to conjure a world of poetic imagination that embraces the unabashedly romantic and unvarnished reality.”

Judy Dater has been a major figure contributing to Photography’s breakout moment in the 1960s.

Over the years her intimate and insightful portraits and nudes have influenced and inspired a generation of photographers. Her work has been exhibited world-wide and is held in numerous important collections. She is the author of several books including Women and Other Visions with Jack Welpott, 1975, Imogen Cunningham: A Portrait, 1979, Judy Dater: 20 Years, 1986, and Cycles, 1992. Her newest book of photographs, Only Human, was just published by Marymount Institute Press.

Dater was born in 1941 in Hollywood and grew up in Los Angeles. Her father owned a movie theater, so movies became the prism through which she viewed the world and they had a profound influence on her photography. She studied art at UCLA from 1959 to 1962 before moving to San Francisco and received a bachelor’s degree in 1963 and a master’s degree in 1966, both from San Francisco State University.

Judy Dater uses photography as an instrument for challenging traditional conceptions of the female body. Her early work paralleled the emergence of the feminist movement and her work became strongly associated with it. At a time when female frontal nudity was considered risqué Dater pushed the boundaries by taking pictures of the naked female body. However, she did so in a way which did not objectify her subject which was in many cases, herself.

Dater began taking photographs in the 1960s and she is still taking photographs today. Mark Johnstone, An author and independent arts curator whom Dater photographed in the early 80’s remarked that “During this time, she never got swayed by or indulged in trends, but moved with her own vision. She’s one of the few successful women in the art world, especially photography, who never depended on ongoing
academic support to fuel and expand her artistic exploration.” She has been the recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship, a Rockefeller Foundation grant for a residency at Bellagio, a Djerassi Artist in Residence grant and two National Endowment for the Arts Grants.

 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL: 415/541-0461 / FAX: 415/541-0425,
OR EMAIL: INFO@MODERNISMINC.COM.

HI-RES IMAGES AVAILABLE ON REQUEST.


Press Release

Modernism

724 Ellis Street, San Francisco, CA, USA

415.541.0461

info@modernisminc.com

Open Tues-Sat 10-5:30



Doug Aitken: New Era

April 13 - May 25

555 West 21st Street, New York, NY, +

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Doug Aitken: New Era

April 13 - May 25

“Hello, My Name is Martin Cooper. In 1973 I invented the very first cellular telephone. Standing on 6th Avenue, New York City, near the Hilton Hotel, I made a phone call. This was the very first public cellphone call.”

303 Gallery presents a new installation by Doug Aitken, titled New Era. On view from April 13 through May 25, 2018, New Era is centered around 89-year-old protagonist Martin Cooper’s seemingly straightforward statements about his invention of the mobile phone and his thoughts on the future. Aitken’s film was inspired by his research into and conversations with the inventor of this ubiquitous device, and weaves the story of Cooper’s life into a poetic narrative about humanity’s history and future. Beginning with this simple introduction, Cooper’s words become the leitmotif of a gradual deconstruction of images and sounds into a dystopian landscape where nature and technology coexist.

New Era functions like a Greek mythology for the 21st century, positing what an age of absolute connectivity might look like. Will it lead to a possibility of a post-human future, where technology could reach the capacity to gradually alter the very essence of our existence?

New Era explores the technological ambivalence of contemporary culture, raising philosophical questions about the challenges of immediate access to communication and network while we distance ourselves from our metaphysical being.

This immersive installation of moving images, expanding architecture and surrounding sound creates a “liquid environment”. The exhibition is set within a hexagonal pavilion built into the gallery space, featuring three projectors set opposite to three mirrored walls. Together, the walls become a 3-dimensional screen—a structure that at once holds and reflects images in a continuous loop, creating a vast and dynamic visual tapestry. The viewer “entering” the screen is no longer a spectator but an interlocutor. The screen dissolves the viewer into a hallucinatory world, distorting their sense of time and self. The work reflects how technology allows for connection, knowledge and communication to take place at light speed.

The exhibition continues in a second room connected to the main installation through a narrow corridor animated by an inexplicable flickering light. Titled Jungle, the single work hanging on a sidewall in an otherwise minimal, empty space is a neon object that glows in space while perpetually changing patterns and rehashing its title in seemingly endless variations. The neon’s pulsating beams of light form distinct iterations of the word “jungle” in a manner that is utterly hypnotic, addictive and unsettling.

New Era questions how technology and ideas of interconnectivity in the virtual reality age can impact our basic humanity.


Press Release

303 Gallery

555 West 21st Street, New York, NY, United States

212.255.1121

Open Tues-Sat 10-6


Elizabeth Conn-Hollyn: Borders/Boundaries: Kashmir

May 19 - June 9

321 Washington Ave, Brooklyn, NY, +

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Elizabeth Conn-Hollyn: Borders/Boundaries: Kashmir

May 19 - June 9

321 Gallery presents a dual-projection of Borders/Boundaries: Kashmir, the second iteration of Elizabeth Conn-Hollyn’s ongoing “Borders/Boundaries” project. This is Conn-Hollyn’s first solo show in New York City.

Over the past decade, Conn-Hollyn’s work has focused on both the literal and abstract concept of borders. Among her various projects, she has photographed “Welcome To…” signs between state lines; attempted to take studio portraits of everyone she knows in order to analyze her social network; operated a drone to create introspective videos of its own flight paths; and used Google Earth to create fly-over investigations of the border between the US and Mexico. Making work that is objective in appearance, Conn-Hollyn uses a variety of media to create typologies addressing the powers that control the shifting landscape we inhabit, and the issues arising from the bureaucratic representations of borders. Her focus lies with what is misrepresented and who is not pictured. In Borders/Boundaries: Kashmir (2018), Conn-Hollyn presents two video projections, Zoom Toggle Don’t Blink and Line of Control Border Tour, two works that explore the Kashmir region through publicly available satellite maps and imagery of the contested military control line between the Indian and Pakistani controlled zones of the territory. She has created soundtracks to accompany the videos.

Elizabeth Conn-Hollyn (b. 1987, Santa Monica, CA) is an interdisciplinary artist based in Los Angeles. She uses video, photography, cartography and drawing to examine the hegemonic depictions of geopolitical border regions and networks. Recent projects directly related to her practice include “Research Reventón” (Tijuana, MX & Los Angeles, CA) and “Everybody I Know” at The Hammer Museum (Los Angeles, CA). Recent exhibitions include Border/Boundaries: US at the New Wight Gallery (UCLA, Los Angeles, CA) and Hello Earth at Loom Gallery (Brooklyn, NY). She is a recipient of the University of California Institute for Research in the Arts Grant, multiple travel and research grants from UCLA, and was a fellow at The Artist Project of Los Angeles. Conn-Hollyn graduated with a BA in photography from Bard College and received an MFA from the University of California, Los Angeles.


321 Gallery

321 Washington Ave, Brooklyn, NY, 11205, USA

321@321GALLERY.ORG

Open Sat 12–5


Ben Depp: Bayou’s End

April 5 - September 30

241 Chartres St New Orleans, LA +

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Ben Depp: Bayou’s End

April 5 - September 30

Bayou’s End, A Gallery for Fine Photography’s exhibition of photographs by Ben Depp, captures the rapidly changing landscape of Southern Louisiana from the birds-eye perspective of a motor-powered paraglider piloted by the artist himself. The incredible risk required to make these photographs is not always apparent in the images themselves; Depp must navigate changing wind conditions and avoid obstacles while not dropping his camera or being dropped himself, often while flying mere feet above the water’s surface. Depp’s photographs function as both documentary and fine art, contributing meaningfully to the ongoing dialogue on Louisiana’s wetland loss while simultaneously transcending this context.


A Gallery for Fine Photography

241 Chartres St New Orleans, LA 70130

504.568.1313

joshuamann@att.net

Open Thur-Mon 10:30-5


Gun Country

March 10 - July 31

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA +

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Gun Country

March 10 - July 31

Issues of gun ownership, culture, and violence continue to divide the United States. Gun Country​ explores representations of firearms in the Addison’s collection in order to examine the historical underpinnings of the country’s gun fascination. On view in the Museum Learning Center, these objects are shown together for the first time and serve as an invitation to a community discussion of the pervasive cultural iconography of the gun in America.


Press Release

Addison Gallery of American Art

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA 01810

978.749.4015

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5



Photographers Among Us

April 7 - July 31

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA +

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Photographers Among Us

April 7 - July 31

​​Drawn from the museum’s collection, Photographers Among Us​ presents a selection of 20th-century documentary works. From Lewis Hine’s photographs of child laborers in 1910 to Danny Lyon’s images of Texas prison inmates in the late 1960s, many of the pictures included exhibit a civic consciousness. Mirrors of their times, produced for newspapers, magazines, photobooks, government-sponsored projects, or the United States Army, photographs in this exhibition have become historical agents, shaping our understanding of the past.​


Addison Gallery of American Art

Phillips Academy, 180 Main St Andover, MA 01810

978.749.4015

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Sun 1-5



Jerry Birchfield: Asleep in the Dust

March 24 - September 23

One South High Akron, OH +

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Jerry Birchfield: Asleep in the Dust

March 24 - September 23

Photography has a weighty history as an art medium and as a tool to record our daily lives. We tend to seek value in what pictures are of rather than in physical photographic objects. The work of Jerry Birchfield examines this tendency to privilege images using photography, sculpture, drawing and text. Jerry Birchfield: Asleep in the Dust highlights the artist’s iterative process through which he creates works of art that blur boundaries between image, object, subject and meaning.

Birchfield applies layers of darkroom processes to achieve untraditional gelatin silver prints. Unlike most printed photographs, Birchfield’s are unique, as each sheet of paper retains traces of physical acts performed in the darkroom. Camera-based film negatives are enlarged onto light-sensitive paper that is partially obstructed by other materials (the technique used to make photograms). Chemicals then develop the latent image and further stretch contrast, tone and texture, sometimes introducing or erasing major compositional elements. In these highly constructed photographs, meaning emerges as much from the process of their production as from the recognizable imagery they contain.

Slivers of visible images reveal dusty, debris-laden surfaces that were in fact created to be photographed. Every aspect of Birchfield’s work emerges from the isolated space of his studio, where scraps, detritus and unfinished works often reappear in new iterations of ideas. In some cases, photographs become sculptures—by encasing prints in plaster, Birchfield masks their images and warps the paper. Viewers are confronted by the space that the photograph and the surrounding plaster occupy, which corresponds to the dimensions of a photograph in a standard frame.

Anchoring the exhibition, a raised platform in the center of the gallery references the importance of the act of framing for Birchfield. Its structure incorporates rectangular horizontal sections that are covered in glass, referencing common picture frames. Like amateur actors, sculptures that appear to mimic everyday objects are assembled on the stage. Some of these sculptures were created for past projects; others were made from fragments of cast-off materials—they have emerged from the dust of Birchfield’s studio.

—Elizabeth M. Carney, Assistant Curator, Akron Art Museum

Jerry Birchfield: Asleep in the Dust is organized by the Akron Art Museum with support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and the Ohio Arts Council.


Akron Art Museum

One South High Akron, OH 44308

330.376.9185

Open Wed-Sun 11-5, Thur 11-9


Diane Arbus: Diane Arbus: A box of ten photographs

April 6, 2018 - January 27, 2019

Eighth & F St NW Washington, DC +

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Diane Arbus: Diane Arbus: A box of ten photographs

April 6, 2018 - January 27, 2019

In late 1969, Diane Arbus began to work on a portfolio. At the time of her death in 1971, she had completed the printing for eight known sets of A box of ten photographs, of a planned edition of fifty, only four of which she sold during her lifetime. Two were purchased by photographer Richard Avedon; another by artist Jasper Johns. A fourth was purchased by Bea Feitler, art director at Harper’s Bazaar, for whom Arbus added an eleventh photograph.

This exhibition traces the history of A box of ten photographs between 1969 and 1973, using the set that Arbus assembled for Feitler, which was acquired by the Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) in 1986. The story is a crucial one because it was the portfolio that established the foundation for Arbus’s posthumous career, ushering in photography’s acceptance to the realm of “serious” art. After his encounter with Arbus and the portfolio, Philip Leider, then editor in chief of Artforum and a photography skeptic, admitted, “With Diane Arbus, one could find oneself interested in photography or not, but one could no longer. . . deny its status as art. . . . What changed everything was the portfolio itself.”

In May 1971, Arbus was the first photographer to be featured in Artforum, which also showcased her work on its cover. In June 1972, the portfolio was sent to Venice, where Arbus was the first photographer included in a Biennale, at that time the premiere international showcase for contemporary artists. SAAM organized the American contribution to the Biennale that year, thereby playing an important early role in Arbus’s legacy.


Smithsonian American Art Museum

Eighth & F St NW Washington, DC 20004

202.633.1000

Open daily 11:30-7



The Metropolis in Latin America, 1830–1930

March 22 - June 30

680 Park Ave New York, NY +

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The Metropolis in Latin America, 1830–1930

March 22 - June 30


Americas Society

680 Park Ave New York, NY 10021

212.249.8950

Open Wed-Sat 12-6


Rania Matar: In Her Image: Photographs by Rania Matar

December 23, 2017 - June 17, 2018

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX +

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Rania Matar: In Her Image: Photographs by Rania Matar

December 23, 2017 - June 17, 2018

This exhibition brings together four bodies of work by the Lebanese-American photographer Rania Matar that trace the development of female identity through portraiture. Depicting transitional moments of life, from young girlhood to middle age, Matar’s works address personal and collective identity through photographs mining female adolescence and womanhood. Photographing girls and women in both the United States and the Middle East, the artist shows how the forces that shape female identity transcend cultural and geographic boundaries.


Amon Carter Museum of American Art

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX 76107

817.738.1933

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Thur 10-8, Sun 12-5



Ellen Carey: Ellen Carey: Dings, Pulls, and Shadows

January 20 - July 22

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX +

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Ellen Carey: Ellen Carey: Dings, Pulls, and Shadows

January 20 - July 22

Since the 1990s, experimental photographer Ellen Carey has been making photographs that defy photographic conventions of depicting identifiable subjects. Instead, her works depict vibrant fields of color that are meditations on the very nature of photography as an image created by the action of light on a light-sensitive surface. The exhibition Ellen Carey: Dings, Pulls, and Shadows features seven key works that explore the artist’s interest in color, light, and the photographic process as the subject of her practice.


Amon Carter Museum of American Art

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX 76107

817.738.1933

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Thur 10-8, Sun 12-5



Jan Staller: CYCLE and SAVED

February 24 - August 19

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX +

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Jan Staller: CYCLE and SAVED

February 24 - August 19

These two short videos by New York photographer-videographer Jan Staller reflect on a potent contradiction of contemporary material life. Where CYCLE revels in the powerful abstracting of paper traveling at high speed down a conveyer belt on its first step to being recycled, SAVED is a playful celebration of hundreds of small tools and toys accumulated over the years by the artist. Together these videos ask us to reflect on what we choose to keep and what we throw away.


Amon Carter Museum of American Art

3501 Camp Bowie Blvd Ft Worth, TX 76107

817.738.1933

Open Tues-Sat 10-5, Thur 10-8, Sun 12-5